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Later from Europe. The steamship Africa, with dates from Liverpool to the 23d, arrived at Halifax on the 1st inst. The following is a summary of the news. The Army and Navy Gazette says: It is gratifying to know that the Government is not blind to the danger of difficulties with America, nor is it indifferent to the perils of a rupture, which we trust the good sense of all respectable Americans will aid us in averting. The same journal adds: It is with no wish to flatter the great republican tyranny which is now raising its head on the North American continent that we again record our conviction of the ultimate success of the military means the North has set to work to crush the heroic efforts of the South. If Gen. Lee is now able to give one knockdown blow to the Federals and seize Washington, or even if he should rout the Army of the Potomac, the effect will be so great that another year will be gained, and with it who knows what gain, may be obtained fo
28. The German Congress still continues in session. The King of Prussia persists in refusing to attend it. The United States Consul at Frankfort had displayed the Mexican flag. The Europe, of that city, explains that it was in pursuance of an arrangement by which, in case of the overthrow of Republican authority in Mexico, President Lincoln would allow Mexico to be represented in foreign countries by agents of the Washington Government. The Europe refers to the fact that, in March last, Secretary Seward declared that President Lincoln and his Cabinet would never tolerate a monarchical Government in Mexico, and it anticipates an immediate war if the Emperor of France does not confine himself to the demand for indemnity and leave Mexico a Republic. Nothing is known of the movements of the rebel privateer Florida since she was last seen off Tusear, on the evening of the 20th of August. Speculations have been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British
August 20th (search for this): article 4
es by agents of the Washington Government. The Europe refers to the fact that, in March last, Secretary Seward declared that President Lincoln and his Cabinet would never tolerate a monarchical Government in Mexico, and it anticipates an immediate war if the Emperor of France does not confine himself to the demand for indemnity and leave Mexico a Republic. Nothing is known of the movements of the rebel privateer Florida since she was last seen off Tusear, on the evening of the 20th of August. Speculations have been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British waters. One report is that it was for the purpose of taking on board Mr. Mason, who is about returning to the South. Mr. Mason, it is announced, had gone to Ireland on a visit to Earl Donoughmore. It was announced by the last steamer that the ship Eagle had arrived at Liverpool, from Bermuda, with the silver bars taken out of the American ship B. F. Hoxie by the Florida. The Shipping Gazette says it
August 21st (search for this): article 4
Confederates. But should Gen. Lee remain inactive, or permit the Federal armies to sweep around into his rear — to flood the Confederacy and overlap all his communications — Richmond may become a mere capet morturn, and the South and all be lost. The London Globe regards peace as still distant, but the issue not doubtful. It says that the South may be mangled and exhausted, but must win in the end, temporary defeats to the contrary notwithstanding. The Confederate loan on the 21st of August rallied one per cent., closing at 26a28. The German Congress still continues in session. The King of Prussia persists in refusing to attend it. The United States Consul at Frankfort had displayed the Mexican flag. The Europe, of that city, explains that it was in pursuance of an arrangement by which, in case of the overthrow of Republican authority in Mexico, President Lincoln would allow Mexico to be represented in foreign countries by agents of the Washington Government.
August 22nd (search for this): article 4
e been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British waters. One report is that it was for the purpose of taking on board Mr. Mason, who is about returning to the South. Mr. Mason, it is announced, had gone to Ireland on a visit to Earl Donoughmore. It was announced by the last steamer that the ship Eagle had arrived at Liverpool, from Bermuda, with the silver bars taken out of the American ship B. F. Hoxie by the Florida. The Shipping Gazette says it is reported that the silver bars will be restored to the original consignees. The silver was shipped by an English house, insured in London to the full amount. It is also stated that the commander of the Florida, on hearing of this act, resolved to restore it to the rightful owners. The London Times, of the 22d of August, publishes long extracts from the correspondence between the Governments of England and America, touching restrictions on trade between the Northern ports of the United States and the Bahamas.
