hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Gen Lee 30 0 Browse Search
Gen Burnside 13 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 12 0 Browse Search
James Green 10 0 Browse Search
Mosby 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas M. Brown 9 1 Browse Search
Peter H. Whitehurst 9 1 Browse Search
George B. Fitzgerald 7 1 Browse Search
Washington 6 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 6, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 514 total hits in 267 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Poland (Poland) (search for this): article 1
orality has had the smallest possible share, and we have seldom seen her triumphant save when, by rare good luck, she happened to be on the same side with Might. Power is never just where it has a selfish motive opposed to Justice. The English nation can lay as little claim to credit for Morality as any power on earth. The Old World of which it has been a chief Director of affairs has been the scene of successive national outrages — a conspicuous one of modern times being the partisan of Poland, to which England was a party. In all the revolutions and vicissitudes of nations of that world, where Might has prevailed, it was as often against Morality as for it. On the other hand, with regard to the North American States, the charge of the Times only holds good with reference to the besotted and brutalized power which now rules in the Northern States, and which, by its flagrant outrages upon the Federal Constitution and the rights of the Southern States, forced a dissolution of
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
n the New World and Old England, the former was resisting the principle of Might asserted by the latter, against the Moral principle that a man had a right to choose his country and serve under what flag he pleased. The Government of the United States in all its relations with the world up to the time of the dissolution of the Union, presents the fairest record of all nations. Not an act of injustice stained its pages. Those who shaped its policy and controlled its councils were distinguished Southern statesmen, and to them is chiefly attributable the Morality, the Might and Justice which prevailed. But the United States was doomed to repeat history, and to imitate the Old Word in its many examples that Might makes Right, in order to initiate here a struggle that was to teach them the lesson of Morality. It did this not in its foreign relations, but in its domestic. The besotted power of numbers which became, by peculiarity of pursuits and social condition, centered in
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 1
hey been respected they certainly would have been sufficient, and none, however strong, would have prevailed against that unscrupulous and infatuated sectional majority by which they were trodden into the dust. So that in the political institutions of the New World the moral principle was set up over that of Might. In its history down to the present struggle there is certainly nothing to impeach its integrity in all its foreign relations it acquired no territory by might save that from Mexico. In the war with that nation it had right on its side, and the acquisition of territory was an incident justifiable by the highest examples of the Old World. Its other acquisitions were by purchase; including those from the poor North American Indians, in which it deviated from the example of the Times's own nation, whose Morality it holds up to the admiration of the world ! In the second war between the New World and Old England, the former was resisting the principle of Might asserted by
Captain Maffic This gallant and enterprising officer is a son of the celebrated Methodist preacher and orator, Rev. John Newlin. Moffit. He entered the U. S. navy, we think, about the year 1832, and must be now about 45 years old. He was always considered one of the best officers and most high toned gentlemen of the old service. For some years he was connected with the Coast Survey, and Professor Bache the head of that Department, declared that if Maffin was taken from him be could not supply his place in the whole navy. He is not only a thorough seaman and game to the back house, but a gentleman of superior intellect, a humorist of rare excellence, and of one of the most delightful of compacious. There is no position in his profession which Maffic is not capable of filling with house and destination. We rejoice to see the hived that the brilliant Confederate captain is playing with Yankee commerce. He has made them bleed already nearly to the tune of ten millions, whic
Captain Maffic This gallant and enterprising officer is a son of the celebrated Methodist preacher and orator, Rev. John Newlin. Moffit. He entered the U. S. navy, we think, about the year 1832, and must be now about 45 years old. He was always considered one of the best officers and most high toned gentlemen of the old service. For some years he was connected with the Coast Survey, and Professor Bache the head of that Department, declared that if Maffin was taken from him be could not supply his place in the whole navy. He is not only a thorough seaman and game to the back house, but a gentleman of superior intellect, a humorist of rare excellence, and of one of the most delightful of compacious. There is no position in his profession which Maffic is not capable of filling with house and destination. We rejoice to see the hived that the brilliant Confederate captain is playing with Yankee commerce. He has made them bleed already nearly to the tune of ten millions, whi
Captain Maffic This gallant and enterprising officer is a son of the celebrated Methodist preacher and orator, Rev. John Newlin. Moffit. He entered the U. S. navy, we think, about the year 1832, and must be now about 45 years old. He was always considered one of the best officers and most high toned gentlemen of the old service. For some years he was connected with the Coast Survey, and Professor Bache the head of that Department, declared that if Maffin was taken from him be could not supply his place in the whole navy. He is not only a thorough seaman and game to the back house, but a gentleman of superior intellect, a humorist of rare excellence, and of one of the most delightful of compacious. There is no position in his profession which Maffic is not capable of filling with house and destination. We rejoice to see the hived that the brilliant Confederate captain is playing with Yankee commerce. He has made them bleed already nearly to the tune of ten millions, whic
Captain Maffic This gallant and enterprising officer is a son of the celebrated Methodist preacher and orator, Rev. John Newlin. Moffit. He entered the U. S. navy, we think, about the year 1832, and must be now about 45 years old. He was always considered one of the best officers and most high toned gentlemen of the old service. For some years he was connected with the Coast Survey, and Professor Bache the head of that Department, declared that if Maffin was taken from him be could not supply his place in the whole navy. He is not only a thorough seaman and game to the back house, but a gentleman of superior intellect, a humorist of rare excellence, and of one of the most delightful of compacious. There is no position in his profession which Maffic is not capable of filling with house and destination. We rejoice to see the hived that the brilliant Confederate captain is playing with Yankee commerce. He has made them bleed already nearly to the tune of ten millions, whic
John Newlin (search for this): article 2
Captain Maffic This gallant and enterprising officer is a son of the celebrated Methodist preacher and orator, Rev. John Newlin. Moffit. He entered the U. S. navy, we think, about the year 1832, and must be now about 45 years old. He was always considered one of the best officers and most high toned gentlemen of the old service. For some years he was connected with the Coast Survey, and Professor Bache the head of that Department, declared that if Maffin was taken from him be could not supply his place in the whole navy. He is not only a thorough seaman and game to the back house, but a gentleman of superior intellect, a humorist of rare excellence, and of one of the most delightful of compacious. There is no position in his profession which Maffic is not capable of filling with house and destination. We rejoice to see the hived that the brilliant Confederate captain is playing with Yankee commerce. He has made them bleed already nearly to the tune of ten millions, whic
From Gen. Lee's Army. All the information we have from Northern Virginia points to the concentration of the contending forces in the neighborhood of Fredericksburg, the enemy having evidently selected that route for the next "On to Richmond" demonstration. We have a report, which is deemed reliable, that our pickets in the neighborhood of Stafford's Store were driven in by the enemy on Tuesday afternoon. Another report, not well authenticated, however, states that the Yankees, in force, have occupied Stafford Heights, nearly opposite Fredericksburg.--From present indications it is not improbable that the next trial of strength between the two armies will take place on the old battlefield of December last.
From Gen. Lee's Army. All the information we have from Northern Virginia points to the concentration of the contending forces in the neighborhood of Fredericksburg, the enemy having evidently selected that route for the next "On to Richmond" demonstration. We have a report, which is deemed reliable, that our pickets in the neighborhood of Stafford's Store were driven in by the enemy on Tuesday afternoon. Another report, not well authenticated, however, states that the Yankees, in force, have occupied Stafford Heights, nearly opposite Fredericksburg.--From present indications it is not improbable that the next trial of strength between the two armies will take place on the old battlefield of December last.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...