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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 30, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 10
le an earthquake under water. It appears that the naval officers were afraid of employing the potent means placed at their disposal for clearing Charleston harbor of obstructions for fear the shells would act back ward on their vessels.--As might be supposed the constructor has guarded against such an occurrence. The Secretary of the Navy, with a view of removing all doubts on that point, ordered a trial to be made last winter with one of the rafts, the very "devil" afterward towed to Port Royal. The trial proved eminently successful for although the shell pushed up a mountain of water fifty feet above the surface of the Hudson near the head of the raft, not the slightest injury was sustained by the latter. The perfect preservation of slender pieces of wood attached under the raft proved beyond a doubt that the effect of the explosion was, as had been designed, in the forward direction. This singular feature of the monitor torpedo we are not at liberty to describe. What we hav
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 10
the character of a Virginia militia man, that he went before the Bavarian Consul and made oath to his claim of citizenship in Bavaria. We understand that Scharer alleges that he came to this country when he was only six years old, resided in Pennsylvania for some years, then came South, and has been residing in the South for more than twenty years. He has made everything he has among Southern people, to whom be owes a debt of gratitude for support and acquired property. Since the recent droops in Kentucky, &2,000,000 To pay troops in Washington and Virginia750,000 To pay troops in South Carolina1,259,000 To pay troops in North Carolina1,000,000 To New York, to pay mustered out two-year men and returned militia1,500,000 To Pennsylvania, to pay mustered out nine monthsmen and militia1,500,000 About to go to New 2,500,000 Total$20,500.000 To pay Rosecrans's army the paymasters have gone to Tullahoma. To pay Grant's army the paymasters are waiting at St. Louis delayed
Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 10
ed with troops. From observations made, it is believed that the enemy landed about two thousand more troops Sunday at Little Folly Inlet. They are also supposed to have landed a number of and horses, as they had their slings employed the greater portion of the day, during the landing of the troops and were evidently engaged at some very heavy work. Three of the vessels added to the Mocking equation have the appearance of prize steamers captured from this port the Memphis, Aries, and Cherokee. They are all painted lead color. The general opinion seems to be that we shall probably have our bar that some time this week. The late cavalry fight near Shepherdstown. A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Harper's Ferry, Saturday morning, gives the following account of the late cavalry fight near Shepherdstown. There was a smart cavalry fight yesterday afternoon at Shepherdstown in which our troops were completely driven back. The loss was most unusuall
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
isloyalty under cover of foreign protection papers-persuading Confederates to desert. Adam Scharer, a resident of Danville, Va., with protection papers in his pocket from the Bavarian Consul, was lodged in Castle Thunder last week upon the chargre going into action at Gettysburg to prevent its getting into the hands of the Yankees, in the event of his death. The Danville Appeal gives the following history of the case, as elicited in an examination before the Mayor of that city. From t appears that sometime since the letter alluded to was written by a certain Adam Scharer, for some time past residing in Danville, and addressed to his brother, formerly a member of the "Grays." The latter advised the brother to desert to the enemy a Yankee troopers came up, and Scharer's brother managed to let them capture him though his comrade escaped and is now in Danville, where he gave the account of Scharer's performances, and declares that he also could have eluded capture if he had trie
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 10
oga and Rome to be entirely unfounded.--The main body of the Army of the Cumberland, inclusive of all the cavalry, is still resting and preparing for another campaign along the northern slope of the Cumberland Mountains. Huntsville has been visited, but not occupied for any length of time by part of the cavalry. The only troops as yet south of the mountains are small bodies of infantry holding points on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, as far as Stevenson and Bridgeport, on the Tennessee river. Trains from Nashville have been running this week beyond Decherd, and are expected to reach Bridgeport by to-morrow. Only one span of the great bridge at that point was destroyed by the rebels. The tunnel near Stevenson was not injured. General Rosecrans's headquarters were removed on the day before yesterday from Tullahoma to Winchester — The General himself is still at Nashville. As soon as the new secondary basis, necessitated by the recent advance, will be fully establishe
