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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 30, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 385 total hits in 183 results.

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George R. Howard (search for this): article 3
Relieving a tailor shop. --Yesterday morning the Mayor had before him a number of negroes, charged with stealing and receiving several hundred dollars worth of cloths and clothing, the property of Mr. Geo. R. Howard, a merchant tailor. These goods were taken at different times within the past twelve months, and the amount carried off cannot possibly be clearly ascertained. William, slave to L. Hopkins, seems to have been the principal thief, he having had access to Mr. H.'s shop. The articles set down to him are nine yards of black cloth worth $400, a cloth coat worth $250, nine yards of cassimere worth $260, two yards of silk velvet worth $50, and many other items. Branch, slave to Thomas Bass, received the coat; William, slave to R. O. Hakins, received three yards of cassimere and two yards of silk velvet; and Edward, slave to E. Taylor, received nine yards of cassimere. After a careful investigation of all the facts william was sent on the Hustings Court to answer for the
Thomas Bass (search for this): article 3
g several hundred dollars worth of cloths and clothing, the property of Mr. Geo. R. Howard, a merchant tailor. These goods were taken at different times within the past twelve months, and the amount carried off cannot possibly be clearly ascertained. William, slave to L. Hopkins, seems to have been the principal thief, he having had access to Mr. H.'s shop. The articles set down to him are nine yards of black cloth worth $400, a cloth coat worth $250, nine yards of cassimere worth $260, two yards of silk velvet worth $50, and many other items. Branch, slave to Thomas Bass, received the coat; William, slave to R. O. Hakins, received three yards of cassimere and two yards of silk velvet; and Edward, slave to E. Taylor, received nine yards of cassimere. After a careful investigation of all the facts william was sent on the Hustings Court to answer for the theft, and the other parties were all sent on to answer for receiving the goods from William, knowing them to have been stolen.
L. Hopkins (search for this): article 3
Relieving a tailor shop. --Yesterday morning the Mayor had before him a number of negroes, charged with stealing and receiving several hundred dollars worth of cloths and clothing, the property of Mr. Geo. R. Howard, a merchant tailor. These goods were taken at different times within the past twelve months, and the amount carried off cannot possibly be clearly ascertained. William, slave to L. Hopkins, seems to have been the principal thief, he having had access to Mr. H.'s shop. The articles set down to him are nine yards of black cloth worth $400, a cloth coat worth $250, nine yards of cassimere worth $260, two yards of silk velvet worth $50, and many other items. Branch, slave to Thomas Bass, received the coat; William, slave to R. O. Hakins, received three yards of cassimere and two yards of silk velvet; and Edward, slave to E. Taylor, received nine yards of cassimere. After a careful investigation of all the facts william was sent on the Hustings Court to answer for the
R. O. Hakins (search for this): article 3
ng several hundred dollars worth of cloths and clothing, the property of Mr. Geo. R. Howard, a merchant tailor. These goods were taken at different times within the past twelve months, and the amount carried off cannot possibly be clearly ascertained. William, slave to L. Hopkins, seems to have been the principal thief, he having had access to Mr. H.'s shop. The articles set down to him are nine yards of black cloth worth $400, a cloth coat worth $250, nine yards of cassimere worth $260, two yards of silk velvet worth $50, and many other items. Branch, slave to Thomas Bass, received the coat; William, slave to R. O. Hakins, received three yards of cassimere and two yards of silk velvet; and Edward, slave to E. Taylor, received nine yards of cassimere. After a careful investigation of all the facts william was sent on the Hustings Court to answer for the theft, and the other parties were all sent on to answer for receiving the goods from William, knowing them to have been stolen.
From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes.
From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes.
October 29th (search for this): article 3
From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes.
Louis.Bay St. Louis (search for this): article 3
From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes. From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes.
Pascagoula (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 3
From Bay St. Louis. Pascagoula, Oct. 29. --A courier from Bay St. Louis says that one hundred Yankees, under cover of the gunboat Commodore, landed at that place on the 23d, surprised and attacked our cavalry, wounding one man slightly, and Capt. Marshall severely though the body. They recaptured four prisoners previously taken, burned four houses, plundered the place, and carried off some negroes.
Gen Lee's Pursuit of Meade. The Yankees are obviously very sore upon this subject, as may be seen by the extract from one of their papers which we published yesterday. They are chagrined at seeing their latest Napoleon fleeing like a deer before his adversary, and they invent all sorts of excuses to cover his shame.--The most amusing is that which represents Meade as in vain seeking a battle with Lee! A novel method he adopted, certainly, to bring that about; running off like a race-ho he would have been gratified to his heart's content.--Surely no nation ever approached the Yankees in the art of lying. Meade's pretended chagrin at not being able to meet Lee is in the genuine Yankee spirit. He would have given, it seems, one oruth side of James river, it seems, is the only true route, perhaps because it has not yet been tried. But, first of all, Meade is to get behind his works at Washington, and send off large reinforcements to Tennessee, to finish up things in that qua
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