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Sweetwater (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
we are glad to see that the Yanks are trying to "get out of the way" of Gen. Williams. The Atlanta Register says: A gentleman recently from East Tennessee informs us that previous to the battle of Chickamauga the Yankees had so far, by lies and misrepresentations, induced the people to believe that Bragg's army was destroyed and the rebellion crushed, that great numbers of credulous Confederates expressed their willingness to submit to the yoke of the Northern despotism. At Sweetwater, Tenn., a meeting of citizens was called to discuss the propriety of hoisting the Union flag over that place, and only one man, Dr. Bogart, raised his voice to denounce the disgraceful proposition. Several ladies of the town, with that unquenchable patriotism which is so characteristic of Southern women, declared that they would, with their own hands, tear down the Union flag as often as the cravens should put it up, let the consequences be what they might. Among these were Mrs. Bogart and
Mecklenburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
g these were Mrs. Bogart and Mrs. H. F. Smith. By another arrival from East Tennessee we learn that Brig.-Gen. Vaughan is now at that place with a large force of cavalry and infantry. It is presumable that the weak-kneed gentlemen who were shamed out of their submissionist design by the heroism of a few courageous women, will, for a time at least, hide their diminished heads. It has some additional information from Knoxville: Before burning the residence of Dr. Ramsay, at Mecklenburg, his furniture was taken out and distributed among the Unionists in the neighborhood. Mabry had not been sent to Camp Chase, as reported, but was on good term with Burnside. Messrs. William and Mike Branner, of the Ocooc Bank, having refused to take the oath, were obliged to report every day at headquarters. Col. Luttrel, Mayor of Knoxville, was appointed Federal postmaster. Baxter had made half a dozen Union speeches. Rev. Mr. Harrison's church, (1st Presbyterian,) was closed, b
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
From East Tennessee. --The Bristol Advocate has the following paragraph about affairs in East Tennessee: We are informed that the Yankees induced a large number of recruits to join them inEast Tennessee: We are informed that the Yankees induced a large number of recruits to join them in Upper East Tennessee. The number is estimated at from 3,000 to 4,000. We understand that the Rev. Hon. N. G. Taylor, with his two sons, has gone with the enemy, and that Grisham, of the Jonesboro' East Tennessee. The number is estimated at from 3,000 to 4,000. We understand that the Rev. Hon. N. G. Taylor, with his two sons, has gone with the enemy, and that Grisham, of the Jonesboro' Express, also went as a Captain of a company of recruits — number, 104 --for the Yankee army. Hon. T. A. R. Nelson left with the Yankees also, and at last report was in Knoxville. Gen. Carter af the way" of Gen. Williams. The Atlanta Register says: A gentleman recently from East Tennessee informs us that previous to the battle of Chickamauga the Yankees had so far, by lies and mithey might. Among these were Mrs. Bogart and Mrs. H. F. Smith. By another arrival from East Tennessee we learn that Brig.-Gen. Vaughan is now at that place with a large force of cavalry and infa
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 6
A. R. Nelson left with the Yankees also, and at last report was in Knoxville. Gen. Carter and others moved their families and effects, as they fell back before our troops, indicating some uncertainty, in their estimation, as to the final fate of that section. The number of horses and the amount of other stock taken off by the enemy is said to be immense. This we can but deeply regret, yet we are glad to see that the Yanks are trying to "get out of the way" of Gen. Williams. The Atlanta Register says: A gentleman recently from East Tennessee informs us that previous to the battle of Chickamauga the Yankees had so far, by lies and misrepresentations, induced the people to believe that Bragg's army was destroyed and the rebellion crushed, that great numbers of credulous Confederates expressed their willingness to submit to the yoke of the Northern despotism. At Sweetwater, Tenn., a meeting of citizens was called to discuss the propriety of hoisting the Union flag over
N. G. Taylor (search for this): article 6
From East Tennessee. --The Bristol Advocate has the following paragraph about affairs in East Tennessee: We are informed that the Yankees induced a large number of recruits to join them in Upper East Tennessee. The number is estimated at from 3,000 to 4,000. We understand that the Rev. Hon. N. G. Taylor, with his two sons, has gone with the enemy, and that Grisham, of the Jonesboro' Express, also went as a Captain of a company of recruits — number, 104 --for the Yankee army. Hon. T. A. R. Nelson left with the Yankees also, and at last report was in Knoxville. Gen. Carter and others moved their families and effects, as they fell back before our troops, indicating some uncertainty, in their estimation, as to the final fate of that section. The number of horses and the amount of other stock taken off by the enemy is said to be immense. This we can but deeply regret, yet we are glad to see that the Yanks are trying to "get out of the way" of Gen. Williams. The
