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Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
eadway against the rebellion until that is down The New York Times thinks the "one supreme necessity" of this war is the destruction of Lee's army. Its history has been "mainly cord of success — invariably so when it acted on the defensive." The Times continues: It has stood like a wall of fire between us and the rebel capital; and to day we are just as far from that point as when two years ago last week we fled back from Bull Run. On the Chickahominy, at Fredericksburg, at Chancellorsville, and on scores of minor fields, enough of patriotic blood has been need to make a river, and yet in vain. The same tremendous foe to-day confronts us. The most we have done has been to cheek it — when it, in turn, become the invader. By the most corporate fighting we succeeded in harting it back at and at Gettysburg, but in neither of these did we do anything more than best it back. We did not disable it; we did not even cripple it. We broke down no part of its organization. We d
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
were all the rest. Mr. Green is grandson of Geo. Nathaniel Green, of Revolutionary fame. Dr. Tod is brother of Governor Tod, of Ohio; Dr. Sykee first cousin of General Sykee, of the United States Army; so you see patriotism is well represented in this little group. The meeting adjourned over to Monday next, at 4 P. M., same place, in order to join in the celebration of this glorious day, the Fourth of July. The procession is just passing the Hall, preceded by the splendid band from Fortress Monroe, followed by a large platform on six wheels. beautifully painted red, white and blue, and drawn by six milk-white horses. This vehicle contained thirty-three fair young maidens, members of the Butte Street Virginia Classical Institute, conducted by three accomplished and refined gentlemen, Messrs. Cohen and Tyler, A. M. Each maiden, dressed in a robe of pure white, had a brilliant golden star in the centre of her forehead, and bearing in her right hand the glorious Star Spangled Banne
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
sand men could be spared, and yet leave forces amply large enough to meet all the troops that could be mastered against them by the rebels in that quarter of the country. With the aid of the rapidly multiplying negro regiments, whose fighting qualities are now universally acknowledged, it would seem that there could be no question of this ability. of the Western soldiers — some thirty or forty regiments there made up of Eastern man — thus to be thrown, by the Knoxville road, through Eastern Tennessee and Western Virginia, upon Lee's flank, and were the old Army of the Potomac at an early day to be reinforced up to its proper standard by the new draft, it would be physically impossible for Lee to hold out for any long period. Of course he, too, would be to some extent reinforced, as he has been already since the battle of Gettysburg. But the forces and the resources of the Confederacy are now too much reduced to admit of any such contribution to its favorite army as thus lies in o
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
Bottomore, Rec. Sec'y Lets Army must be caused — no Headway against the rebellion until that is down The New York Times thinks the "one supreme necessity" of this war is the destruction of Lee's army. Its history has been "mainly cord of success — invariably so when it acted on the defensive." The Times continues: It has stood like a wall of fire between us and the rebel capital; and to day we are just as far from that point as when two years ago last week we fled back from Bull Run. On the Chickahominy, at Fredericksburg, at Chancellorsville, and on scores of minor fields, enough of patriotic blood has been need to make a river, and yet in vain. The same tremendous foe to-day confronts us. The most we have done has been to cheek it — when it, in turn, become the invader. By the most corporate fighting we succeeded in harting it back at and at Gettysburg, but in neither of these did we do anything more than best it back. We did not disable it; we did not even cr<
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
red, and yet leave forces amply large enough to meet all the troops that could be mastered against them by the rebels in that quarter of the country. With the aid of the rapidly multiplying negro regiments, whose fighting qualities are now universally acknowledged, it would seem that there could be no question of this ability. of the Western soldiers — some thirty or forty regiments there made up of Eastern man — thus to be thrown, by the Knoxville road, through Eastern Tennessee and Western Virginia, upon Lee's flank, and were the old Army of the Potomac at an early day to be reinforced up to its proper standard by the new draft, it would be physically impossible for Lee to hold out for any long period. Of course he, too, would be to some extent reinforced, as he has been already since the battle of Gettysburg. But the forces and the resources of the Confederacy are now too much reduced to admit of any such contribution to its favorite army as thus lies in our power, in respect t
