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gment of their public servants. A change in the Cabinet would promote enlistments; but if it is not evident by the middle of the month that men volunteer with the requisite alacrity, the Government must adopt vigorous measures and promptly resort to a draft. An additional hundred thousand men in twenty days will throttle the rebellion. If they cannot be had in one way they must in another. Gen. McClellan must immediately be furnished with men enough to co-operate effectively with Captain Wilkes and take Fort Darling, which is the key to Richmond. Fifty thousand men for garrison duty, to relieve trained soldiers, and another fifty thousand to fill up the decimated regiments, would enable our army to take Richmond within five days after the arrival of reinforcements at Harrison's Landing. Reinforce McClellan promptly and adequately, an no subsequent blundering in the War Department can defer the fall of the Confederate Capital, whatever else it may defer or prevent. The ca
Lewis Wallace (search for this): article 8
. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand
Decatur (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 8
not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayon
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
ot at all commensurate with their cost. Had it never been conceived, we should have failed to take New Orleans and some other ports quite so soon, white we should have ere this utterly extinguished the rebellion in Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. The "Anaconda" makes a present to the Confederates of the all but exclusive use of railroads and telegraphs. It enables him to choose among our several army corps that one on which he shall precipitate his entire moveable force. It enablds a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 8
le troops into one grand army, and hurling it swiftly and strongly upon the chief strongholds of the rebellion successively, will be adhered to. The Anaconda has cost us a year's time, one hundred thousand men, and five hundred millions of money, and its fruits are not at all commensurate with their cost. Had it never been conceived, we should have failed to take New Orleans and some other ports quite so soon, white we should have ere this utterly extinguished the rebellion in Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. The "Anaconda" makes a present to the Confederates of the all but exclusive use of railroads and telegraphs. It enables him to choose among our several army corps that one on which he shall precipitate his entire moveable force. It enables him to be uniformly superior at the point of collision though we have more and better troops in the field than he has. It enables him to know the result of any conflict within a few hours after its occurrence. while we must wait a
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 8
and is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suffer such a tyranny. If such is the belief of Mr. Bradford, this does not seem to be the general opinion. Many papers indicate conscription as the only means of procuring sufficient soldiers. The need is in fact so pressing, and the eagerness to enlist so little marked, that many towns have voted a county in addition to tha
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 8
nks of the Potomac. It is know too, that Pope is powerless, for the moment to make any stand against a serious attack. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South f
Warren (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 8
l for troops; shall continue to receive half-pay during their term of service in the war, and have their situations restored to them on their return. Two thousand men are in the regular employ of the company, at an average salary of over $690 per annum. How to promote enlistments.[from the New York World.] Why do not our enterprising recruiting officers call into play some of the agencies employed in other countries to stimulate enlistments! Let the eye and the ear be appealed to. The air should be resonant with trumpets, and drums and martial music, and every day or two our streets should be gay with processions and small armies with banners. The pomp and circumstance of glorious war, if properly presented to the imagination of our young men, will be quite as effectual as a large increase of bounty money, though that should not be and is not neglected. At all events, let this plan be tried. The pocket nerve is not the only one that goes to the heart of Young America.
France (France) (search for this): article 8
e poor excuse they had in the light of the results of last week; and that which was before laid to the account of wholesome prudence will now he charged, and we believe with justice, to blundering and obstinate incompetency. It is a significant sign of what is going on abroad, that the French Princes, who have for many months been attached to General McClellan's staff, have left the army, and return to Europe by the next steamer. They would fight for us, but, if we should have war with France, they cannot fight against French soldiers. They see the full significance of the results before Richmond and the effect the news will have in Europe, and they retire in time. Depressing influence of the returned sick and wounded.[from the New York World.] What can the authorities mean by thrusting the sick and wounded of the army before the eyes of the whole community? Instead of providing five or six great hospitals in healthy inland locations for the maimed and enfeebled, it ha
h has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suffer such a tyranny. If such is the belief of Mr. Bradford, this does not seem to be the general opinion. Many papers indicate conscription as the only means of procuring sufficient soldiers. The need is in fact so pressing, and the eagerness to enlist so little marked, that many towns have voted a county in addition to that already allowed by Mr. Stanton. The municipal council of Buffalo has voted $75 per head, payable by the city to every new recruit. European intervention.[from the New York Post.] All the signs show that we stand at the grave and serious crisis of our history. The recent intimations from Europe look to speedy intervention in our affairs; and if the foreign Powers hesitate, it is not improbable that the news which the next steamer will take to England will help them to a conclusion. The long delay and extrao
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