From East Tennessee. --The Bristol Advocate has the following paragraph about affairs in East Tennessee: We are informed that the Yankees induced a large number of recruits to join them in Upper East Tennessee. The number is estimated at from 3,000 to 4,000. We understand that the Rev. Hon. N. G. Taylor, with his two sons, has gone with the enemy, and that Grisham, of the Jonesboro' Express, also went as a Captain of a company of recruits — number, 104 --for the Yankee army. Hon. T. A. R. Nelson left with the Yankees also, and at last report was in Knoxville. Gen. Carter and others moved their families and effects, as they fell back before our troops, indicating some uncertainty, in their estimation, as to the final fate of that section. The number of horses and the amount of other stock taken off by the enemy is said to be immense. This we can but deeply regret, yet we are glad to see that the Yanks are trying to "get out of the way" of Gen. Williams. The
H. F. Smith (search for this): article 6
., a meeting of citizens was called to discuss the propriety of hoisting the Union flag over that place, and only one man, Dr. Bogart, raised his voice to denounce the disgraceful proposition. Several ladies of the town, with that unquenchable patriotism which is so characteristic of Southern women, declared that they would, with their own hands, tear down the Union flag as often as the cravens should put it up, let the consequences be what they might. Among these were Mrs. Bogart and Mrs. H. F. Smith. By another arrival from East Tennessee we learn that Brig.-Gen. Vaughan is now at that place with a large force of cavalry and infantry. It is presumable that the weak-kneed gentlemen who were shamed out of their submissionist design by the heroism of a few courageous women, will, for a time at least, hide their diminished heads. It has some additional information from Knoxville: Before burning the residence of Dr. Ramsay, at Mecklenburg, his furniture was taken out an
arn that Brig.-Gen. Vaughan is now at that place with a large force of cavalry and infantry. It is presumable that the weak-kneed gentlemen who were shamed out of their submissionist design by the heroism of a few courageous women, will, for a time at least, hide their diminished heads. It has some additional information from Knoxville: Before burning the residence of Dr. Ramsay, at Mecklenburg, his furniture was taken out and distributed among the Unionists in the neighborhood. Mabry had not been sent to Camp Chase, as reported, but was on good term with Burnside. Messrs. William and Mike Branner, of the Ocooc Bank, having refused to take the oath, were obliged to report every day at headquarters. Col. Luttrel, Mayor of Knoxville, was appointed Federal postmaster. Baxter had made half a dozen Union speeches. Rev. Mr. Harrison's church, (1st Presbyterian,) was closed, but services were allowed at Mr. Martin's, (2d Presbyterian.) Families of secession refugees had
T. A. R. Nelson (search for this): article 6
m East Tennessee. --The Bristol Advocate has the following paragraph about affairs in East Tennessee: We are informed that the Yankees induced a large number of recruits to join them in Upper East Tennessee. The number is estimated at from 3,000 to 4,000. We understand that the Rev. Hon. N. G. Taylor, with his two sons, has gone with the enemy, and that Grisham, of the Jonesboro' Express, also went as a Captain of a company of recruits — number, 104 --for the Yankee army. Hon. T. A. R. Nelson left with the Yankees also, and at last report was in Knoxville. Gen. Carter and others moved their families and effects, as they fell back before our troops, indicating some uncertainty, in their estimation, as to the final fate of that section. The number of horses and the amount of other stock taken off by the enemy is said to be immense. This we can but deeply regret, yet we are glad to see that the Yanks are trying to "get out of the way" of Gen. Williams. The Atlant
It is presumable that the weak-kneed gentlemen who were shamed out of their submissionist design by the heroism of a few courageous women, will, for a time at least, hide their diminished heads. It has some additional information from Knoxville: Before burning the residence of Dr. Ramsay, at Mecklenburg, his furniture was taken out and distributed among the Unionists in the neighborhood. Mabry had not been sent to Camp Chase, as reported, but was on good term with Burnside. Messrs. William and Mike Branner, of the Ocooc Bank, having refused to take the oath, were obliged to report every day at headquarters. Col. Luttrel, Mayor of Knoxville, was appointed Federal postmaster. Baxter had made half a dozen Union speeches. Rev. Mr. Harrison's church, (1st Presbyterian,) was closed, but services were allowed at Mr. Martin's, (2d Presbyterian.) Families of secession refugees had not been molested. All the citizens confined in jail had been released on taking the oath.
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