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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 7
ter star, after wandering in darkness, returning to the galaxy in which it belonged. Missouri had been for a while obscured, but it now shines with redoubled brightness. Maryland had wavered; it is now firmly act in the national coronet. Kentucky had been almost torn from the magic circle; but its stead fastness was now assured. It will not be long before Tennessee will be numbered again among the loyal States, nor till Arkansas shall be again represented in the halls of our Congress. Louisiana had already asked for recognition upon the old basis, and the Old North State would soon follow suit. In a little while we shall witness the extraordinary spectacle of Old Virginia asking forgiveness of her sins, and even South Carolina, the source of all this mischief, would be sandwiched between Georgina and North Carolina and purified of her iniquity. We already see a pretended confederation divided into four parts by transverse lines drawn along the Mississippi river and the Souther
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 7
not the courage directly to refuse the prayer of Frederick Kapp and others. Equally untenable is what Lincoln talks about "confusion." It never occurred to Messrs. Kapp and others to ask the appointment of Fremont and Sigel specially in the state of New York. They want that both General should be generally authorized to raise troops, not in the State of New York alone.--Under the banners of Fremont and Sigel at this moment hosts of men, sager and thorough for war, would at once gather; but witState of New York alone.--Under the banners of Fremont and Sigel at this moment hosts of men, sager and thorough for war, would at once gather; but with indignant egotism Lincoln refuses this chance, although, thanks to the cowardice with which he deferred and again defers the conscription, we have much too few troops. The above is a gratifying contribution to what we said yesterday (in the Sunday issue) about Lincoln's behavior towards Sigel He would rather shamefully perish with his Halleck than behave by men who, without blame on their part, have drawn upon themselves the hate of his Halleck Lincoln a conduct recently has been such that n
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): article 7
ferent !" This is almost as cruel blood letting as that in the pamphlet already referred to, which objected to Mr. Seward's informing Minister Adams, last July, that the "last obstacle to the navigation of the Mississippi had been overcome, and that it was open to trade once more from Prince Rupert's Land" (!) (which is a thousand miles north of its sources) "to the head-waters of the Mississippi;" or that which maliciously suggested that Mr. Seward, in stating to Minister Harvey that "Portugal, in the age of Camoens," brought slavery into this continent, had forgotten that Camoens died in Lisbon in 1579, about half a century before the Portuguese traffic in slaves began on this hemisphere. Intercepted Correspondence. The Chattanooga Rebel publishes a letter from the Colonel Gilbert who broke up the Democratic Convention at Frankfort, Ky., a brother of Gen. Gilbert, of the Yankee army, with whom he is often confounded. The letter was part of the mail intercepted by Cap
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 7
ven South Carolina, the source of all this mischief, would be sandwiched between Georgina and North Carolina and purified of her iniquity. We already see a pretended confederation divided into four parts by transverse lines drawn along the Mississippi river and the Southern line of Tennessee. When the war could no longer be put aside he had but one request to make.--He invoked God Almighty to inspire the people with virtue enough to vote for the Union, and our armies with courage enough to fi We never can crush out this rebellion so long as our opponents are tolerated in taking such unfair advantage of us. Sambo is soon to be employed on our side. I see that Gen Thomas has been organizing him into fighting material on the Mississippi river; and we white folks can "rest on our oars, " while nigger freedom and Southern independence fight the battles! Were it not that I want to see the country about Chattanooga, I believe I would leave the service and retire to the shades o
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 7
e on the continent. There is another reason why I stay in the army. I should be afraid to live in Ohio during the coming summer and fall, the Vallandighamers are getting so bloodthirsty that they would massacre me certain for "snuffing" their party out in this State at Frankfort. Germans on the Rampage. The Chicago States Zeitung indulges in the following comments on the refusal of President Lincoln to allow Generals Sigel and Fremont to raise volunteers and march to the aid of Pennsylvania. This is one way of manifesting "unconditional loyalty." What Lincoln says about Governor Seymour is nothing but a miserable excuse--Everybody knows that Seymour, the intimus of McClellan will appoint neither Fremont nor Sigel. But Lincoln crawls behind him, because he has not the courage directly to refuse the prayer of Frederick Kapp and others. Equally untenable is what Lincoln talks about "confusion." It never occurred to Messrs. Kapp and others to ask the appointment of Fremon
