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Catoosa (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
e vigorous movements of Bragg, from whom he expected only a feeble resistance. Even as late as Sunday morning, when the Confederates deployed on the west bank of the Chickamauga, he was hardly prepared for a serious attack from an army which he supposed would be only too glad to effect its escape. The great battle was fought on the west bank of the Chickamauga on Sunday, the 20th day of September. The line of battle extended east and west across the boundary line between Walker and Catoosa counties, resting here and there on the bends in the Chickamauga river, a very crooked stream, running east and northeast and emptying into the Tennessee above Chattanooga. D. H. Hill commanded on the right, Polk in the centre, and Longstreet on the left. The command of Longstreet was composed of such of the brigades of Hood's and McLaws's divisions as had come up, and Hindman's, Preston's, Stewart's, and Bushrod Johnson's divisions of the army of Tennessee. The three last constituting the co
Walker County (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
surprised by the vigorous movements of Bragg, from whom he expected only a feeble resistance. Even as late as Sunday morning, when the Confederates deployed on the west bank of the Chickamauga, he was hardly prepared for a serious attack from an army which he supposed would be only too glad to effect its escape. The great battle was fought on the west bank of the Chickamauga on Sunday, the 20th day of September. The line of battle extended east and west across the boundary line between Walker and Catoosa counties, resting here and there on the bends in the Chickamauga river, a very crooked stream, running east and northeast and emptying into the Tennessee above Chattanooga. D. H. Hill commanded on the right, Polk in the centre, and Longstreet on the left. The command of Longstreet was composed of such of the brigades of Hood's and McLaws's divisions as had come up, and Hindman's, Preston's, Stewart's, and Bushrod Johnson's divisions of the army of Tennessee. The three last con
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ver fought better; nor did any other troops upon any other battle-field ever conduct themselves with higher courage or more distinguished gallantry. Longstreet's veterans and Bragg's braves entered into a generous rivalry, and each strove to set an example of daring and to out do the other. The one rushed to the conflict with their old battle flags, bearing upon their ample folds the inscriptions of the first and second "Manassas," "Seven Pines," "Malvern Hill," "Fredericksburg," and "Chancellorsville," and fully resolved to wave those glorious standards in triumph over a Western, as they had already done over an Eastern, foe. The other, conscious of their own manhood, and yielding to none in high resolve and dauntless courage, yet stung by the memory of former disasters, went upon the field with their minds and hearts fully made up never to quit it but as victors, nor until they had proven to all the world that they were the worthy brothers of the heroes of the Chickahominy and the
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 1
, swelling with confidence and pride, who lately invaded that powerful State, threatening to overrun her territory and devastate her homes, has been defeated and forced to seek refuge behind barricades and breast works along the banks of the Tennessee river. Let every heart in all our suffering land give thanks to Almighty God for His great kindness for this signal deliverance. Having been detained on the route, I arrived upon the field too late to witness the battle. I am also almost whted to the care of the wounded, the burial of the dead, and the gathering up of the arms and other trophies of the battle. The enemy withdrew to Missionary Ridge Sunday night, and on Monday night continued his retreat to Chattanooga and the Tennessee river. Yesterday the Confederates followed up and took position in front of the town, where they still remain. The Federals are crouching on the river bank behind entrenchments, and are busily engaged in erecting additional defences. They have
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
t's divisions arrived in time to take part in the fight, but they were a host within themselves. They were Benning's, Law's, and Robertson's brigades, of Hood's division, and Kershaw's and Humphrey's brigades, of McLaw's. But let us proceed with the battle. It is already known that General Bragg deemed it prudent to withdraw his forces from Chattanooga and East Tennessee, and to retire into the State of Georgia, and there await reinforcements. The enemy's cavalry penetrated as far as Ringgold and Tunnel Hill, on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, our own cavalry, unfortunately, setting fire to the bridges as they retreated. Several affairs between outposts followed on Thursday and Friday, the 17th and 18th inst., and on the 19th a heavy skirmish ensued, amounting almost, if not quite, to a general battle, in which Hood and his veterans displayed great spirit and resolution. Gen. Bragg advanced upon the enemy, driving in his outposts and skirmishers, and gaining important advan
