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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 17, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Two negroes were arrested in New Orleans on the 2d instant for using seditions language against the United States, and insulting Yankee soldiers. Another starved to death, falling dead when asking for a drink of water. James Flick, a highly respectable widower of Rockingham county, Va., committed suicide on the 7th instant by blowing his brains out. He leaves a large family of children.
From Tennessee. Chattanooga, Aug. 14. --Col. Dibrell, commanding Starns's old brigade, of Forrest's old division, was attacked by four thousand mounted Federal at Sparta. The enemy were driven back to McMinnville, badly whipped. Parties from West and Middle Tennessee report extensive recruiting for the Confederate service. The crops are fine and the enemy conciliatory. (?) Capt. Frank Battle, of Carter's Scouts, captured near Nashville on the 5th, is confined in the State prison.
Two negroes were arrested in New Orleans on the 2d instant for using seditions language against the United States, and insulting Yankee soldiers. Another starved to death, falling dead when asking for a drink of water. James Flick, a highly respectable widower of Rockingham county, Va., committed suicide on the 7th instant by blowing his brains out. He leaves a large family of children.
Ferment in the city Post-Office. --We understand the clerks employed in the city Post-Office have held a meeting to set forth their grievances in a series of resolutions, passed nem con, expressive of their indignation in regard to the course the Postmaster-General has pursued towards them, individually and collectively, in his passive indifference to their frequent appeals for an increase of salary. Since the commencement of the war their salaries have not been advanced one cent, while everything else has gone up to enormous rates. Their present salaries, excepting that of the chief clerk, range from fifty to seventy-five dollars a month, while their board bills amount to ninety and one hundred dollars per month! And then their labor is of the most onerous kind, working twelve hours per diem, Sundays and week days.
Spy to be hung. --A letter from Fort Gaines, in Mobile harbor, dated the 8th inst., gives an account of the sentence of death having been passed upon a spy. He is a Captain of the 23d New York regiment, came through our lines at Richmond, Va., and has been spying ever since. He has visited Charleston, Savannah, Chattanooga, and this town, as also nearly every prominent point in the Confederacy. His last visit was to Mobile, where his money gave out, and he then endeavored to procure a position as substitute in one of the companies stationed at Fort Gaines, but the Colonel refused to accept him, not believing him above the conscription age. He then went over to Fort, Morgan, where he was taken as a substitute; about two weeks after, he left his post and started for the Yankees. Pursuit was immediately made, and our men succeeded in catching him about six miles from the fort. Upon his person was found a plan of Forts Gaines and Morgan, giving the strength of the forts and the
Murder of a lady in Mississippi. --The Morton (Miss.) correspondent of the Atlanta Appeal, writing on the 8th inst., gives the following account of a fiendish murder perpetrated recently by the Federal upon the person of a young married lady near the city of Natchez: A Yankee lieutenant and two private soldiers entered the house of the party deceased, who, in the absence of her husband, was the only occupant of the place, demanding where her husband was concealed. She refused to tell him, and at the same time asked what they wanted with him. The Yankee officer told her that what they wanted with him was their business and none of hers, and said that he would give her three minutes to reveal the whereabouts of her husband, and if she did not do so in that time he would take her life. She refused peremptorily, when, the time having expired, the murderer deliberately took-off his scarf, and with the assistance of his men hung her up by the neck in her own house, and left her
Promotions in the army. The following promotions have been made in the army, all to date from the 12th inst., except that of Col. Hunton, which dates from the 8d: Brig. Gen. Wm. Smith, of Va., to be Major General. Brig. Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox, of Ala., to be Major General. Col. Eppa Hunton, of Va., to be Brigadier General. Col. B. G. Humphreys, of Miss., to be Brigadier General.
Convention of North Carolina brigades in Gen. Lee's army — a Rebuke Administered to Unpatriotic citizens at home. A Convention of the North Carolina troops of Gen. Lee's army was held at Orange C. H., on the 13th inst., for the purpose of rebuking the treacherous proceedings of some of the people of the great State who are led on in their folly by a traitorous press called the Standard, published at Raleigh, N. C. The brigades represented in the Convention were those of Gens. Davis, Stuart, Hoke, Lane, Pettigrew, Iverson, Ramseur, Daniel, and Scales. The resolutions adopted by the Convention set forth; in substance: 1st. That our separation from the Northern Government is final and eternal, and that "we do not intend that the action of any portion of our people at home shall so bind our hands as to make further resistance on our part impossible." 2d. That we cannot comprehend the base feeling that would return to the embrace of any enemy who has carried on a war of i
Negro troops turned over to State authorities. In the assault on battery Wagner, on the 18th ult., twenty-four negro soldiers, belonging to the 54th Massachusetts regiment, were captured by our troops. The following letter, published in the Charleston Mercury, will explain itself: Hdq's Dep't of S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Aug. 12, 1863. Col. R. B. Rhett, Jr., Editor of Mercury: In the Mercury of this date you appear to have written under a misapprehension of the facts connected with the present status of the negroes captured in arms on Morris and James Islands, which permit me to state as follows: "The Proclamation of the President, dated December 24th, 1862, directed that all negro slaves captured in arms should beat once delivered to the Executive authorities of the respective States to which they belong, to be dealt with according to the laws of said States." An informal application was made by the State authorities for the negroes capture
the companies stationed at Fort Gaines, but the Colonel refused to accept him, not believing him above the conscription age. He then went over to Fort, Morgan, where he was taken as a substitute; about two weeks after, he left his post and started for the Yankees. Pursuit was immediately made, and our men succeeded in catching him about six miles from the fort. Upon his person was found a plan of Forts Gaines and Morgan, giving the strength of the forts and the number and size of the guns. He was court-martialed and sentenced to death. The sentence has been approved by the President and he will be shot on the 28th inst. After his capture he confessed being a spy, and gave the number of his regiment. The fact of this man being able to go at large for the length of time he evidently was, admonishes us to be careful of all strangers who may come into our lines. If proper vigilance was secured, dozens of spies would be detected giving all the information that leads to our reverses.
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