Sergeant Wm Hodges (search for this): article 8
. The meeting then proceeded to the election of company officers resulting as follows: Company A.--Capt Peter H Whitehurst, 1st Lieut Geo B Fitzgerald, 2d Lieut Robt Butt, 1st Orderly Sergeant R B Lovitt, 2d Orderly Sergeant Daniel Whitchead. Company B.--Capt L W Webb, 1st Lieut Jno H Borum, 2d Lieut C Saunders, 1st Orderly Sergeant Jos Bunkley, 2d Orderly Sergeant Frank Zantzinger. Company C.--Capt Peter Dilworth, 1st Lieut John T Daniels, 2d Lieut Jas Belote, 1st Orderly Sergeant Wm Hodges, 2d Orderly Sergeant Robt Kewen. Company D.--Capt Samuel Frost, 1st Lieut Geo P Kueller, 2d Lieut Thos P Crowell, 1st Orderly Sergeant D C Crowell, 2d Orderly Sergeant Edward C Doming, Quartermaster Edward M Keer, Surgeon Doctor D W Tod. Assistant Surgeon Doctor Z Sykes. James Green, Esq., was unanimously elected Major. This was an excellent choice, as were all the rest. Mr. Green is grandson of Geo. Nathaniel Green, of Revolutionary fame. Dr. Tod is brother of Governor
Americans (search for this): article 8
on, to be composed of citizens of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and vicinity, whose services shall be immediately tendered for the common defence of our beloved though imperilled Union. Mr. Bowden, in eloquently supporting the resolution, was followed by Thos. M. Brown, Esq., in an argumentative and eloquent, though brief, speech, his manly and graceful form harmonizing with the patriotism beaming from his noble countenance, inspiring his hearers with the proper sentiments and feelings of true Americans. On motion of John H. Berum, Esq., the Chair was requested to invite persons to come forward and enroll their names for the four companies to constitute the battalion. In the incredible short space of thirty eight minutes four hundred and twenty five names were obtained. At this stage of the proceedings, the utmost enthusiasm prevailing, James Green, Esq., with his proverbial munificence, came forward and gave a check on the Bank of Virginia for $1,000, to be appropriated to the su
. $300, Dr. Z Sykes, $200, Wm A Mehagen, $200; John Belote, $150; L W Webb, $225; Joseph Bunkley, $170; Samuel Frost, $200; John T Daniels, $280, Frank Zautzinger, $200; Hon Charles H Whitehurst, $100; Thos M Brown, $200; John H Borum, $300; R B Lovitt; $200; D C Crowell, $200; Asa Jennings, $150; George R Fitzgerald, $200; George P Kneller, $100; L Waterfield, $150; Robert Kewen, $200; Magee & Freeman, $200; Peter Dilwock, two hogsheads tobacco, proceeds to be applied. What is more, the greatart was paid immediately or checked for. The meeting then proceeded to the election of company officers resulting as follows: Company A.--Capt Peter H Whitehurst, 1st Lieut Geo B Fitzgerald, 2d Lieut Robt Butt, 1st Orderly Sergeant R B Lovitt, 2d Orderly Sergeant Daniel Whitchead. Company B.--Capt L W Webb, 1st Lieut Jno H Borum, 2d Lieut C Saunders, 1st Orderly Sergeant Jos Bunkley, 2d Orderly Sergeant Frank Zantzinger. Company C.--Capt Peter Dilworth, 1st Lieut John T Daniels,
Judson Bottomore (search for this): article 8
absence, submitted the following ticket, which was unanimously elected; President, Robert Bull, Esq., Portsmouth; 1st Vice President, Peter H. Whitehurst, Esq., Norfolk; 2d Vice-President, Thomas M. Brown, Esq., Norfolk; Recording Secretary, Judson Bottomore, Portsmouth; Treasurer, Robert Kewen, Norfolk. The President, in returning thanks for the honor so unexpectedly and unworthily conferred upon him, spoke in language of burning eloquence concerning the present critical condition of his befrican Church, Butte street, presented by P. H. Whitehurst, Esq., who gives a ball to-night in his beautiful mansion, formerly owned by Commodore James Barron. All the military dignities of the place are invited. Very respectfully, yours, J. Bottomore, Rec. Sec'y Lets Army must be caused — no Headway against the rebellion until that is down The New York Times thinks the "one supreme necessity" of this war is the destruction of Lee's army. Its history has been "mainly cord of su
s Lee's army is now almost the only one of any considerable power existing in the Confederacy, it is the duty of our Government to make, now and henceforth, the destruction of that army its one great purpose. There is but one way to secure this, and that is the concentration of overwhelming forces into Virginia. Our recent successes in the South weet have released from active service an immense number of veteran soldiers. Probably it would not be too much to say that from the armies of Grant, Banke, and Rosecan, sixty thousand men could be spared, and yet leave forces amply large enough to meet all the troops that could be mastered against them by the rebels in that quarter of the country. With the aid of the rapidly multiplying negro regiments, whose fighting qualities are now universally acknowledged, it would seem that there could be no question of this ability. of the Western soldiers — some thirty or forty regiments there made up of Eastern man — thus to be thrown, by th
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