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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
near being abandoned by her crew. The Ottawa has thrown 80,000 pounds of shot and shell, and burned 11,000 pounds of powder. The Courier, of Monday, gives us a history of the operations of the enemy on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. During Friday night and Saturday the shelling from the enemy's land batteries was unusually slow, our James Island batteries, however, keeping up a constant and vigorous fire in reply. It says: Until yesterday no formidable attack has been made on fort Sumter since the attack of the monitors on Sunday morning, the 26th inst. That attack was short in duration, but the fire very accurate, and owing to causes we trust now removed, very dangerous. It may not be indiscreet to mention in general terms the fact that had the fire been continued in all probability the magazine would have soon been made unsafe, or had an early renewal of the attack taken place the fort might have been blown up. The monitors, however, drew off. Seven days have since ela
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
to examine its condition and report whether it was capable of defence. They proceeded to the fort, and after a thorough examination, (the fort being under fire at the time,) reported that it was susceptible of defence for an indefinite period. General Beauregard then called for volunteers to defend that fortification. To this call there was an immediate response from more men than was necessary. The following is an official order relative to the garrison of Sumter: Headq'rs Dep't S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Aug. 27, 1863. General: The Commanding General has witnessed with genuine pride and satisfaction the defence made of Fort Sumter by Col. Rhett, his officers, and the men of the First Regiment of South Carolina regular artillery, noble fruits of the discipline, application to their duties, and the soldierly bearing of officers and men, and of the organization of the regiment. In the annals of war no stouter defence was ever made and no work ever befor
Oyster Point, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 7
indiscreet to mention in general terms the fact that had the fire been continued in all probability the magazine would have soon been made unsafe, or had an early renewal of the attack taken place the fort might have been blown up. The monitors, however, drew off. Seven days have since elapsed, and the powder since then placed beyond danger. About half-past 4 yesterday afternoon battery Chives opened on a side wheel steamship transport loaded with troops. The troops were landed at Oyster Point. The enemy were also observed landing heavy guns from a propeller. The firing Sunday afternoon was kept up regularly between the enemy's batteries and fort Moultrie, batteries Chives, Haskell and Wagner. The Yankees are reported working continually and cautiously on an advanced battery at the rifle pits, and yesterday afternoon kept up a steady fire from one Parrott gun. Later in the day, however, they had succeeded in getting two more in position, and at last accounts had opened a
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
their base," either to the upper portion of the city or to the country Fortunately, there are many vacant houses up town, and there has been no serious difficulty in procuring accommodations in that quarter. The race course, I learn, has become quite a populous little village, many of the poorer people having fled there for safety from the shells. The weather is still unsettled, and the frequent showers anything but comfortable to the troops who are bivouacking on the island. The Atlanta Confederacy learns from a credible source that since the damage sustained by Fort Sumter, General Beauregard sent a commission composed of Engineers to examine its condition and report whether it was capable of defence. They proceeded to the fort, and after a thorough examination, (the fort being under fire at the time,) reported that it was susceptible of defence for an indefinite period. General Beauregard then called for volunteers to defend that fortification. To this call there was
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
The siege of Charleston. The general impression communicated both by the Charleston papers and by the Yankee correspondents from the scene is that some night this week the iron-clads intend attempting to burst through the obstructions and get into the firmer harbor. The letter bag of the United States gunboat Ottawa, with letters to friends at home, dated as late as the 29th instant, floated ashore on Saturday night, and is in possession of our officers. The Mercury says: By letters from the Captain (Lt. Commanding Wm. Whitney) to his wife, and by those of other officers, we are informed that the Yankees have entertained the idea of breaking up our harbor obstructions by night operations, and actually made the attempt last Wednesday night with their monitors and two gunboats, of which the Ottawa was one "Violent squalls of rain and wind" are given as a reason for their having turned back before reaching the obstructions, of which our Yankee neighbors have apparently so wh
