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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
) says: On Sunday last the desire for blood manifested itself in the southeastern part of Jackson county, not far from the village of Lone Jack. Although it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almoiam Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordere
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
The Sufferings of the border Missourians. --The people of Missouri, on the Kansas border, are being slaughtered without mercy under the authority of the Yankee commander of that department — Schofield. A letter to the St. Louis Republican, (Yankee,) says: On Sunday last the desire for blood manifested itself in the southeastern part of Jackson county, not far from the village of Lone Jack. Although it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; Wi
Lone Jack (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
The Sufferings of the border Missourians. --The people of Missouri, on the Kansas border, are being slaughtered without mercy under the authority of the Yankee commander of that department — Schofield. A letter to the St. Louis Republican, (Yankee,) says: On Sunday last the desire for blood manifested itself in the southeastern part of Jackson county, not far from the village of Lone Jack. Although it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; W
mmenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordered to leave, which they did, of course. They had not gone much over three-fourths of a mile before they heard firing at the point at which they had left the soldiers with the remaining prisoners. In a short time the command moved on, and the wives and other relatives of the prisoners rushed up to ascertain their fate. It was a horrid spectacle. There lay six lifeless
William Hunter (search for this): article 3
alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordered t
r's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordered to leave, which they did, of course. They had not gone much over three-fourths of a mile before they heard firing at the point at which they had left the soldiers with the remaining prisoners. In a short time the command moved on, and the wives and other relatives of the prisoners rushed up to ascertain their fate. It was a horrid spectacle. Th
John S. Cave (search for this): article 3
e people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were
Andrew Owsley (search for this): article 3
headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying, Mr. Rice and his son were released, and ordered to leave, which they did, of course. They had not gone much over three-fo
Benjamin Potter (search for this): article 3
though it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; William C. Tate, aged 30; Andrew Owsley, aged 17, and Martin Rice and his son. While thus engaged in loading their wagons with such effects as they supposed would be most useful to them, a detachment of Kansas troops, (said to be part of the Kansas 9th, though this may be a mistake,) under command of Lieut.-Colonel Clark and Capt. Coleman, came up and took them all prisoners. After a little parleying,
Schofield (search for this): article 3
The Sufferings of the border Missourians. --The people of Missouri, on the Kansas border, are being slaughtered without mercy under the authority of the Yankee commander of that department — Schofield. A letter to the St. Louis Republican, (Yankee,) says: On Sunday last the desire for blood manifested itself in the southeastern part of Jackson county, not far from the village of Lone Jack. Although it was Sunday, the people of that region, alarmed and terror stricken by threats from Kansas, and cruel edicts from headquarters of the district, were hard at work straining every nerve to get ready to leave their homes before this memorable 9th day of September, 1863. One party of these unfortunate victims of a cruel order had almost completed their preparations, and within half an hour's time would have commenced their weary wanderings in search of a home. It consisted of Benjamin Potter, aged 75; John S. Cave, aged 50; William Hunter, aged 47; David Hunter, aged 35; W
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