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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 9
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not b
United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
tion." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apConfederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not beinConfederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not being established in a way" to justify England's interference, no application could be made to them on the subject. He hoped the Confederate States, "if they should succeed in establishing their independConfederate States, "if they should succeed in establishing their independence," would enter into the same arrangements relative to the slave trade that the United States had adopted. The London Army and Navy Gazette, of the 13th, foretells and recommends Lee's invasioUnited States had adopted. The London Army and Navy Gazette, of the 13th, foretells and recommends Lee's invasion of the North, and says that "such a proof of strength would be appreciated by Europe." The English Government is preparing for war with Japan.
France (France) (search for this): article 9
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not b
Japan (Japan) (search for this): article 9
r. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not being established in a way" to justify England's interference, no application could be made to them on the subject. He hoped the Confederate States, "if they should succeed in establishing their independence," would enter into the same arrangements relative to the slave trade that the United States had adopted. The London Army and Navy Gazette, of the 13th, foretells and recommends Lee's invasion of the North, and says that "such a proof of strength would be appreciated by Europe." The English Government is preparing for war with Japan.
r. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not being established in a way" to justify England's interference, no application could be made to them on the subject. He hoped the Confederate States, "if they should succeed in establishing their independence," would enter into the same arrangements relative to the slave trade that the United States had adopted. The London Army and Navy Gazette, of the 13th, foretells and recommends Lee's invasion of the North, and says that "such a proof of strength would be appreciated by Europe." The English Government is preparing for war with Japan.
have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward mMr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not being established in a way" to justify England's interference, no a
Petersburg.Journal De St. Petersburg (search for this): article 9
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not b
April, 6 AD (search for this): article 9
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not
Later European news. Dates from Liverpool to the 14th inst. have been received. A dispatch Petersburg, dated the day the Canada sailed, says that the Journal de St. Petersburg, of that date, published a dispatch, dated June 4, addressed by Gortchakoff to Mr. the Emperor's satisfaction at the reply or Mr. Seward to the proposal of France to mediate in the case of Poland, which dispatch concludes as follows: "Such facts draw closer the bonds of sympathy between Russia and America. The Emperor knows how to appreciate the firmness with which Mr. Seward maintains the principle of non intervention." In the British House of Commons, on 11th inst., Lord Palmerston said that as the United States have no relations except those of war with the Confederate States, it would be useless to apply to that Government concerning the suppression of the slave trade. The Confederate States had made that trade a penal offence, but their independence not being recognized by England, "and not b
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