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
int. The enemy were also observed landing heavy guns from a propeller. The firing Sunday afternoon was kept up regularly between the enemy's batteries and fort Moultrie, batteries Chives, Haskell and Wagner. The Yankees are reported working continually and cautiously on an advanced battery at the rifle pits, and yesterday aftdoubt. This, the second attempt, is under more favorable circumstances. Sumter is out of the way, or at least so weak as weak as to inspire little fear. Fort Moultrie can be passed at a distance of nearly, if not quite, a mile, and her fire and that of battery Bee should not be very dangerous to the monitors. Battery Gregg,n the latter attempt, and only succeeded in getting foul of the frigate's ram, which stopped her for a moment. She finally got off and started rapidly towards Fort Moultrie. Several guns were fired from the frigate's at her, but it was thought none struck the audacious vessel, as she went off flying. The Swamp Angel Speaks t
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
discovered what he supposed to be one of the monitors moving rapidly down the channel and towards his ship, the new Ironsides. He watched it closely as it neared him, and soon saw enough to excite his suspicion that all was not right. When she had come within speaking distance he called her and asked what vessel it was. The reply came, "Ay, ay, sir; all right." As this was not the proper answer to be given by any of our vessels he hailed again. The next answer was, "A live Yankee from Port Royal." He was then satisfied that she was a rebel vessel, and he called all hands to quarters.--The strange vessel continued to move towards the Ironsides, and attempted to cross her bows or explode a torpedo against her sides. But she failed in the latter attempt, and only succeeded in getting foul of the frigate's ram, which stopped her for a moment. She finally got off and started rapidly towards Fort Moultrie. Several guns were fired from the frigate's at her, but it was thought none str
e fort might have been blown up. The monitors, however, drew off. Seven days have since elapsed, and the powder since then placed beyond danger. About half-past 4 yesterday afternoon battery Chives opened on a side wheel steamship transport loaded with troops. The troops were landed at Oyster Point. The enemy were also observed landing heavy guns from a propeller. The firing Sunday afternoon was kept up regularly between the enemy's batteries and fort Moultrie, batteries Chives, Haskell and Wagner. The Yankees are reported working continually and cautiously on an advanced battery at the rifle pits, and yesterday afternoon kept up a steady fire from one Parrott gun. Later in the day, however, they had succeeded in getting two more in position, and at last accounts had opened a heavy fire on battery Wagner from three Parrott guns. Out of a little over eight hundred shots from the four Yankee batteries fired at Fort Sumter yesterday, hardly one hundred struck the fort,
racticable, without much danger from its fire. At all events, we have inflicted enough damage upon the fort to justify us in regarding it as practically reduced, and incapable of inflicting serious harm upon a fleet. If the navy cannot now pass the work, we may as well regard that arm of the service as of little value. The long looked for moment will soon arrive when a second attempt to pass it by our iron-clads will be made. The first, on the 7th of April last, by the squadron under Admiral Dupont, although one of brilliant dash, boldness, and vigor, failed for reasons well known to the public. They were not owing to any lack of courage, skill, or determination on his part, or on the part of the gallant officers who so manfully supported him, but solely to the vessels themselves, several individuals to the contrary not withstanding. Of this no one who knows the circumstances of the case can doubt. This, the second attempt, is under more favorable circumstances. Sumter is o
t have been blown up. The monitors, however, drew off. Seven days have since elapsed, and the powder since then placed beyond danger. About half-past 4 yesterday afternoon battery Chives opened on a side wheel steamship transport loaded with troops. The troops were landed at Oyster Point. The enemy were also observed landing heavy guns from a propeller. The firing Sunday afternoon was kept up regularly between the enemy's batteries and fort Moultrie, batteries Chives, Haskell and Wagner. The Yankees are reported working continually and cautiously on an advanced battery at the rifle pits, and yesterday afternoon kept up a steady fire from one Parrott gun. Later in the day, however, they had succeeded in getting two more in position, and at last accounts had opened a heavy fire on battery Wagner from three Parrott guns. Out of a little over eight hundred shots from the four Yankee batteries fired at Fort Sumter yesterday, hardly one hundred struck the fort, all the rest
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