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 10
expected to reach Bridgeport by to-morrow. Only one span of the great bridge at that point was destroyed by the rebels. The tunnel near Stevenson was not injured. General Rosecrans's headquarters were removed on the day before yesterday from Tullahoma to Winchester — The General himself is still at Nashville. As soon as the new secondary basis, necessitated by the recent advance, will be fully established, and other preparations, required by the peculiar character of the proposed future ope, to pay mustered out two-year men and returned militia1,500,000 To Pennsylvania, to pay mustered out nine monthsmen and militia1,500,000 About to go to New 2,500,000 Total$20,500.000 To pay Rosecrans's army the paymasters have gone to Tullahoma. To pay Grant's army the paymasters are waiting at St. Louis delayed by Morgan's raid. Paymasters and funds are ready to pay the Army of the Potomac as fast as rolls are received Very few rolls have been sent in as yet, ing to movements of th
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
ortion of the day, during the landing of the troops and were evidently engaged at some very heavy work. Three of the vessels added to the Mocking equation have the appearance of prize steamers captured from this port the Memphis, Aries, and Cherokee. They are all painted lead color. The general opinion seems to be that we shall probably have our bar that some time this week. The late cavalry fight near Shepherdstown. A correspondent of the New York World, writing from Harper's Ferry, Saturday morning, gives the following account of the late cavalry fight near Shepherdstown. There was a smart cavalry fight yesterday afternoon at Shepherdstown in which our troops were completely driven back. The loss was most unusually severe for a cavalry fight. By what the officers said blame has to be upon some one at present unknown. Our total loss was between 300 and 400 killed and wounded, considerably above 100 killed. One squadron went into action 80 strong and came ou
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
"Grays," it appears that sometime since the letter alluded to was written by a certain Adam Scharer, for some time past residing in Danville, and addressed to his brother, formerly a member of the "Grays." The latter advised the brother to desert to the enemy at the first opportunity and promised on the part of Adam Scharer that he (Adam) would shortly meet him in Baltimore, as he intended to go North. Now, the brother of Adam had been rather ahead of him, for when our army fell back from Suffolk he took that occasion to desert, and managed the thing very adroitly. He in company with another member of his company, straggled off and went into a farm-house to get a meal. While there some Yankee troopers came up, and Scharer's brother managed to let them capture him though his comrade escaped and is now in Danville, where he gave the account of Scharer's performances, and declares that he also could have eluded capture if he had tried. We understand that Scharer, the brother of Adam
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 10
with a charge of 700 pounds of powder. By means of a raft — the "devil"--these shells are pushed some fifty feet ahead of the monitor, suspended at any desirable depth. We shall know in good time how the rebels succeed in obstructing the passage of the monitors when armed with these terrible shells, the explosion of which will reassemble an earthquake under water. It appears that the naval officers were afraid of employing the potent means placed at their disposal for clearing Charleston harbor of obstructions for fear the shells would act back ward on their vessels.--As might be supposed the constructor has guarded against such an occurrence. The Secretary of the Navy, with a view of removing all doubts on that point, ordered a trial to be made last winter with one of the rafts, the very "devil" afterward towed to Port Royal. The trial proved eminently successful for although the shell pushed up a mountain of water fifty feet above the surface of the Hudson near the hea
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 10
at place, whither is not exactly known. Bragg himself is reported to have been called to Richmond. It is ascertained, however, that but from two to three thousand partly mounted cavalry are left in East Tennessee and Northern Alabama. owing to Morgan's expedition North. With the great numerical as cendancy thus gained by our cavalry, that remnant will soon be swept away, the rebel lines of communication placed at our mercy, and the road for raiding incursions to the heart of Alabama and Georgia opened. General Stanly will improve the advantage at which he now has the enemy at an early day. The quantity of ammunition in Vicksburg at the time of its Surrounded. "One of the garrison" writes to the Mobile Advertiser an account of the kind and quantity of ammunition in Vicksburg at the time of its surrender. His account is from "official documents." He says: On the morning of the 17th of May there was between 10,600 and 12,000 rounds of fixed ammunition in the ordnanc
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