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Easton, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 15
Letter from a Yankee prisoner in Fort Sumter. --The Easton (Pa.) Express publishes the following letter from Assistant Engineer Harmony, of Easton, who was one of the naval expedition that undertook to steam Fort Sumter and was made a prisoner. He writes as follows to his parents: Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 1863. My Dear Parents: You may be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We
ell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from Lieut. Reine's division were all that landed. The others, about 18, commenced firing their revolvers and skedaddled. We, who landed, quickly formed under Captain Williams, (I as Lieutenant,) and tried. "to rush up the rocks," but it was no go. We tried to do what we volunteered to do but could not, so we got in one of the many indentures made in the walls by Gen. Gillmore, and came to the conclusion it would be best for us to surrender, which we did. Our men behaved nobly, and we are now prisoners of war. Some of our party received letters from those who were among the skedaddler, wishing they were with us. At all events, we all done what we volunteered to do, which was to get inside of Fort Sumter (although prisoners.) The officers in command here are perfect gentlemen, and treat us as brave men, which we showed we were in our three successive attempts u
itted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Li When within fifty yards of the fort we were hailed and fired upon by the sentinel. We gave a yell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from Lieut. Reine's division were all that landed. The others, about 18, commenced firing their revolvers and skedaddled. We, who landed, quickly formed under Captain Williams, (I as Lieutenant,) and tried. "to rush up the rocks," but it was no go. We tried to do what we volunteered to do but could not, so we got in one of the many indentures made in the walls by Gen. Gillmore, and came to the conclusion it would be best for us to surre
Letter from a Yankee prisoner in Fort Sumter. --The Easton (Pa.) Express publishes the following letter from Assistant Engineer Harmony, of Easton, who was one of the naval expedition that undertook to steam Fort Sumter and was made a prisoner. He writes as follows to his parents: Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 1863. My Dear Parents: You may be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We
M. M. Butler (search for this): article 15
be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We were towed within a hundred yards of the fort and cast adrift. We then formed line and proceeded towards Sumter. When within fifty yards of the fort we were hailed and fired upon by the sentinel. We gave a yell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from Lieut. Reine's division were all that lande
pt. 9, 1863. My Dear Parents: You may be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We were towed within a hundred yards of the fort and cast adrift. We then formed line and proceeded towards Sumter. When within fifty yards of the fort we were hailed and fired upon by the sentinel. We gave a yell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from
Letter from a Yankee prisoner in Fort Sumter. --The Easton (Pa.) Express publishes the following letter from Assistant Engineer Harmony, of Easton, who was one of the naval expedition that undertook to steam Fort Sumter and was made a prisoner. He writes as follows to his parents: Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 1863. My Dear Parents: You may be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We
the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We were towed within a hundred yards of the fort and cast adrift. We then formed line and proceeded towards Sumter. When within fifty yards of the fort we were hailed and fired upon by the sentinel. We gave a yell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from Lieut. Reine's division were all that landed. The others, about 18, commenced firing their revolvers and skedaddled. We, who landed, quickly formed under Captain Williams, (I as Lieutenant,) and tried. "to rush up the rocks," but it was no go. We tried to do what we volunteered to do but could not, so we got in one of the many indentures made in the walls by Gen. Gillmore, and came to the conclu
, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We were towed within a hundred yards of the fort and cast adrift. We then formed line and proceeded towards Sumter. When within fifty yards of the fort we were hailed and fired upon by the sentinel. We gave a yell and pitched in good style, but it was no go. All of Captain Williams's, one of Lieut. Preston's (our boat,) and one from Lieut. Reine's division were all that landed. The others, about 18, commenced firing their revolvers and skedaddled. We, who landed, quickly formed under Captain Williams, (I as Lieutenant,) and tried. "to rush up the rocks," but it was no go. We tried to do what we volunteered to do but could not, so we got in one of the many indentures made in the walls by Gen. Gillmore, and came to the conclusion it would be best for us to surrender, which we did. Our men behaved nobly, and we are now prisoners o
September 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 15
Letter from a Yankee prisoner in Fort Sumter. --The Easton (Pa.) Express publishes the following letter from Assistant Engineer Harmony, of Easton, who was one of the naval expedition that undertook to steam Fort Sumter and was made a prisoner. He writes as follows to his parents: Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 1863. My Dear Parents: You may be surprised to receive a letter from me dated from this place of "brick and mortar," but so it is. An expedition was fitted out so assault and carry the fort. We reckoned without our host; for in place of we taking, we were taken. The way it was is this: At about 4.30 P. M. Capt. Williams collected the different boats comprising the expedition. Among the number were two boats from the Housatonic. I volunteered to go in the one commanded by Lieut. Brower, (the other was in command of M. M. Butler.) We found that our party was in the third division, and commanded by the Flag Lieutenant S. W., Preston. We