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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 414 total hits in 223 results.

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September 14th (search for this): article 1
Runaway--$100 reward. --Ran away, on Monday, 14th September, from the Florida Hospital No. 11, in Richmond, Billy Johnson, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Forlame, Chesterfield, Va. Said man is about 24 years old, light gingerbread color, thick lip, pop eyes, bushy head of hair (curly), stout made, about 5 feet 9 inches high, hangs his head down when walking; wears his hat or cap one side, his weight is about 165 or 170 pounds can cut hair and shave, and might pass off for a free man very readily. No doubt but he has gone off with some officer or private to the army above Orange C. H., or to the South--possibly making his way to the North. He had no papers about his person; or, if any they were forged. I will give the above reward for his delivery to any jail so I can get him again. D. A. Brown. oc 5--1t*
Billy Johnson (search for this): article 1
Runaway--$100 reward. --Ran away, on Monday, 14th September, from the Florida Hospital No. 11, in Richmond, Billy Johnson, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Forlame, Chesterfield, Va. Said man is about 24 years old, light gingerbread color, thick lip, pop eyes, bushy head of hair (curly), stout made, about 5 feet 9 inches high, hangs his head down when walking; wears his hat or cap one side, his weight is about 165 or 170 pounds can cut hair and shave, and might pass off for a free man very readily. No doubt but he has gone off with some officer or private to the army above Orange C. H., or to the South--possibly making his way to the North. He had no papers about his person; or, if any they were forged. I will give the above reward for his delivery to any jail so I can get him again. D. A. Brown. oc 5--1t*
D. A. Brown (search for this): article 1
Runaway--$100 reward. --Ran away, on Monday, 14th September, from the Florida Hospital No. 11, in Richmond, Billy Johnson, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Forlame, Chesterfield, Va. Said man is about 24 years old, light gingerbread color, thick lip, pop eyes, bushy head of hair (curly), stout made, about 5 feet 9 inches high, hangs his head down when walking; wears his hat or cap one side, his weight is about 165 or 170 pounds can cut hair and shave, and might pass off for a free man very readily. No doubt but he has gone off with some officer or private to the army above Orange C. H., or to the South--possibly making his way to the North. He had no papers about his person; or, if any they were forged. I will give the above reward for his delivery to any jail so I can get him again. D. A. Brown. oc 5--1t*
Sarah A. Forlame (search for this): article 1
Runaway--$100 reward. --Ran away, on Monday, 14th September, from the Florida Hospital No. 11, in Richmond, Billy Johnson, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Forlame, Chesterfield, Va. Said man is about 24 years old, light gingerbread color, thick lip, pop eyes, bushy head of hair (curly), stout made, about 5 feet 9 inches high, hangs his head down when walking; wears his hat or cap one side, his weight is about 165 or 170 pounds can cut hair and shave, and might pass off for a free man very readily. No doubt but he has gone off with some officer or private to the army above Orange C. H., or to the South--possibly making his way to the North. He had no papers about his person; or, if any they were forged. I will give the above reward for his delivery to any jail so I can get him again. D. A. Brown. oc 5--1t*
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Runaway--$100 reward. --Ran away, on Monday, 14th September, from the Florida Hospital No. 11, in Richmond, Billy Johnson, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Forlame, Chesterfield, Va. Said man is about 24 years old, light gingerbread color, thick lip, pop eyes, bushy head of hair (curly), stout made, about 5 feet 9 inches high, hangs his head down when walking; wears his hat or cap one side, his weight is about 165 or 170 pounds can cut hair and shave, and might pass off for a free man very readily. No doubt but he has gone off with some officer or private to the army above Orange C. H., or to the South--possibly making his way to the North. He had no papers about his person; or, if any they were forged. I will give the above reward for his delivery to any jail so I can get him again. D. A. Brown. oc 5--1t*
Rosecrans (search for this): article 1
under the belief that only three Federal corps had advanced up the valley of the Chickamauga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction ay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements to his antagonist than any he could count upon. Moreover, Rosecrans was not on his guard, and did not look for an attack from an enemy who he supposed would be only too glad to effect hise worse than madness. Many of these works have been prepared or otherwise strengthened since the battle. But does Rosecrans intend to hold Chattanooga? A reconnaissance was undertaken last night at half-past 10 o'clock, when his pickets and se escaped out of their lines report that the whole army is moving toward Murfreesboro'. It may be a part of the plan of Rosecrans to leave a sufficient force behind to hold Chattanooga while he moves the main body of the army to some other point.
said — but with what truth I can not determine — that he acted under the belief that only three Federal corps had advanced up the valley of the Chickamauga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction with the main body. It such was his belief he was deceived, except as to Burnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements to his antagonist than any he could count upon. Moreover, Rosecrans was not on his guard, and did not look for an attack from an enemy who he supposed would be only too glad to effect his escape. At one time he was wary and active, combining the cunning of the fox with the sudden energy of the panthe
George H. Thomas (search for this): article 1
nd our entire army passed over. This plan was frustrated, according to report, by a counter movement which is explained in the following order of the Federal General Thomas. This order was found upon the person of Adj't Gen. Mubleman, of Gen. Palmer's staff, who subsequently fell into our hands. Headq'rs 14th Army Corps,Nxander Mill. If you advance as soon as possible on them in front, while I attack them in flank, I think we can use them up. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-Gen'l Jr. Commanding. This was Saturday morning. The counter attack upon the front and flank of our flanking column was made with vigor soon after it had crossed the river, and in accordance with the plan suggested by Gen. Thomas, and if not entirely successful, it was sufficiently so to disarrange our plans and delay our movements. The inquiry may arise in the mind of the reader why Gen. Bragg did not postpone the attack until all his reinforcements could get up?
I can not determine — that he acted under the belief that only three Federal corps had advanced up the valley of the Chickamauga, and that the remainder of Rosecrans's army was still on the north side of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, and that Burnside had not yet formed a junction with the main body. It such was his belief he was deceived, except as to Burnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrBurnside, as Gen. Lee was at Gettysburg when he supposed, on the morning of the 2d of July, that the whole of Meade's forces had not then arrived. And yet it must be admitted that Gen. Bragg acted wisely in giving battle when and where he did. Delay was full of danger; it might bring heavier reinforcements to his antagonist than any he could count upon. Moreover, Rosecrans was not on his guard, and did not look for an attack from an enemy who he supposed would be only too glad to effect his escape. At one time he was wary and active, combining the cunning of the fox with the sudden energy of the panther springing upon its prey; bu
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
is, let us see what were he fruits of our victory. In the first place, we captured 7,000 well prisoners; these will go far towards equalizing our losses at Vicksburg and Port Hudson. In the next, we took 40 stands of colors, 38 guns (of which Longstreet's command brought off 27,) 25,000 small arms, 150 wagons, and several thousand cartridge boxes, and knapsacks with their contents. This is a good showing--one that speaks for itself — and will pass for a great victory in any country. But this of an imperiled people. But the truth of history, as well as simple justice, requires it to be stated here, that no one officer, or body of men of the same number, could have contributed more to the triumph of the Confederate arms than did Gen. Longstreet and the brave veterans who followed him from Virginia. They had travelled from the Rappahannock, in crowded cars, upon open platforms and upon the tops of the cars, in the rain, in the dust and in the sun, and with but little food or sleep.
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