hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 47 1 Browse Search
J. C. Pemberton 28 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 24 0 Browse Search
France (France) 18 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Roebuck 13 13 Browse Search
John Morgan 13 1 Browse Search
Johnston 11 1 Browse Search
Indiana (Indiana, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 3 results.

U. S. Grant (search for this): article 5
Johnston's army would, without any doubt, have been out to pieces. Johnston was on the Big Black, and on Saturday night his army bivouacked with orders to move on Grant's entrenchments at two o'clock in the morning. Before the hour arrived, the news of Pemberton's capitulation was received. From what has since been learned of GrGrant's position, it is now known that if Johnston's force had been doubled and troubled it could never have got through the works of Grant. The country for miles was defended by felled timber — every gorge and ravine a fortified work, bristling with cannon, and converted into a slaughter pen. We are credibly informed that it took sGrant. The country for miles was defended by felled timber — every gorge and ravine a fortified work, bristling with cannon, and converted into a slaughter pen. We are credibly informed that it took some of our paroled officers at Vicksburg fifteen hours to ride fifteen miles through the felled timber and around the excavations and embankments made by the enemy. How long would it have taken an army to march through the same works defended by a superior force? We claim that we have been fortunate in saving the gallant little a
The Impossibility of Johnston saving Vicksburg The Mobile Register says: The proposition of the fall of Vicksburg being absolute, it is now plain that it has fallen with the least possible harm to us. If it had held out only twenty-four hours longer, Johnston's army would, without any doubt, have been out to pieces. Johnston was on the Big Black, and on Saturday night his army bivouackeJohnston was on the Big Black, and on Saturday night his army bivouacked with orders to move on Grant's entrenchments at two o'clock in the morning. Before the hour arrived, the news of Pemberton's capitulation was received. From what has since been learned of Grant's position, it is now known that if Johnston's force had been doubled and troubled it could never have got through the works of Grant. The country for miles was defended by felled timber — every gorge by a superior force? We claim that we have been fortunate in saving the gallant little army of Johnston, as well as the Vicksburg garrison, from further loss. The latter will before long be exchange
Gens Pemberton (search for this): article 5
f Johnston saving Vicksburg The Mobile Register says: The proposition of the fall of Vicksburg being absolute, it is now plain that it has fallen with the least possible harm to us. If it had held out only twenty-four hours longer, Johnston's army would, without any doubt, have been out to pieces. Johnston was on the Big Black, and on Saturday night his army bivouacked with orders to move on Grant's entrenchments at two o'clock in the morning. Before the hour arrived, the news of Pemberton's capitulation was received. From what has since been learned of Grant's position, it is now known that if Johnston's force had been doubled and troubled it could never have got through the works of Grant. The country for miles was defended by felled timber — every gorge and ravine a fortified work, bristling with cannon, and converted into a slaughter pen. We are credibly informed that it took some of our paroled officers at Vicksburg fifteen hours to ride fifteen miles through the fell