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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
us road, over which they have to haul their supplies sixty miles, with daily annoyances by our cavalry. It is said that they are now suffering for rations, and this report is confirmed by an appeal recently made by Resecraus to the people of East Tennessee calling for assistance, and telling them that if they do not supply his army he will be compelled to give up that portion of the State to the Confederates. I have great confidence in Gen. Bragg, and believe that he will soon compel Rosecreport is confirmed by an appeal recently made by Resecraus to the people of East Tennessee calling for assistance, and telling them that if they do not supply his army he will be compelled to give up that portion of the State to the Confederates. I have great confidence in Gen. Bragg, and believe that he will soon compel Rosecrans to evacuate Tennessee and Kentucky. His entire army would no doubt have been ruined in the late battle had bragg's orders been strictly and promptly obeyed.
Longstreet (search for this): article 7
From Chattanooga. --The following is an extract from a letter from a prominent officer in Gen. Longstreet's corps dated the 3d inst.: We (Longstreet's corps) are now cooperating with Bragg's army, and to-day quietly squatted around the little insignificant place Chattanooga, watching the enemy. They are strongly fortified like ourselves, each thinking it an unhealthy task to attempt to drive the other out of their entrenchments. We have heavy batteries of artillery posted on the hLongstreet's corps) are now cooperating with Bragg's army, and to-day quietly squatted around the little insignificant place Chattanooga, watching the enemy. They are strongly fortified like ourselves, each thinking it an unhealthy task to attempt to drive the other out of their entrenchments. We have heavy batteries of artillery posted on the heights, which command the town. There is little probability, however, of any such madness as an advance on their part.--It is not believed that either party will attack here. Their position, although not impregnable, is very strongly fortified, and would cost half the army to storm them. The probability is that in a few days they will be compelled to evacuate for want of provisions, as all communication is cut off with the exception of a small mountainous road, over which they have to haul th
From Chattanooga. --The following is an extract from a letter from a prominent officer in Gen. Longstreet's corps dated the 3d inst.: We (Longstreet's corps) are now cooperating with Bragg's army, and to-day quietly squatted around the little insignificant place Chattanooga, watching the enemy. They are strongly fortified like ourselves, each thinking it an unhealthy task to attempt to drive the other out of their entrenchments. We have heavy batteries of artillery posted on the h report is confirmed by an appeal recently made by Resecraus to the people of East Tennessee calling for assistance, and telling them that if they do not supply his army he will be compelled to give up that portion of the State to the Confederates. I have great confidence in Gen. Bragg, and believe that he will soon compel Rosecrans to evacuate Tennessee and Kentucky. His entire army would no doubt have been ruined in the late battle had bragg's orders been strictly and promptly obeyed.
Rosecrans (search for this): article 7
not believed that either party will attack here. Their position, although not impregnable, is very strongly fortified, and would cost half the army to storm them. The probability is that in a few days they will be compelled to evacuate for want of provisions, as all communication is cut off with the exception of a small mountainous road, over which they have to haul their supplies sixty miles, with daily annoyances by our cavalry. It is said that they are now suffering for rations, and this report is confirmed by an appeal recently made by Resecraus to the people of East Tennessee calling for assistance, and telling them that if they do not supply his army he will be compelled to give up that portion of the State to the Confederates. I have great confidence in Gen. Bragg, and believe that he will soon compel Rosecrans to evacuate Tennessee and Kentucky. His entire army would no doubt have been ruined in the late battle had bragg's orders been strictly and promptly obeyed.
From Chattanooga. --The following is an extract from a letter from a prominent officer in Gen. Longstreet's corps dated the 3d inst.: We (Longstreet's corps) are now cooperating with Bragg's army, and to-day quietly squatted around the little insignificant place Chattanooga, watching the enemy. They are strongly fortified like ourselves, each thinking it an unhealthy task to attempt to drive the other out of their entrenchments. We have heavy batteries of artillery posted on the heights, which command the town. There is little probability, however, of any such madness as an advance on their part.--It is not believed that either party will attack here. Their position, although not impregnable, is very strongly fortified, and would cost half the army to storm them. The probability is that in a few days they will be compelled to evacuate for want of provisions, as all communication is cut off with the exception of a small mountainous road, over which they have to haul the