hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 32 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Bragg 23 1 Browse Search
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 15 1 Browse Search
Rosecrans 14 0 Browse Search
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
McPherson 7 1 Browse Search
E. B. Robinson 7 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 21, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 507 total hits in 218 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
[Extract]Adjutant & Inspector Gen's office,Richmond, Sept. 11th 1863. Special Orders, No. 216.-- XXVI. Major J. W. Mallett, P.A.C.S. Artillery, heretofore assigned to duty in the Ordnance Department, is hereby officially announced as Superintendent C. S. Laboratories of the Ordnance Department, with headquarters at Macon, Ga. By command of the Secretary of War. Jno. Withers, Assistant Adjutant General. se 12--1w
September 11th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 5
[Extract]Adjutant & Inspector Gen's office,Richmond, Sept. 11th 1863. Special Orders, No. 216.-- XXVI. Major J. W. Mallett, P.A.C.S. Artillery, heretofore assigned to duty in the Ordnance Department, is hereby officially announced as Superintendent C. S. Laboratories of the Ordnance Department, with headquarters at Macon, Ga. By command of the Secretary of War. Jno. Withers, Assistant Adjutant General. se 12--1w
Jonathan Withers (search for this): article 5
[Extract]Adjutant & Inspector Gen's office,Richmond, Sept. 11th 1863. Special Orders, No. 216.-- XXVI. Major J. W. Mallett, P.A.C.S. Artillery, heretofore assigned to duty in the Ordnance Department, is hereby officially announced as Superintendent C. S. Laboratories of the Ordnance Department, with headquarters at Macon, Ga. By command of the Secretary of War. Jno. Withers, Assistant Adjutant General. se 12--1w
J. W. Mallett (search for this): article 5
[Extract]Adjutant & Inspector Gen's office,Richmond, Sept. 11th 1863. Special Orders, No. 216.-- XXVI. Major J. W. Mallett, P.A.C.S. Artillery, heretofore assigned to duty in the Ordnance Department, is hereby officially announced as Superintendent C. S. Laboratories of the Ordnance Department, with headquarters at Macon, Ga. By command of the Secretary of War. Jno. Withers, Assistant Adjutant General. se 12--1w
C. S. Laboratories (search for this): article 5
[Extract]Adjutant & Inspector Gen's office,Richmond, Sept. 11th 1863. Special Orders, No. 216.-- XXVI. Major J. W. Mallett, P.A.C.S. Artillery, heretofore assigned to duty in the Ordnance Department, is hereby officially announced as Superintendent C. S. Laboratories of the Ordnance Department, with headquarters at Macon, Ga. By command of the Secretary of War. Jno. Withers, Assistant Adjutant General. se 12--1w
ten hastily immediately on our arrival here, the surrender of Cumberland Gap was alluded to. Since that time I have met with several of the garrison who escaped from that place — some of them after the surrender — from whom the following particulars are obtained: On Wednesday morning, the 7th inst., the enemy made their appearance at the Gap, and before one o'clock P. M. of the same day our forces, amounting to about 2,000 men, surrendered unconditionally. They were under the command of General Fraser, as previously stated. It is said that some 200 of Slemp's 64th Va. infantry made their escape, refusing to surrender, together with several hundred others. Among the batteries captured was Leyden's battery, said to be one of the most splendid batteries in the service. It was presented to our Government by the merchants of Liverpool. We also lost a large amount of arms, stores, equipage, &c. The affair is regarded here as one of the most disgraceful occurrences of the war, and the co
From Tennessee.[from our own correspondent.] Bristol, Tenn, Sept. 17, 1863. In my letter last evening, which was written hastily immediately on our arrival here, the surrender of Cumberland Gap was alluded to. Since that time I have met with several of the garrison who escaped from that place — some of them after the surrender — from whom the following particulars are obtained: On Wednesday morning, the 7th inst., the enemy made their appearance at the Gap, and before one o'clock P. M. of the same day our forces, amounting to about 2,000 men, surrendered unconditionally. They were under the command of General Fraser, as previously stated. It is said that some 200 of Slemp's 64th Va. infantry made their escape, refusing to surrender, together with several hundred others. Among the batteries captured was Leyden's battery, said to be one of the most splendid batteries in the service. It was presented to our Government by the merchants of Liverpool. We also lost a large
September 17th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
From Tennessee.[from our own correspondent.] Bristol, Tenn, Sept. 17, 1863. In my letter last evening, which was written hastily immediately on our arrival here, the surrender of Cumberland Gap was alluded to. Since that time I have met with several of the garrison who escaped from that place — some of them after the surrender — from whom the following particulars are obtained: On Wednesday morning, the 7th inst., the enemy made their appearance at the Gap, and before one o'clock P. M. of the same day our forces, amounting to about 2,000 men, surrendered unconditionally. They were under the command of General Fraser, as previously stated. It is said that some 200 of Slemp's 64th Va. infantry made their escape, refusing to surrender, together with several hundred others. Among the batteries captured was Leyden's battery, said to be one of the most splendid batteries in the service. It was presented to our Government by the merchants of Liverpool. We also lost a large
umberland Gap was alluded to. Since that time I have met with several of the garrison who escaped from that place — some of them after the surrender — from whom the following particulars are obtained: On Wednesday morning, the 7th inst., the enemy made their appearance at the Gap, and before one o'clock P. M. of the same day our forces, amounting to about 2,000 men, surrendered unconditionally. They were under the command of General Fraser, as previously stated. It is said that some 200 of Slemp's 64th Va. infantry made their escape, refusing to surrender, together with several hundred others. Among the batteries captured was Leyden's battery, said to be one of the most splendid batteries in the service. It was presented to our Government by the merchants of Liverpool. We also lost a large amount of arms, stores, equipage, &c. The affair is regarded here as one of the most disgraceful occurrences of the war, and the commander of the post is severely censured. It is represented b
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Tennessee.[from our own correspondent.] Bristol, Tenn, Sept. 17, 1863. In my letter last evening, which was written hastily immediately on our arrival here, the surrender of Cumberland Gap was alluded to. Since that time I have met with several of the garrison who escaped from that place — some of them after the surrender — from whom the following particulars are obtained: On Wednesday morning, the 7th inst., the enemy made their appearance at the Gap, and before one o'clock mated by some as high as 8,000. The first estimate I am disposed, however, to credit. As to the probable consequences of the surrender it is hardly necessary to speak, as the advantages gained will depend greatly on the result of affairs in East Tennessee. This morning we have the report that the enemy have fallen back to Greenville, Tenn., and that our pickets are within five miles of that place. They will doubtless be driven back to Knoxville in a few days. As the train is about to le
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...