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New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
ops, which, we learn by a gentleman who saw the Herald of the 18th, came from Harrisburg. He seems to have cut no further figure — in a word, to have been quite chop fallen. He had previously declared that the constitutionality of the Conscription law should be tested by the Courts, and the authority of the Courts, whichever way they decided, maintained. The attempt to maintain this position would have brought him in direct conflict with Lincoln; for, though the Supreme Court of the State of New York has already decided that the law is unconstitutional, Lincoln is still determined to enforce the draft. --Has Seymour, then, backed out, and given up the ground to Lincoln? After using such determined language, when danger was at a distance, has he closed his mouth as soon as placed face to face with it? We will not willingly impute any unworthy act or motive of which he may be innocent to any man; but we hear nothing from Seymour, and now is the time for him to show his mettle. Now
ts, and the authority of the Courts, whichever way they decided, maintained. The attempt to maintain this position would have brought him in direct conflict with Lincoln; for, though the Supreme Court of the State of New York has already decided that the law is unconstitutional, Lincoln is still determined to enforce the draft. --Lincoln is still determined to enforce the draft. --Has Seymour, then, backed out, and given up the ground to Lincoln? After using such determined language, when danger was at a distance, has he closed his mouth as soon as placed face to face with it? We will not willingly impute any unworthy act or motive of which he may be innocent to any man; but we hear nothing from Seymour, aLincoln? After using such determined language, when danger was at a distance, has he closed his mouth as soon as placed face to face with it? We will not willingly impute any unworthy act or motive of which he may be innocent to any man; but we hear nothing from Seymour, and now is the time for him to show his mettle. Now is the time to take the lion by the beard, if he ever means to do it. Now is the time for him to say whether or not there still be a Constitution in Yankeedom, and, if he cannot maintain it in its integrity, to gather up and stick by the fragments. The word will be much disappoin
John Baren (search for this): article 2
act or motive of which he may be innocent to any man; but we hear nothing from Seymour, and now is the time for him to show his mettle. Now is the time to take the lion by the beard, if he ever means to do it. Now is the time for him to say whether or not there still be a Constitution in Yankeedom, and, if he cannot maintain it in its integrity, to gather up and stick by the fragments. The word will be much disappointed if, after all his bold talk, he should follow in the footsteps of John Van Baren and other peace Democrat of that stripe. The duty of Governor Seymour is so plain that he cannot miss it. The draft is plainly unconstitutional, as anybody may see by reference to the Constitution of the United States. It is not only unconstitutional, but it is made, as if by design, most odiously oppressive. It is not wonderful that the Supreme Court of New York should have decided it to be unconstitutional — that is, if the Judges know anything about the law they profess to inte
Governor Seymour. We are at a loss to know what became of this functionary after the advent of the Federal troops, which, we learn by a gentleman who saw the Herald of the 18th, came from Harriscided that the law is unconstitutional, Lincoln is still determined to enforce the draft. --Has Seymour, then, backed out, and given up the ground to Lincoln? After using such determined language, wute any unworthy act or motive of which he may be innocent to any man; but we hear nothing from Seymour, and now is the time for him to show his mettle. Now is the time to take the lion by the beardn the footsteps of John Van Baren and other peace Democrat of that stripe. The duty of Governor Seymour is so plain that he cannot miss it. The draft is plainly unconstitutional, as anybody may sJudges know anything about the law they profess to interpret. But it will be considered especially wonderful if Governor Seymour fail to do what he has been so long and so loudly threatening to do.