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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 15, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 17
A heavy Loser. --Edmund McGence, Esq., about eighty years of age, residing near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been stripped of his immense property by the Yankees. He owned 3,200 slaves and twenty-seven cotton and sugar plantations, including a cotton factory, which was worked by 300 of his own hands. A railroad thirty-one miles long leading to his factory, had been constructed by himself, with a sufficient rolling stock.--All the negroes, except about one hundred, have been taken off by the Federals, his factory ruined, all his plantations desolated, his railroad torn up, and about 5,000 bags of cotton burnt by the orders of Mr. McGence to prevent its falling into the bands of the enemy. His loss in negroes and cotton alone is not less than $6,000,000.
Edmund McGence (search for this): article 17
A heavy Loser. --Edmund McGence, Esq., about eighty years of age, residing near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been stripped of his immense property by the Yankees. He owned 3,200 slaves and twenty-seven cotton and sugar plantations, including a cotton factory, which was worked by 300 of his own hands. A railroad thirty-one miles long leading to his factory, had been constructed by himself, with a sufficient rolling stock.--All the negroes, except about one hundred, have been taken off by tas worked by 300 of his own hands. A railroad thirty-one miles long leading to his factory, had been constructed by himself, with a sufficient rolling stock.--All the negroes, except about one hundred, have been taken off by the Federals, his factory ruined, all his plantations desolated, his railroad torn up, and about 5,000 bags of cotton burnt by the orders of Mr. McGence to prevent its falling into the bands of the enemy. His loss in negroes and cotton alone is not less than $6,000,000.