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Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
aylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousand of the enemy, and they "refuse to be paroled! " The number of prisoners are finally reduced to four thousand, and some have been charitable enough to imagine that there was a mistake in transcribing the sum, by which four was magnified into forty. But the signs of the telegraph do not admit of such a mistake. Yet again, if this were not so, the particularity with which the message described the movement of the falling back of
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
ick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousan
Dick Taylor (search for this): article 3
he Southwest we have had message after message that was, if not incredible upon its face, contradicted by subsequent information. Milliken's Bead has been taken several times, yet we have never had possession of it. Kirby Smith, Magruder, and Dick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the te
by them. From the Southwest we have had message after message that was, if not incredible upon its face, contradicted by subsequent information. Milliken's Bead has been taken several times, yet we have never had possession of it. Kirby Smith, Magruder, and Dick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one dMagruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all
ss over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousand of the enemy, and they "refuse
Telegraphic lies. The unfounded and extravagant stories that have been transmitted recently by the telegraph, occasion wide spread complaint. The press and the public have been annoyed past endurance by them. From the Southwest we have had message after message that was, if not incredible upon its face, contradicted by subsequent information. Milliken's Bead has been taken several times, yet we have never had possession of it. Kirby Smith, Magruder, and Dick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Ban
Kirby Smith (search for this): article 3
Telegraphic lies. The unfounded and extravagant stories that have been transmitted recently by the telegraph, occasion wide spread complaint. The press and the public have been annoyed past endurance by them. From the Southwest we have had message after message that was, if not incredible upon its face, contradicted by subsequent information. Milliken's Bead has been taken several times, yet we have never had possession of it. Kirby Smith, Magruder, and Dick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Ba
at many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousand of the enemy, and they "refuse to be paroled! " The number of priso
gruder, and Dick Taylor have been made to cross over the Mississippi and do a great many things which they never have done — and have been rapidly moved from one point to another at a great distance in an incredibly short space of time. Magruder one day is marching upon New Orleans, when it is not probable he is outside of the boundaries of Texas. Everything is received with doubt that comes from that direction. The last report that Dick Taylor had crossed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured
ed the Mississippi and was joining Gardner at Port Hudson, had completely routed Banks, and marched on to reinforce Johnston of course must be received with the incredulity that the questionable ter of everything by telegraph from that quarter is so well calculated to inspire. But all at once the telegraphers from the North appear to be ambitions of outstripping their contemporaries of the far South, and with one bound go a long way ahead of them. We are informed from Martinsburg that Gen. Lee, by an adroit move, has captured forty thousand of the enemy, and they "refuse to be paroled! " The number of prisoners are finally reduced to four thousand, and some have been charitable enough to imagine that there was a mistake in transcribing the sum, by which four was magnified into forty. But the signs of the telegraph do not admit of such a mistake. Yet again, if this were not so, the particularity with which the message described the movement of the falling back of the centre, and