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Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 6
P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of troops and recruited an army, sought permission to take them to the field; but was ordered by General Holmes with his whole command to Jacksonport, Arkansas, "and," says Mr. T., "he might as well for the time be stationed in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw the practicability of cutting off supplies and reinforcements from the west bank of the river.--He made an earnest application to Holmes to be allowed to take a few heavy guns, and station them at a point where the enemy's transport fleet could be destroyed, offering to work as a private and a gunner. Holmes's army was doing nothing — never was doing anything, but dying, running, and b
Jacksonport (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 6
sue the enemy when and where he could strike him to best advantage. Mr. T. learned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General Smith's presence would be required in Louisiana. Gen. P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of troops and recruited an army, sought permission to take them to the field; but was ordered by General Holmes with his whole command to Jacksonport, Arkansas, "and," says Mr. T., "he might as well for the time be stationed in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw the practicability of cutting off supplies and reinforcements from the west bank of the river.--
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
the Trans-Mississippi Department, and when he was preceded a few days by Gen. Price, that Gen. Smith was to have supreme command and that Gen Price was to be assigned to active command in the field, untrammeled, to pursue the enemy when and where he could strike him to best advantage. Mr. T. learned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General Smith's presence would be required in Louisiana. Gen. P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of troops and recruited an army, sought permission to take them to the field; but was ordered by General Holmes with his whole command to Jacksonport, Arkansas, "and," says Mr. T., "he might as well for the time be stationed in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed t
Australia (Australia) (search for this): article 6
that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General Smith's presence would be required in Louisiana. Gen. P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of troops and recruited an army, sought permission to take them to the field; but was ordered by General Holmes with his whole command to Jacksonport, Arkansas, "and," says Mr. T., "he might as well for the time be stationed in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw the practicability of cutting off supplies and reinforcements from the west bank of the river.--He made an earnest application to Holmes to be allowed to take a few heavy guns, and
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 6
ed, to pursue the enemy when and where he could strike him to best advantage. Mr. T. learned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General S by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw the practicability of cutting oand a gunner. Holmes's army was doing nothing — never was doing anything, but dying, running, and being captured, as at Arkansas Post. But Col Taylor's application was refused on the ground that the enemy would land and burn the country. (They did and promptness. When he was sent to the trans Mississippi the army here was certainly not at all grieved. But if he has been the mar-plot in Arkansas that Mr. Tucker alleges, it were better that he had staid here The facts deserve investigation.
Clay Taylor (search for this): article 6
ned in Australia." We extract the following paragraph from his letter: At the time Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemy to reinforce and feed. Grant's army, and saw thwork as a private and a gunner. Holmes's army was doing nothing — never was doing anything, but dying, running, and being captured, as at Arkansas Post. But Col Taylor's application was refused on the ground that the enemy would land and burn the country. (They did not burn Mississippi homes and plantations!) Gen. Price then went in person to second Col. Taylor's application. "I will go," said he, "and take my division with me; and let the enemy land if he dare; I'll whip him back into the river." But Holmes would not allow any thing of the kind to be attempted. The writer further states that Gen. Holmes had at one time 40,000 men, who were demoral
arned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under himsought permission to take them to the field; but was ordered by General Holmes with his whole command to Jacksonport, Arkansas, "and," says Mrfrom the west bank of the river.--He made an earnest application to Holmes to be allowed to take a few heavy guns, and station them at a pointet could be destroyed, offering to work as a private and a gunner. Holmes's army was doing nothing — never was doing anything, but dying, run the enemy land if he dare; I'll whip him back into the river." But Holmes would not allow any thing of the kind to be attempted. The writer further states that Gen. Holmes had at one time 40,000 men, who were demoralized and diminished to 12,000 without striking one blow. "No and may well arouse an indignant feeling through the country. General Holmes is by many considered an effete commander, belonging to the cla
Kirby Smith (search for this): article 6
luding to the reports put forth at the time Kirby Smith was ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and when he was preceded a few days by Gen. Price, that Gen. Smith was to have supreme command and that Gen Price was to be assigned to active command in the field, untrammeled, to pursue the enemy when and where he could strik. T. learned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General Smith's presence would be required in Louisiana. Gen. P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of troops and recruited an army, sought permission tominished to 12,000 without striking one blow. "Now," he says, "when our fate trembles in the balance, 15,000 to 20,000 men are held in a vice; they neither help Kirby Smith opposite Vicksburg, nor capture Helena, nor destroy the enemy's means of subsistence, nor threaten St. Louis, nor anything else in God's world to aid our cause"
J. W. Tucker (search for this): article 6
The Trans-Mississippi Department A letter appears in the Mississippian from Mr. J. W. Tucker, and editor of talents and said to be a gentleman of respectable standing making some statements that, if true, merit the immediate attention of the War Department. He commences by alluding to the reports put forth at the time Kirby Smith was ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and when he was preceded a few days by Gen. Price, that Gen. Smith was to have supreme command and that Gen Pricnant feeling through the country. General Holmes is by many considered an effete commander, belonging to the class of officers who did mischief around this city during the terrible battles which were to decide its fate through their want of activity and promptness. When he was sent to the trans Mississippi the army here was certainly not at all grieved. But if he has been the mar-plot in Arkansas that Mr. Tucker alleges, it were better that he had staid here The facts deserve investigation.
Gen Price (search for this): article 6
Smith was ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and when he was preceded a few days by Gen. Price, that Gen. Smith was to have supreme command and that Gen Price was to be assigned to active cGen Price was to be assigned to active command in the field, untrammeled, to pursue the enemy when and where he could strike him to best advantage. Mr. T. learned that upon their arrival in Arkansas it was certained that General Holmes was in command there, and that General Price would be under him; and that General Smith's presence would be required in Louisiana. Gen. P., he continues, who had restored confidence to a number of trootime Jackson was being burnt by Grant, and Vicksburg was being invested, Col Clay Taylor, of General Price's staff, crossed the Mississippi river to Arkansas, witnessed the efforts making by the enemenemy would land and burn the country. (They did not burn Mississippi homes and plantations!) Gen. Price then went in person to second Col. Taylor's application. "I will go," said he, "and take my di
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