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 7
r in the recovery of her ancient and illustrious independence. Still another, the project to guarantee Cuba to Spain, conjointly with France and Great Britain. More recently, the invitation to cooperate with Spain, France, and Great Britain, in Mexico; and later still, the proposition of some of the Spanish-American States to establish an international council for the republican States of this continent. All these suggestions were, in succession, declined by our Government, and this decision s times unilluminated. But it seems there is one dark cranny--one mystery, here obscurely hinted at, that puzzles us — We are quite aware, as he tells us, that in 1861 or 1862 we were invited to cooperate with Spain, France, and Great Britain in Mexico, and declined doing so; but we learn from this dispatch that "later still"--that is, within the last year or eighteen months--there has been made to us a proposition of the Spanish American States to establish an international council for the rep
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
ation to cooperate with Spain, France, and Great Britain, in Mexico; and later still, the proposition of some of the Spanish-American States to establish an international council for the republican States of this continent. All these suggestions were, in succession, declined by our Government, and this decision was each time approved by the judgment of the American people. Which is thus exposed: But this is not the only blunder. Mr. Seward affirms that the invitation to the United States to join the Congress of the Spanish States of America just liberated, was declined by our Government. Now it so happens, and Mr. Seward is old enough to remember it, that just the reverse is the fact, for the invitation, in 1826, was accepted by our Government, and ministers were appointed and actually went on their errand. This the files of his own department would tell him all about. This is blunder number two. The criticism concludes as follows: We have space for but on
Jackson, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 7
ed paroling the citizens they left with their plunder. On Monday evening following five of them went to the residence of A. D. Palmer, about four miles from town, during the night, and inveigled the old man from his house some distance, and then pretending to have an order from Gen. Banks to take him and his papers and box to Gen. B., they forced the old man to give them his money box and papers, robbing him of six thousand dollars. A few days since they robbed Mr. George Keller, near Jackson, Louisiana, of fifteen thousand dollars. They are now engaged in gathering all the cotton they can find and carrying it off. They go with wagons in parties of from two to three hundred, and take what they can find.--The negroes have gone to them by the hundred. Some of the planters have lost every negro, mule, horse and wagon they had, and in some instances they have taken all the provisions. These are the men that fight according to the laws of nations and respect private property. Every
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 7
t had thus dragged its slow length along, with blood and carnage in its track, through two long years; but in this beginning of the third year we had just attained the beginning of the end. We have seen the stars one by one falling away from our national firmament, but now we are to witness the joyful sight of star after star, after wandering in darkness, returning to the galaxy in which it belonged. Missouri had been for a while obscured, but it now shines with redoubled brightness. Maryland had wavered; it is now firmly act in the national coronet. Kentucky had been almost torn from the magic circle; but its stead fastness was now assured. It will not be long before Tennessee will be numbered again among the loyal States, nor till Arkansas shall be again represented in the halls of our Congress. Louisiana had already asked for recognition upon the old basis, and the Old North State would soon follow suit. In a little while we shall witness the extraordinary spectacle of O
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 7
Progress of the War. Sacking a Southern city — Treatment of the women. If there was any motive lacking to induce the people of the South to form associations for home defence, the following account of the sacking of Clinton, La., by Federal troops, should stir them up to the initiation of measures which may prevent their own homes becoming the scenes of similar outrages. The city was entered by Grierson's Federal cavalry about daylight on Sunday morning, and they immediately commenced searching for arms and arresting citizens. A correspondent of the Atlanta Appeal says: They arrested the citizens and took them to the Masonic Hall, leaving none but the women and children at the houses, and when there was no one, the houses and everything in them were broken open and examined, and when anything suited the fancy or taste of the searcher he appropriated it. From some houses they took every suit of gentleman's clothes, not leaving the owner a change; from others they took a
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