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r the safety of Washington. There are great fears on this account. It is apprehended that Jackson may fling himself again with irresistible impetuosity, upon the valleys of the Shenandoah and Rappahannock, and that he may appear threatening the banks of the Potomac. It is know too, that Pope is powerless, for the moment to make any stand against a serious attack. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson
Lewis Wallace (search for this): article 8
. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand
Ozarilda Beauregard (search for this): article 8
leys of the Shenandoah and Rappahannock, and that he may appear threatening the banks of the Potomac. It is know too, that Pope is powerless, for the moment to make any stand against a serious attack. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldie
McClernand (search for this): article 8
essionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Ma
September, 7 AD (search for this): article 8
From the North.the Northern press on the Critical situation.the Supreme duty of the hour. [From the New York World, July 9] Richmond is in possession of the Confederates because General McClellan has not men enough — The people have decided opi our finest, best equipped, and most vaunted army has thus far failed to do. The Anaconda.[from the New York Tribune, July 9] Advices from various quarters justify the gratifying belief that conception of ineffable stupidity the great Union "d wounded soldier away from the large centres of population. Recruiting — How it goes.[from the Philadelphia press, July 9.] The matter of recruiting for the new army levy is beginning to engross a share of public attention, but not to the e governmental restriction upon the publication of war news. Liberality of the American Express Company. New York, July 9 --The Directors of the American Express Company of this city have unanimously resolved that any of their present em
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