Americans (search for this): article 4
Later from Europe. The steamship Africa, with dates from Liverpool to the 23d, arrived at Halifax on the 1st inst. The following is a summary of the news. The Army and Navy Gazette says: It is gratifying to know that the Government is not blind to the danger of difficulties with America, nor is it indifferent to the perils of a rupture, which we trust the good sense of all respectable Americans will aid us in averting. The same journal adds: It is with no wish to flatter the great republican tyranny which is now raising its head on the North American continent that we again record our conviction of the ultimate success of the military means the North has set to work to crush the heroic efforts of the South. If Gen. Lee is now able to give one knockdown blow to the Federals and seize Washington, or even if he should rout the Army of the Potomac, the effect will be so great that another year will be gained, and with it who knows what gain, may be obtained fo
great republican tyranny which is now raising its head on the North American continent that we again record our conviction of the ultimate success of the military means the North has set to work to crush the heroic efforts of the South. If Gen. Lee is now able to give one knockdown blow to the Federals and seize Washington, or even if he should rout the Army of the Potomac, the effect will be so great that another year will be gained, and with it who knows what gain, may be obtained for the Confederates. But should Gen. Lee remain inactive, or permit the Federal armies to sweep around into his rear — to flood the Confederacy and overlap all his communications — Richmond may become a mere capet morturn, and the South and all be lost. The London Globe regards peace as still distant, but the issue not doubtful. It says that the South may be mangled and exhausted, but must win in the end, temporary defeats to the contrary notwithstanding. The Confederate loan on the 21st
A. Lincoln (search for this): article 4
ng to attend it. The United States Consul at Frankfort had displayed the Mexican flag. The Europe, of that city, explains that it was in pursuance of an arrangement by which, in case of the overthrow of Republican authority in Mexico, President Lincoln would allow Mexico to be represented in foreign countries by agents of the Washington Government. The Europe refers to the fact that, in March last, Secretary Seward declared that President Lincoln and his Cabinet would never tolerate President Lincoln and his Cabinet would never tolerate a monarchical Government in Mexico, and it anticipates an immediate war if the Emperor of France does not confine himself to the demand for indemnity and leave Mexico a Republic. Nothing is known of the movements of the rebel privateer Florida since she was last seen off Tusear, on the evening of the 20th of August. Speculations have been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British waters. One report is that it was for the purpose of taking on board Mr. Mason, who is about r
l privateer Florida since she was last seen off Tusear, on the evening of the 20th of August. Speculations have been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British waters. One report is that it was for the purpose of taking on board Mr. Mason, who is about returning to the South. Mr. Mason, it is announced, had gone to Ireland on a visit to Earl Donoughmore. It was announced by the last steamer that the ship Eagle had arrived at Liverpool, from Bermuda, with the silver bars taMr. Mason, it is announced, had gone to Ireland on a visit to Earl Donoughmore. It was announced by the last steamer that the ship Eagle had arrived at Liverpool, from Bermuda, with the silver bars taken out of the American ship B. F. Hoxie by the Florida. The Shipping Gazette says it is reported that the silver bars will be restored to the original consignees. The silver was shipped by an English house, insured in London to the full amount. It is also stated that the commander of the Florida, on hearing of this act, resolved to restore it to the rightful owners. The London Times, of the 22d of August, publishes long extracts from the correspondence between the Governments of Englan
an Congress still continues in session. The King of Prussia persists in refusing to attend it. The United States Consul at Frankfort had displayed the Mexican flag. The Europe, of that city, explains that it was in pursuance of an arrangement by which, in case of the overthrow of Republican authority in Mexico, President Lincoln would allow Mexico to be represented in foreign countries by agents of the Washington Government. The Europe refers to the fact that, in March last, Secretary Seward declared that President Lincoln and his Cabinet would never tolerate a monarchical Government in Mexico, and it anticipates an immediate war if the Emperor of France does not confine himself to the demand for indemnity and leave Mexico a Republic. Nothing is known of the movements of the rebel privateer Florida since she was last seen off Tusear, on the evening of the 20th of August. Speculations have been afloat as to the object of the Florida's visit to British waters. One repor
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