hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jackson 14 2 Browse Search
Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Logan 10 4 Browse Search
Lincoln 10 0 Browse Search
Danville (Virginia, United States) 9 1 Browse Search
John B. Floyd 9 1 Browse Search
John Lee 9 1 Browse Search
O. F. Johnston 9 1 Browse Search
Rosecrans 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 34 total hits in 18 results.

1 2
Kilkenny (Irish Republic) (search for this): article 13
tant Surgeon; Peter Vandiver, 1st Assistant Engineer; Isaac Patten, Paymaster's Clerk; Mr. Kelly, Nassau Pilot; Chas Smith, and nine of the seamen and firemen. On Thursday at 10 o'clock the two boats that escaped with their crews arrived at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $75,000 and the steamer at $50,000, all owned by the Confederate Government. The Oconee, before the war, was a first-class passenger and freight steamer, in the trade between Charleston, Savannah, and Fernandina, and was under the command of Capt. L. M. Goxetter. Upon the breaking out of the war she was sold to the Confederate Government, and her name was changed to the Savannah. She was the flag-ship of Commodore Tatn
Saint Catherine Sound (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 13
xertions they were enabled to obtain a fire, and it was made along side of a tree, the trunk of which, during the night, was burnt through, and a heavy wind prostrated it, injuring the following persons: Peter Faithful, 3rd Assistant Engineer, skull dangerously fractured; Chas, Smith, seaman, left side of cheek out slightly; Adolphus Moore, cabin boy, (colored,) leg fractured. The wounded having been taken care of, the party at daylight put to sea, and at 19 o'clock made the inlet to St. Catherine Sound. After getting about half a mile inside the mouth of the Sound a Yankee gunboat, schooner rigged propeller, mounting a pivot gun fore and aft and a broadside gun, discovered them and fired a blank cartridge. The men in the coats put all strength to their cars to make their escape. Five minutes after the Yankee blockader fired her blank cartridge she opened her broadside gun on the unfortunate men, firing twenty-seven rounds of shot, shell, and canister. The course of the boat were
Saint Catherines Island (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 13
--The Confederate (Government) steamer Oconee, Lieut. O. F. Johnston commanding, laden with 823 bales of cotton, left Savannah for Nassau on Tuesday week. On Wednesday, at sea, she sprung a leak and went down, her officers and crew taking to the boats. The Republican says: Lieut. Johnston, with his crew, in three boats, made for the land, and discovered it at about three o'clock Wednesday. At six o'clock the boats passed through the breakers and surf, and the party landed on St. Catherine's Island, where they remained all night. By great exertions they were enabled to obtain a fire, and it was made along side of a tree, the trunk of which, during the night, was burnt through, and a heavy wind prostrated it, injuring the following persons: Peter Faithful, 3rd Assistant Engineer, skull dangerously fractured; Chas, Smith, seaman, left side of cheek out slightly; Adolphus Moore, cabin boy, (colored,) leg fractured. The wounded having been taken care of, the party at daylight put
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 13
Loss of a Confederate Cotton steamer. --The Confederate (Government) steamer Oconee, Lieut. O. F. Johnston commanding, laden with 823 bales of cotton, left Savannah for Nassau on Tuesday week. On Wednesday, at sea, she sprung a leak and went down, her officers and crew taking to the boats. The Republican says: Lieut. Johnston, with his crew, in three boats, made for the land, and discovered it at about three o'clock Wednesday. At six o'clock the boats passed through the breakers and surf, and the party landed on St. Catherine's Island, where they remained all night. By great exertions they were enabled to obtain a fire, and it was made along side of a tree, the trunk of which, during the night, was burnt through, and a heavy wind prostrated it, injuring the following persons: Peter Faithful, 3rd Assistant Engineer, skull dangerously fractured; Chas, Smith, seaman, left side of cheek out slightly; Adolphus Moore, cabin boy, (colored,) leg fractured. The wounded having b
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 13
two boats that escaped with their crews arrived at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $75,000 and the steamer at $50,000, all owned by the Confederate Government. The Oconee, before the war, was a first-class passenger and freight steamer, in the trade between Charleston, Savannah, and Fernandina, and was under the command of Capt. L. M. Goxetter. Upon the breaking out of the war she was sold to the Confederate Government, and her name was changed to the Savannah. She was the flag-ship of Commodore Tatnall. Subsequently her name was changed to the Oconee. A correspondent writing to this paper from Savannah says that Edwin Gill, of Richmond, the Chief Engineer of the Oconce, was killed.
