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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
ons, so far I have seen none of the substantial citizens present. An apathy that is fearful, as unparalleled, everywhere prevails. Even among those whom I have looked upon as true Union men — men whom I expected would rush to place themselves under the flag — men who have, through the rebellion, lived in New Orleans and maintained the reparation of being opposed to the rebellion,--men who have even been daring enough to condemn the Confederate leaders, and publicly decry the secession of Louisiana as a National calamity — even such men are holding off, are practically, indeed, by their example, worse enemies to our cause than the open and defiant Secessionist. Now, as the "order" I quote above really effects almost every prominent citizen, certainly all who are in the professions, and, comparatively speaking, none of these persons have as yet "made a sign," and as they have so far pursued their various callings under the "powers that be" unmolested, what is to be the consequenc<
wyer. &c. A correspondent of the New York Times, writing from New Orleans, on the 21st ult., says: This is an important day in the history of New Orleans, for the different "orders." which have been published by Gen. Butler and Gen. Shepley, demanding the oath of allegiance and other loyal demonstrations, whereby the Government can decide between loyal and disloyal men, culminate on Wednesday next, as the acts alluded to are to be performed on or before that mentioned date. To-df the Charter or City Laws and Ordinances of New Orleans, will, without delay, report in writing whether he has complied with General Order No. 41, issued by the Commanding General of this Department, and taken the oath therein prescribed. G. F. Shepley, Military Commandant. Jas. E. Dunham, Secretary. It will be perceived that the time has come for the "showing of hands," and for the result I look forward with painful solicitude. I must confess I have been sadly disappointed in th
From New Orleans. the Union feeling yet — the oath to be administered — Butler and the lawyer. &c. A correspondent of the New York Times, writing from New Orleans, on the 21st ult., says: This is an important day in the history of New Orleans, for the different "orders." which have been published by Gen. Butler and Gen. Shepley, demanding the oath of allegiance and other loyal demonstrations, whereby the Government can decide between loyal and disloyal men, culminate onGen. Butler and Gen. Shepley, demanding the oath of allegiance and other loyal demonstrations, whereby the Government can decide between loyal and disloyal men, culminate on Wednesday next, as the acts alluded to are to be performed on or before that mentioned date. To-day, all grace that preceded the order demanding the oath of allegiance from officials ends, as will be seen by the following notice: Hdq'rs Military Commandant, New Orleans, City Hall. June 20, 1862. Every person who "exercises any office or hold any place of trust or calling which calls for the doing of any act judicial or administrative, which shall or may affect any other person than
C. C. Morgan (search for this): article 6
self along with the loyal cities of the Union. Gen. Butler Stands by the profession. C. C. Morgan, who is an attorney-at-law, was brought before the Commanding General, charged by Mrs. Monroeving attempted to extort money from her. It was shown that Mrs. Monroe called at the office of Mr. Morgan to secure his services in getting the Mayor released from Fort Jackson. Mr. Morgan agreed to uMr. Morgan agreed to undertake the case for $2,000, of which $1,000 was to be paid as a retainer. It is alleged that Mrs. Monroe, being instigated by outside parties, made the charge against Morgan of attempting to extortMorgan of attempting to extort money.--The General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. Morgan had a right to demand what fee he pleased, and that, as an honest man and a loyal citizen, he should be protected. The charge was dishe General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. Morgan had a right to demand what fee he pleased, and that, as an honest man and a loyal citizen, he should be protected. The charge was dismissed.
James E. Dunham (search for this): article 6
e of trust or calling which calls for the doing of any act judicial or administrative, which shall or may affect any other person than the actor," if such office or place is held by him under the authority of the Charter or City Laws and Ordinances of New Orleans, will, without delay, report in writing whether he has complied with General Order No. 41, issued by the Commanding General of this Department, and taken the oath therein prescribed. G. F. Shepley, Military Commandant. Jas. E. Dunham, Secretary. It will be perceived that the time has come for the "showing of hands," and for the result I look forward with painful solicitude. I must confess I have been sadly disappointed in the evidence of loyalty that I expected to discover in this city. I have watched with care the different places provided by the Government where the oath of allegiance could be taken, and, with a very few honorable exceptions, so far I have seen none of the substantial citizens present. An apa
ties of the Union. Gen. Butler Stands by the profession. C. C. Morgan, who is an attorney-at-law, was brought before the Commanding General, charged by Mrs. Monroe, wife of the ex-Mayor, with having attempted to extort money from her. It was shown that Mrs. Monroe called at the office of Mr. Morgan to secure his services iMrs. Monroe called at the office of Mr. Morgan to secure his services in getting the Mayor released from Fort Jackson. Mr. Morgan agreed to undertake the case for $2,000, of which $1,000 was to be paid as a retainer. It is alleged that Mrs. Monroe, being instigated by outside parties, made the charge against Morgan of attempting to extort money.--The General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. MorgIt is alleged that Mrs. Monroe, being instigated by outside parties, made the charge against Morgan of attempting to extort money.--The General held that, as an attorney-at-law, Mr. Morgan had a right to demand what fee he pleased, and that, as an honest man and a loyal citizen, he should be protected. The charge was dismissed.
Butler Stands (search for this): article 6
moral waste of this city. Again I ask, what is to be the consequence if the people named in the order above pay no respect to it? Suppose it falls a dead letter — then our cause, in my opinion, is almost lost; suppose it is enforced — then must commence rigorous measures. It was usurped power that brought the people to the present condition; a constitutional, a superior power must be exerted and be felt ere New Orleans will range itself along with the loyal cities of the Union. Gen. Butler Stands by the profession. C. C. Morgan, who is an attorney-at-law, was brought before the Commanding General, charged by Mrs. Monroe, wife of the ex-Mayor, with having attempted to extort money from her. It was shown that Mrs. Monroe called at the office of Mr. Morgan to secure his services in getting the Mayor released from Fort Jackson. Mr. Morgan agreed to undertake the case for $2,000, of which $1,000 was to be paid as a retainer. It is alleged that Mrs. Monroe, being instigated by o
From New Orleans. the Union feeling yet — the oath to be administered — Butler and the lawyer. &c. A correspondent of the New York Times, writing from New Orleans, on the 21st ult., says: This is an important day in the history of New Orleans, for the different "orders." which have been published by Gen. Butler and Gen. Shepley, demanding the oath of allegiance and other loyal demonstrations, whereby the Government can decide between loyal and disloyal men, culminate on Wednesday next, as the acts alluded to are to be performed on or before that mentioned date. To-day, all grace that preceded the order demanding the oath of allegiance from officials ends, as will be seen by the following notice: Hdq'rs Military Commandant, New Orleans, City Hall. June 20, 1862. Every person who "exercises any office or hold any place of trust or calling which calls for the doing of any act judicial or administrative, which shall or may affect any other person than
June 20th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 6
which have been published by Gen. Butler and Gen. Shepley, demanding the oath of allegiance and other loyal demonstrations, whereby the Government can decide between loyal and disloyal men, culminate on Wednesday next, as the acts alluded to are to be performed on or before that mentioned date. To-day, all grace that preceded the order demanding the oath of allegiance from officials ends, as will be seen by the following notice: Hdq'rs Military Commandant, New Orleans, City Hall. June 20, 1862. Every person who "exercises any office or hold any place of trust or calling which calls for the doing of any act judicial or administrative, which shall or may affect any other person than the actor," if such office or place is held by him under the authority of the Charter or City Laws and Ordinances of New Orleans, will, without delay, report in writing whether he has complied with General Order No. 41, issued by the Commanding General of this Department, and taken the oath there