hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Rosecrans 24 4 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 24 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
France (France) 16 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 12 0 Browse Search
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 12 2 Browse Search
William Forrest 12 0 Browse Search
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 22, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 11 total hits in 8 results.

Nicholas lane (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 3
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
Zachariah Charles Pearson (search for this): article 3
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take p
L. Seymour (search for this): article 3
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
Streatfeild (search for this): article 3
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
October 29th (search for this): article 3
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl
A Gigantic Bankruptcy. --In the London Court of Bankruptcy, on the 27th ult., Zachariah Charles Pearson, of Nicholas Lane, Lombard street, and of Kingston-upon-Hull (trading under the title of Z. C. Pearson & Co.,) came upon his adjourned examination. This was one of the largest failures which ever came into the Court, not excepting the Royal British Bank, or the great speculations in leather, Messrs. Lawrence, Streatfeild & Mortimore. The debts were more than £645,000, and the deficit acknowledged to be £213,574. The bankrupt's speculations were various — from a sale of the celebrated vessel, the Merrimac, for £131,785, to £1764 of acceptances to Mr. L. Seymour on account of the Southern Times. The case was adjourned for examination of accounts till October 29th, when the meeting for the final order will take pl