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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 30, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 385 total hits in 183 results.

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John Terrett (search for this): article 4
Fatal Accident. --John Terrett, a newsboy and son of W. H. Terrett, of Jackson, Miss., was killed by falling from the cars near Demopolis on the 21st. Mr. Terrett has lost three sons since the commencement of the war--one killed in battle and two accidentally.
W. H. Terrett (search for this): article 4
Fatal Accident. --John Terrett, a newsboy and son of W. H. Terrett, of Jackson, Miss., was killed by falling from the cars near Demopolis on the 21st. Mr. Terrett has lost three sons since the commencement of the war--one killed in battle and two accidentally. Fatal Accident. --John Terrett, a newsboy and son of W. H. Terrett, of Jackson, Miss., was killed by falling from the cars near Demopolis on the 21st. Mr. Terrett has lost three sons since the commencement of the war--one killed in battle and two accidentally.
Demopolis (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 4
Fatal Accident. --John Terrett, a newsboy and son of W. H. Terrett, of Jackson, Miss., was killed by falling from the cars near Demopolis on the 21st. Mr. Terrett has lost three sons since the commencement of the war--one killed in battle and two accidentally.
October 28th (search for this): article 4
Fatal duel. Augusta, Oct. 28. --A duel took place near this city this morning, between C. A. Reed, of Augusta, and R. Copeland, of Maryland. The latter was killed.
C. A. Reed (search for this): article 4
Fatal duel. Augusta, Oct. 28. --A duel took place near this city this morning, between C. A. Reed, of Augusta, and R. Copeland, of Maryland. The latter was killed.
R. Copeland (search for this): article 4
Fatal duel. Augusta, Oct. 28. --A duel took place near this city this morning, between C. A. Reed, of Augusta, and R. Copeland, of Maryland. The latter was killed.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 4
Fatal duel. Augusta, Oct. 28. --A duel took place near this city this morning, between C. A. Reed, of Augusta, and R. Copeland, of Maryland. The latter was killed.
Rosecrans (search for this): article 4
A Legion of Honor. It is suggested in the Western army that a Legion of Honor be organized, to be composed of those privates who have most distinguished themselves in battle. Rosecrans, it appears, has already constituted a formidable body of cavalry, by compelling all incompetent cavalry soldiers to be dismounted and placed in the foot, and such infantry as had distinguished themselves to be put in their places. It is believed that the adoption of a similar practice in our Western army might have beneficial effects. At all events, a Legion of Honor, composed of the bravest of the brave, would soon become as famous as the Imperial Guard of France, and perhaps decide the fate of every important field. In this connection we regret to see some dissatisfaction expressed at the manner in which the officers and soldiers sent by Gen. Bragg with the colors captured in his great victory were received in this city. It is said that these gallant men, whose conduct in the field had
ch infantry as had distinguished themselves to be put in their places. It is believed that the adoption of a similar practice in our Western army might have beneficial effects. At all events, a Legion of Honor, composed of the bravest of the brave, would soon become as famous as the Imperial Guard of France, and perhaps decide the fate of every important field. In this connection we regret to see some dissatisfaction expressed at the manner in which the officers and soldiers sent by Gen. Bragg with the colors captured in his great victory were received in this city. It is said that these gallant men, whose conduct in the field had attracted honorable mention in the reports of their commanders, and who bore with them trophies which in any other nation would have secured them an ovation, were scarcely noticed upon their arrival here, the flags carelessly thrown into a wagon, driven off by a negro, and the representatives of the heroes of Chickamauga permitted to depart without an
France (France) (search for this): article 4
hemselves in battle. Rosecrans, it appears, has already constituted a formidable body of cavalry, by compelling all incompetent cavalry soldiers to be dismounted and placed in the foot, and such infantry as had distinguished themselves to be put in their places. It is believed that the adoption of a similar practice in our Western army might have beneficial effects. At all events, a Legion of Honor, composed of the bravest of the brave, would soon become as famous as the Imperial Guard of France, and perhaps decide the fate of every important field. In this connection we regret to see some dissatisfaction expressed at the manner in which the officers and soldiers sent by Gen. Bragg with the colors captured in his great victory were received in this city. It is said that these gallant men, whose conduct in the field had attracted honorable mention in the reports of their commanders, and who bore with them trophies which in any other nation would have secured them an ovation, we
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