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Louis Napoleon (search for this): article 1
Government do not see that the opportunity has arisen" "for advising the re-establishment of peace in America !" The discussion of this subject is with the Foreign Powers, the Confederates are not pressing it. It might have died months ago for us. We may look on and or criticise what falls from Ministers of State about us with no small amount of composure, since we ask nothing and expect very little if anything. We know who our fast friend is in the European diplomacy. That man is Louis Napoleon. He is as much the friend of justice, however, as he is of us, in this matter. It is not probable that his inclination or his interests will permit of long delay in recognizing the Southern Confederacy. England we should think would be forced to concur, but this may be a mistaken idea. She may not be satisfied with the amount of blood that has been shed — she may not think the heroism and constancy displayed by our people entitle us to her recognition. But whatever she thinks the co
and the Legislative Department defer more entirely to the Ministry on all questions touching the foreign relations of the Government. It is quite sufficient to a member of Parliament who moves a resolution or submits an inquiry to be informed by a member of the Cabinet that the resolution would embarrass the Government, or the inquiry could not be answered with a due regard to the public interest, to induce the withdrawal of the resolution and abandonment of the inquiry. So we see that Mr. Roebuck--although a somewhat impracticable person, and although he had introduced his resolution very earnestly and ardently — yields as passively as a bee that is sprinkled with water, and is hived along with his resolution by the Ministry According to Lord Palmerston, "Her Majesty's Government do not see that the opportunity has arisen" "for advising the re-establishment of peace in America !" The discussion of this subject is with the Foreign Powers, the Confederates are not pressing it.