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Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
nce? Would that we might believe that the disgraceful treatment of our Confederate prisoners might arise from individual corruption and not from the Government, of whose sins we, as a representative people, must bear the punishment. But the matter needs probing. "There is something rotten in the State of Denmark." A. New Englander. Rebellious conscripts. A dispatch from Boston says: The officers of the steamer Forest City, which took nearly one thousand conscripts from Long Island to Alexandria, say that frequent threats were made on the passage by the substitutes on board to burn the steamer, but no attempt was made to execute them. On arriving in the Potomac many efforts to escape were made. One man was shot while attempting to swim ashore. Another was discovered in the water boat, a box over his head, and on being picked up was found to have $600 in his belt. After landing, quite a number escaped while on the way to the army in the cars. Dash and darin
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 5
distance of between two and three miles from the Gilmore House. When he reached there he was so utterly exhausted that he dropped to the earth, where he was suffered to lie, without a morsel of food or a drop of water, till the following morning. Well may we exclaim, as we read of the treatment of this gray-haired preacher of the Gospel, "Oh, Christianity, where is thy blush!" If we turn to the treatment of wounded prisoners in our hospitals, shame must mantle our checks when Fort. Delaware is brought to our recollection. Between ten and eleven thousand prisoners are there confined, and these have been dying at the rate of from seven to fifteen per day, because compelled to drink the brackish ditch water, which insures disease and almost certain death. Such strong representations have been made by Federal surgeons of the brutality of this measure that some water is now daily brought from the Brandywine, though not near enough to supply the prisoners. There is not a sheet or
David's Island, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
ks of their foes? In the Baltimore jail eight hundred and fifty men were compelled to take the cold stone flagging as their only bed, till the Federal surgeon stated that they would inevitably be disabled by rheumatism for life if this course were continued. There are some bright spots in this picture of wrong, injustice, and sin, and yet we scarcely dare to direct attention to them lest they, too, should lose their sunlight and become involved in gloom. At Chester, Pa., and at David's Island, N. Y., the sick and wounded prisoners are allowed comforts and even delicacies. What can cause the difference? Would that we might believe that the disgraceful treatment of our Confederate prisoners might arise from individual corruption and not from the Government, of whose sins we, as a representative people, must bear the punishment. But the matter needs probing. "There is something rotten in the State of Denmark." A. New Englander. Rebellious conscripts. A dispatch from
Chester, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
never again swell the ranks of their foes? In the Baltimore jail eight hundred and fifty men were compelled to take the cold stone flagging as their only bed, till the Federal surgeon stated that they would inevitably be disabled by rheumatism for life if this course were continued. There are some bright spots in this picture of wrong, injustice, and sin, and yet we scarcely dare to direct attention to them lest they, too, should lose their sunlight and become involved in gloom. At Chester, Pa., and at David's Island, N. Y., the sick and wounded prisoners are allowed comforts and even delicacies. What can cause the difference? Would that we might believe that the disgraceful treatment of our Confederate prisoners might arise from individual corruption and not from the Government, of whose sins we, as a representative people, must bear the punishment. But the matter needs probing. "There is something rotten in the State of Denmark." A. New Englander. Rebellious conscri
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
Glenn, who was arrested on the merest suspicion and sent South without even being allowed a servant to lead him. Although forced to go to City Point he refused to take the oath of allegiance to the South, claiming that he was a citizen of the United States, and was, consequently, sent back to the tender mercies of General Schenck, who has not yet decided what further cruelties are in store for him. The case of the causeless turning out of doors of Col. Waring and his family is familiar to ant of the Rev. Mr. Harrison, the father-in-law of the Rev. Dr. Hoge, and brother-in-law of the Rev. Dr. Backus, the well-known Union clergyman of a Presbyterian Church in Baltimore. This reverend gentleman pays large taxes on property in the United States; but upon being asked if he had property in Virginia, and answering in the affirmative, he was required to make out a list of it that it might be taxed also. On presenting it to the official he made the remark that it seemed rather hard that
