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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Albert Wood (search for this): article 4
Excitement in Lynchburg. --On Thursday last Wm. J. Burton, company J. Virginia regiment. Corse's brigade, was killed at a hospital in Lynchburg by a free negro named Albert Wood, who struck him with a shovel. The next day a large number of the brigade took the negroes jail and were proceeding to him, when Gen. Corse appeared among them and by his , seizing a musket and threatening to shoot the first man who dared to disobey his orders, the negro was handed over to the civil authorities, the General explaining to the soldiers at the same time the disgrace, their contemplated act, it carried out, would bring upon the brigade. Under charge of the City Council the negro was then returned to jail, and a strong guard placed in attendance to prevent any further attempt at mob law.
with all his trains for fear of being cut off by our cavalry, which is said to be already in his rear. To attempt to carry Chattanooga by storm at this time would only be attended with great cost of life, and therefore we will no doubt resort to strategy for its accomplishment. Last night the enemy pressed down on our pickets, when a heavy skirmish ensued, but which lasted but a few moments, the enemy being driven back and badly punished. Col. J. P. Jones, Inspector General, and Capt. Wm.Reid, of Gen. Bragg's staff, proceeded to the enemy's lines this morning with a flag of truce to arrange the exchange of wounded prisoners, at the instance of Rosecrans. The flag was met by Col. Jos. C. McKibben, Capt. D. G. Swain, Lieut. M. J. Kelly, and Surgeon Perrin, Medical Inspector, all of Rosecrans's staff. The preliminary arrangements were made conditionally on our part. The Yankee officers were full of chat and anxious to converse but our officers were very reserved. McKib
Yankee Prisoners are becoming as thick here as blackberries in harvest. There are now between six and eight thousand in the city, and Gen. Winder is expecting as many more this week. When they will be exchanged no one can now tell.
John Whiteford (search for this): article 2
ce would be attained by the strong arms of the soldiers in the field, in despite of the Shylocks and traitorous cormorants who had their substitutes and stayed at home to make what could be made out of the war.--The Mayor's speech was received with great satisfaction by the meeting, and when he left the stand it was amid loud and continued applause. Mr. Adolphus Gary offered the following resolution. "Resolved, That a committee of seven be appointed to act as a standing committee, whose duty it shall be to further the objects of this meeting by such action as they may think proper for the good of the cause, and that said committee shall be empowered to call future meetings, if in their opinion it be necessary." The following gentlemen were announced by the Chair as the committee called for in the above resolution: Messrs. Adolphus Gary, Samuel Huffman, John P. Tyler, Wm. D. Pemberton, Thomas J. LaPrade, James Sherry, and John Whiteford. The meeting then adjourned.
e next time. They admit that in the attack by Longstreet's and Hill's corps on Rosecrans's centre, composed of their heaviest crack corps — Crittenden's and Thomas's — these two corps lost fully one half of their men. On Friday night last, Wheeler's and Forrest's cavalry left under orders, crossing the river, provided with ten days rations. Our informant says that among the pieces of ordnance captured we have several line Napoleon and 20 pounder Parrott guns. He says we can easily sagons, containing 14 barrels of flour each, and 164 ordnance wagons, filled with ammunition, and took a number of prisoners, who were made to drive the wagons into our lines. Another officer told us that he saw 40 wagons, which were captured by Wheeler on Tuesday last, containing quartermasters' stores in great variety, and among them quartermasters' papers and a large lot of horse shoes. A letter from Dalton, Ga., to the Atlanta Intelligencer, dated the 28th, says: In the first pla
Brigadier-Generals. --The last list of Brigadier-General ships contained some gallant names. Two from Virginia — Reynolds and Wharton — richly merited the honor conferred upon them. They have been in the field sine the war began and have borne some of its severest trials, as well as sustained conspicuous parts in some of its hardest fought battles. Gen. R. while colonel has for the last two years commanded brigades in the Western army, and has a son, Lieut. Colonel Reynolds, who distinguished himself in command of a regiment at Chattanooga. All the promotions in this list we doubt not were won by gallant services in the fiel
George Washington (search for this): article 2
Notice. --Was brought to my lad, Sept. 7th, 1863, a negro man named George Washington; says he belongs to Joseph Bryant, of Bosher Parish, Louisiana, and was hired in the army to cook for Burrel McKinney, of the 9th Louisiana regiment, and was captured by the Yankees with our wagon trains in Pennsylvania, and made his escape near Fredericksburg and swam the river, and says that Col. Hodge, of the 9th Louisiana regiment, is acquainted with him. Said negro is of a black complexion and about 23 years old, is 5 feet 10 inches high, and smartly knock kneed. The owner will come forward, pay expenses, and take him away. Robt. Lumpkin. oc 5--1aw5t
which had been prepared and adopted by that committee, as well as the bill reported by the Legislative committee to put town extortion and protect the men of salaries from the heartless attempts of those traitorous traders who are every day trying to grind them to the very dust. After the adoption of the report of the committee, Mr. Robinson offered the following resolutions, which were adopted. "1. Resolved, That it is with pleasure we have seen a disposition on the part of Messrs. Warwick & Barksdale to relieve the wants of this community by agreeing to sell their flour at the Government price, thus evincing a feeling in consonance with the wishes of the country, engaged as it is for its independence. "2. Resolved, That we duly appreciate the motives of the butchers in their desire to reduce the price of beef, if they are sincere in their professions; but we desire to see everything regulated by law, and not dependent upon the caprice of any class who are dealers in
John P. Tyler (search for this): article 2
e would be attained by the strong arms of the soldiers in the field, in despite of the Shylocks and traitorous cormorants who had their substitutes and stayed at home to make what could be made out of the war.--The Mayor's speech was received with great satisfaction by the meeting, and when he left the stand it was amid loud and continued applause. Mr. Adolphus Gary offered the following resolution. "Resolved, That a committee of seven be appointed to act as a standing committee, whose duty it shall be to further the objects of this meeting by such action as they may think proper for the good of the cause, and that said committee shall be empowered to call future meetings, if in their opinion it be necessary." The following gentlemen were announced by the Chair as the committee called for in the above resolution: Messrs. Adolphus Gary, Samuel Huffman, John P. Tyler, Wm. D. Pemberton, Thomas J. LaPrade, James Sherry, and John Whiteford. The meeting then adjourned.
John Tyler (search for this): article 2
usiness of the meeting." Mr. Samuel Huffman then offered the following, which was adopted unanimously. "Resolved, That the thanks of this meeting are due, and are hereby tendered, to the special committee of the House of Delegates for their exertions in carrying out our wishes." It was here suggested that a committee of three should be appointed to wait on Mayor Mayo, and request him to come forward and address them, which committee consisted of the following gentlemen: Messrs. John Tyler, Robert Scofield, and Henry Dyke. In a short time the committee entered the hall accompanied by His Honor, who delivered an address of about a half hour's length, in which he expressed his heartfelt sympathy with the objects of the meeting, and promised all the aid in his power to further their plans. Although he was not in one sense of the word a mechanic, yet he was a laboring man, and had been such from his infancy; he always had earned his bread by the "sweat of his brow." Th
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