hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John W. Lee 17 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Henrico (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 7 1 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Burnside 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas 5 1 Browse Search
Stanton 4 0 Browse Search
L. B. Robinson 4 0 Browse Search
Campbell 4 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

owd within which immortal souls are launched into eternity without a moment's notice." Now, that is just what the men who resisted the draft were trying to do. Bishop Hughes would have them keep out of a mob in which not a dozen Irishmen of that city were killed, and precipitate them into an assemblage like Meagher's brigade at Fredericksburg, and another Irish brigade at Gettysburg, in which scarcely a soul survived to tell the tale. Nothing could be wiser than the advice of Bishop Hughes, if applied to lawless assemblages of any kind — those on the Potomac and Mississippi, for example, as well as New York. In letters of gold it should be inscribed onupon their credulous people, whom Federal emissaries are entering to America to fight the battles of men who care neither for their bodies no their souls. Let Bishop Hughes, who rests his appear to his hearers upon the danger to their souls from sudden death, prove himself a good shepherd by keeping his flock from the wholesale de
Good advice to the Irish. In Bishop Haghes's address to the Irish of his disease, who were supposed to have borne a conspicuous part in the late in New York, he said, among other things, --"Keep out of the crowd within which immortal souls are launched into eternity without a moment's notice." Now, that is just what the men who resisted the draft were trying to do. Bishop Hughes would have them keep out of a mob in which not a dozen Irishmen of that city were killed, and precipitate them into an assemblage like Meagher's brigade at Fredericksburg, and another Irish brigade at Gettysburg, in which scarcely a soul survived to tell the tale. Nothing could be wiser than the advice of Bishop Hughes, if applied to lawless assemblages of any kind — those on the Potomac and Mississippi, for example, as well as New York. In letters of gold it should be inscribed on every recruiting office in the North, and echoed from every pulpit in Ireland, "Keep out of the crowd within which im
In Bishop Haghes's address to the Irish of his disease, who were supposed to have borne a conspicuous part in the late in New York, he said, among other things, --"Keep out of the crowd within which immortal souls are launched into eternity without a moment's notice." Now, that is just what the men who resisted the draft were trying to do. Bishop Hughes would have them keep out of a mob in which not a dozen Irishmen of that city were killed, and precipitate them into an assemblage like Meagher's brigade at Fredericksburg, and another Irish brigade at Gettysburg, in which scarcely a soul survived to tell the tale. Nothing could be wiser than the advice of Bishop Hughes, if applied to lawless assemblages of any kind — those on the Potomac and Mississippi, for example, as well as New York. In letters of gold it should be inscribed on every recruiting office in the North, and echoed from every pulpit in Ireland, "Keep out of the crowd within which immortal souls are landed into