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
ds of colors. Among our own casualties were several general and field officers, including Brig.-Gens. Preston Smith and Deishler killed, Maj.-Gen. Hood badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Dan. Adams severely wounded and in the hands of the enemy. Brig.-Gen. Benning received a slight wound, though he still remains in the saddle. Monday was devoted to the care of the wounded, the burial of the dead, and the gathering up of the arms and other trophies of the battle. The enemy withdrew to Missionary Ridge Sunday night, and on Monday night continued his retreat to Chattanooga and the Tennessee river. Yesterday the Confederates followed up and took position in front of the town, where they still remain. The Federals are crouching on the river bank behind entrenchments, and are busily engaged in erecting additional defences. They have a good position in a bend of the river strongly fortified in front, and their flanks well protected. It is hoped Gen. Bragg will find some way to manœuvre
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
, to wit: that the Confederate troops never fought better; nor did any other troops upon any other battle-field ever conduct themselves with higher courage or more distinguished gallantry. Longstreet's veterans and Bragg's braves entered into a generous rivalry, and each strove to set an example of daring and to out do the other. The one rushed to the conflict with their old battle flags, bearing upon their ample folds the inscriptions of the first and second "Manassas," "Seven Pines," "Malvern Hill," "Fredericksburg," and "Chancellorsville," and fully resolved to wave those glorious standards in triumph over a Western, as they had already done over an Eastern, foe. The other, conscious of their own manhood, and yielding to none in high resolve and dauntless courage, yet stung by the memory of former disasters, went upon the field with their minds and hearts fully made up never to quit it but as victors, nor until they had proven to all the world that they were the worthy brothers of
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
, Tenn., September 23d, 1863. The most important battle of the war, after that of the first Manassas, has just been fought and won by the Confederate arms.--The result is told in a few words: There is no longer an armed enemy on the soil of Georgia! Only the Federal dead, wounded, and prisoners, now remain. The multitudinous host, swelling with confidence and pride, who lately invaded that powerful State, threatening to overrun her territory and devastate her homes, has been defeated anddivision, and Kershaw's and Humphrey's brigades, of McLaw's. But let us proceed with the battle. It is already known that General Bragg deemed it prudent to withdraw his forces from Chattanooga and East Tennessee, and to retire into the State of Georgia, and there await reinforcements. The enemy's cavalry penetrated as far as Ringgold and Tunnel Hill, on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, our own cavalry, unfortunately, setting fire to the bridges as they retreated. Several affairs betwee
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
ty nobly, as did all then officers and men, and the rewards of a grateful country await them. Only portions of two of Longstreet's divisions arrived in time to take part in the fight, but they were a host within themselves. They were Benning's, Law's, and Robertson's brigades, of Hood's division, and Kershaw's and Humphrey's brigades, of McLaw's. But let us proceed with the battle. It is already known that General Bragg deemed it prudent to withdraw his forces from Chattanooga and East Tennessee, and to retire into the State of Georgia, and there await reinforcements. The enemy's cavalry penetrated as far as Ringgold and Tunnel Hill, on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, our own cavalry, unfortunately, setting fire to the bridges as they retreated. Several affairs between outposts followed on Thursday and Friday, the 17th and 18th inst., and on the 19th a heavy skirmish ensued, amounting almost, if not quite, to a general battle, in which Hood and his veterans displayed great
led is small compared with the number of wounded, which is unusually large, and the wounds are unusually slight. Many of the wounded of the enemy fell into our hands, and all of his dead, together with about forty pieces of artillery, several thousand small arms, between six and eight thousand prisoners, (some of whom were wounded,) and between twenty-five and thirty stands of colors. Among our own casualties were several general and field officers, including Brig.-Gens. Preston Smith and Deishler killed, Maj.-Gen. Hood badly wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Dan. Adams severely wounded and in the hands of the enemy. Brig.-Gen. Benning received a slight wound, though he still remains in the saddle. Monday was devoted to the care of the wounded, the burial of the dead, and the gathering up of the arms and other trophies of the battle. The enemy withdrew to Missionary Ridge Sunday night, and on Monday night continued his retreat to Chattanooga and the Tennessee river. Yesterday the Confe
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