made for the land, and discovered it at about three o'clock Wednesday. At six o'clock the boats passed through the breakers and surf, and the party landed on St. Catherine's Island, where they remained all night. By great exertions they were enabled to obtain a fire, and it was made along side of a tree, the trunk of which, during the night, was burnt through, and a heavy wind prostrated it, injuring the following persons: Peter Faithful, 3rd Assistant Engineer, skull dangerously fractured; Chas, Smith, seaman, left side of cheek out slightly; Adolphus Moore, cabin boy, (colored,) leg fractured. The wounded having been taken care of, the party at daylight put to sea, and at 19 o'clock made the inlet to St. Catherine Sound. After getting about half a mile inside the mouth of the Sound a Yankee gunboat, schooner rigged propeller, mounting a pivot gun fore and aft and a broadside gun, discovered them and fired a blank cartridge. The men in the coats put all strength to their cars to
e unfortunate men, firing twenty-seven rounds of shot, shell, and canister. The course of the boat were put north and across the inlet. The third boat, which was in the rear, and distant from the others about half a mile, was cut off and compelled to surrender. The following were in the boat captured: Peter Faithful, 3d Assistant Engineer; Wm. Smith, Master's Mate; ex-officer Dr. Chas. M. Moffat, Assistant Surgeon; Peter Vandiver, 1st Assistant Engineer; Isaac Patten, Paymaster's Clerk; Mr. Kelly, Nassau Pilot; Chas Smith, and nine of the seamen and firemen. On Thursday at 10 o'clock the two boats that escaped with their crews arrived at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $75,000 and the stea
wo boats that escaped with their crews arrived at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $75,000 and the steamer at $50,000, all owned by the Confederate Government. The Oconee, before the war, was a first-class passenger and freight steamer, in the trade between Charleston, Savannah, and Fernandina, and was under the command of Capt. L. M. Goxetter. Upon the breaking out of the war she was sold to the Confederate Government, and her name was changed to the Savannah. She was the flag-ship of Commodore Tatnall. Subsequently her name was changed to the Oconee. A correspondent writing to this paper from Savannah says that Edwin Gill, of Richmond, the Chief Engineer of the Oconce, was killed.
L. M. Goxetter (search for this): article 13
two boats that escaped with their crews arrived at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $75,000 and the steamer at $50,000, all owned by the Confederate Government. The Oconee, before the war, was a first-class passenger and freight steamer, in the trade between Charleston, Savannah, and Fernandina, and was under the command of Capt. L. M. Goxetter. Upon the breaking out of the war she was sold to the Confederate Government, and her name was changed to the Savannah. She was the flag-ship of Commodore Tatnall. Subsequently her name was changed to the Oconee. A correspondent writing to this paper from Savannah says that Edwin Gill, of Richmond, the Chief Engineer of the Oconce, was killed.
O. F. Johnston (search for this): article 13
Loss of a Confederate Cotton steamer. --The Confederate (Government) steamer Oconee, Lieut. O. F. Johnston commanding, laden with 823 bales of cotton, left Savannah for Nassau on Tuesday week. On Wednesday, at sea, she sprung a leak and went down, her officers and crew taking to the boats. The Republican says: Lieut. Lieut. Johnston, with his crew, in three boats, made for the land, and discovered it at about three o'clock Wednesday. At six o'clock the boats passed through the breakers and surf, and the party landed on St. Catherine's Island, where they remained all night. By great exertions they were enabled to obtain a fire, and it was made along ed at Kilkenny. Major E. C. Anderson, Jr., commanding the post, kindly received them.--The whole garrison were unceasing in their efforts to make comfortable Lieut. Johnston and his crew, who had had nothing to cat from the time they abandoned the Sconce until they arrived at Kilkenny. The cargo of the Oconee was valued at $7
1 2