Pascagoula (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 5
oon. A correspondent of the New York News, writing from New Orleans on the 13th ult., says: Mobile is going to be attacked in a formidable manner. Another corps of the army from Gen. Grant arrived here yesterday.--This corps numbers about 27,000 men, and, with the two divisions which came down a few days ago, united with the 6,000 escaped men of Gen. Banks's expedition, will make quite a respectable force of about 40,000 men. It is said that these armies are going to Mobile, via Pascagoula, while another and not less considerable army is going to operate from some other way, such as Pensacola, and in the rear of Mobile. It is reported that Gen. Sherman, seeing that he could not easily force his way through Johnston's army, has decided to take another road on foot, along the river, up to a certain distance, so as to flank the Confederates and proceed to Mobile. It is said that he is already at Natchez, starting the movement.--We may therefore hear soon that the city is
Denmark, Madison co., Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
sunlight and become involved in gloom. At Chester, Pa., and at David's Island, N. Y., the sick and wounded prisoners are allowed comforts and even delicacies. What can cause the difference? Would that we might believe that the disgraceful treatment of our Confederate prisoners might arise from individual corruption and not from the Government, of whose sins we, as a representative people, must bear the punishment. But the matter needs probing. "There is something rotten in the State of Denmark." A. New Englander. Rebellious conscripts. A dispatch from Boston says: The officers of the steamer Forest City, which took nearly one thousand conscripts from Long Island to Alexandria, say that frequent threats were made on the passage by the substitutes on board to burn the steamer, but no attempt was made to execute them. On arriving in the Potomac many efforts to escape were made. One man was shot while attempting to swim ashore. Another was discovered in the water
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
cts in his department — treatment of the Confederate wounded. A Baltimore correspondent of the New York Times, under the caption "Are we a Christian People?" has a long review of the official conduct of Major General Schenck, commanding the department of Maryland. He says: No one has denied or attempted to palliate his course in regard to John Glenn, who was arrested on the merest suspicion and sent South without even being allowed a servant to lead him. Although forced to go to City Point he refused to take the oath of allegiance to the South, claiming that he was a citizen of the United States, and was, consequently, sent back to the tender mercies of General Schenck, who has not yet decided what further cruelties are in store for him. The case of the causeless turning out of doors of Col. Waring and his family is familiar to all, and his recent exploit of arresting all the mourners quickly attending the burial of a Confederate officer, and marching them through the st
Windsor (Canada) (search for this): article 5
bably would receive an armament and be ready to proceed to sea within a week. She is larger than the Alabama or Florida, and appeared to be very fast. The writer thinks she may be the steamer known as the Southerner. The Siphon and the Minnesota were the only efficient vessels off the port, the Iroquois having left a week previous in chase of a blockade runner. Miscellaneous. The schooner Ambridge, formerly of the Baltimore line, has been fitted out as a "pirate" by the Confederates; and is now in the China seas, commanded by Capt. M. F. G. Key, of Baltimore, who is described by the Yankee correspondents as "an out and out Southerner, who flies the rebel flag and fires a salute every time he hoists his colors." The vessel is said to be an ugly customer to catch. The Germans of New York city are to hold a Convention next week to arrange for testing the constitutionality of the dealt. Hon. C. L. Vallandigham and his wife are at Windsor, Canada, opposite Detroit.
Who can ever point the fearful sufferings of the Confederate wounded at Gettysburg, where they lay in pools of water on the battle-field, with no shelter save a little canvas stretched upon uprights, parched with thirst, famishing for food, and delirious from unattended wounds. Our New York papers, religious and secular, told of their sufferings with shuddering of horror, but stated, as an excuse, that our own enormous losses required even more than all our surgeons in attendance, and that Gen. Lee left only four surgeons and a few nurses in care of his five thousand wounded men. Let them take pains to get at the truth, and they will ascertain that he detailed fifty surgeons, with one nurse for every five of his wounded and let it be known that these were actually marched off to swell the ranks of prisoners. --Should they not have been considered noncombatants by all the rules of war? Or, if captured as prisoners, might they not, at least, have been allowed to assuage the anguish o
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