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Demopolis (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 6
Movements of President Davis --Reception and Speech.--A correspondent of the Salem Reporter writes from Demopolis, Ala., Saturday, October 12, as follows: To day has been a grand occasion in Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistr
ast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Missouri (Bowen's regiment,) he halted and made a few stirring remarks as follows: "Gallant Missouria
rn train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Missouri (Bowen's regiment,) he halted and made a few stirring rema
Joe Davis (search for this): article 6
Movements of President Davis --Reception and Speech.--A correspondent of the Salem Reporter writes from Demopolis, Ala., Saturday, October 12, as follows: To day has been a grand occasion in Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistr
t Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendiHardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Missouri (Bowen's regim
e welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Missouri (Bowen's regiment,) he halted and made a few stirring remarks as follows: "
a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Missouri (Bowen's regiment,) he halted and made a few stirring remarks as follows: "Gallant Missourian! I look with sadness upon you reduced ranks, and feel it a high honor to be in the presence of such chivalrous soldiers. I have heard of your heroism upon the bloody fields of the West, and must express to you the high regard which I cherish for your privations and positive sufferings in the cause of liberty. I thank you from the deepest seat of my heart — from its every fibre, for your dauntless courag
F. S. Lyon (search for this): article 6
Movements of President Davis --Reception and Speech.--A correspondent of the Salem Reporter writes from Demopolis, Ala., Saturday, October 12, as follows: To day has been a grand occasion in Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrat
Peyton Johnston (search for this): article 6
Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accoGeneral Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrate. Each regiment, as the President reached its colors presented arms and drooped its ensign, and greeted the President with rapturous cheers. When the President came opposite the flag of the First Mis
Movements of President Davis --Reception and Speech.--A correspondent of the Salem Reporter writes from Demopolis, Ala., Saturday, October 12, as follows: To day has been a grand occasion in Demopolis. President Davis and staff arrived here by the Eastern train, and were welcomed by a vast concourse of citizens and soldiers — the sweet strains of a military band, and a salute of thirteen guns by Moor's battery. The President, General Johnston, Lieut.-General Hardee and Hen. F. S. Lyon, rode to the residence of the latter in a handsome phæton followed by a number of open carriages containing the President's, General Johnston's and Hardee's staff. At 3 o'clock, the President, accompanied by a splendid cortege, reviewed the brigades of General Cockrell, General Pettus and Gen. Moore. The line was formed on the end of the main streets of the town, and was nearly a mile long. The troops made a creditable appearance, and Ellette the highest encomiums from the Chief Magistrat
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