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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 30, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Tennessee Valley (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): article 1
direction until to-day. Since midnight the very gates of heaven seem to be opened, and the rain is pouring down in incessant torrents. If the roads be not rendered impracticable by it, we will in all probability see the one hundred and twenty pontoons the enemy have built at Chickamauga Station put to use before long, somewhere between here and Knoxville. It would certainly be the best move they could make. It would give their army once more the benefit of the crops of the rich valley of the Tennessee. It would throw it between Rosecrans's and Burnside's, and compel the latter to beat a hasty retreat to Kentucky to escape annihilation. And lastly, it would force this army to abandon Chattanooga and hunt up the enemy for battle north of the Tennessee. A last element of uncertainty as to the duration of our occupation of Chattanooga is formed by our precarious lines of communications. We have had three bridges across the Tennessee. Two of these were rendered impracticable
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
passed over them. The present rain will probably double these. One of the roads along the river is rendered unsafe by the bushwhackers firing from the South bank. It was natural for the enemy to attempt to cut the long thread of railroads — over three hundred miles--that alone connects us with the North, by dint of cavalry raids. It is to be hoped that our cavalry will prevent the mischief contemplated by the bands of Wheeler and Forrest, now again loose in Middle Tennessee and Southern Kentucky. If they should succeed in breaking our railroad connections for any considerable length of time, a retrograde movement by our forces cannot be avoided. Whatever the future may have in store for us it is obvious that the rebels are masters of the situation — at least so far as the power to shape it is with them. That they have improved the time of quietude elapsed since the battles to repair damages and gather additional offensive force may be presumed, as the fortunes of the Co
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
can conceive who have passed over them. The present rain will probably double these. One of the roads along the river is rendered unsafe by the bushwhackers firing from the South bank. It was natural for the enemy to attempt to cut the long thread of railroads — over three hundred miles--that alone connects us with the North, by dint of cavalry raids. It is to be hoped that our cavalry will prevent the mischief contemplated by the bands of Wheeler and Forrest, now again loose in Middle Tennessee and Southern Kentucky. If they should succeed in breaking our railroad connections for any considerable length of time, a retrograde movement by our forces cannot be avoided. Whatever the future may have in store for us it is obvious that the rebels are masters of the situation — at least so far as the power to shape it is with them. That they have improved the time of quietude elapsed since the battles to repair damages and gather additional offensive force may be presumed, as t
Ohio (United States) (search for this): article 1
t least so far as the power to shape it is with them. That they have improved the time of quietude elapsed since the battles to repair damages and gather additional offensive force may be presumed, as the fortunes of the Confederacy depend in a great measure upon further successes on their part; and as they have concentrated all their available strength before us, it is not likely that they will lie idle much longer. Without having any positive ground for the theory, I think that if they fall in starving us out of Chattanooga, they will make the flank movement to the left under cover of a cannonade upon our front. As to ourselves, prudence forbids me from saying more than we are not yet in the condition to resume the offensive, although we are able to operate promptly according to the initiative of the enemy. For my part I would deem it cause for congratulation if the enemy should give us an opportunity to meet them in a decisive battle a hundred miles nearer the Ohio river.
Chickamauga Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
er by Gen. Rosecrans or Gen. Burnside, is evident.--A flanking movement to our right is, as already stated, no longer practicable for the enemy. But there was nothing to prevent one to our left in the mentioned direction until to-day. Since midnight the very gates of heaven seem to be opened, and the rain is pouring down in incessant torrents. If the roads be not rendered impracticable by it, we will in all probability see the one hundred and twenty pontoons the enemy have built at Chickamauga Station put to use before long, somewhere between here and Knoxville. It would certainly be the best move they could make. It would give their army once more the benefit of the crops of the rich valley of the Tennessee. It would throw it between Rosecrans's and Burnside's, and compel the latter to beat a hasty retreat to Kentucky to escape annihilation. And lastly, it would force this army to abandon Chattanooga and hunt up the enemy for battle north of the Tennessee. A last element
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
attles, but also that it really never was as far superior as reported. The most direct danger, in view of the temporary state of partial dissolution of the army, was, of course, at first a front attack. The few days' delay of the enemy in closing up with us around the town gave us time to avert it with the axe, pick, and shovel. But although we checked an assault by infantry, we were powerless to remove the danger threatening from their artillery. That with Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain in their possession they can use the latter effectively against us, they have amply proved by their cannonade on the 5th. I use the word "effectively," although they did little actual damage at the time; for their projectiles fell into our camps all along our line, and it must be the veriest tyro in war that will assert that by tripling their guns, which they have it, doubtless, in their power to, could not, by a cannonade of a week, annoy and damage us beyond endurance. It would be t
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
tly weakened in the battles, but also that it really never was as far superior as reported. The most direct danger, in view of the temporary state of partial dissolution of the army, was, of course, at first a front attack. The few days' delay of the enemy in closing up with us around the town gave us time to avert it with the axe, pick, and shovel. But although we checked an assault by infantry, we were powerless to remove the danger threatening from their artillery. That with Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain in their possession they can use the latter effectively against us, they have amply proved by their cannonade on the 5th. I use the word "effectively," although they did little actual damage at the time; for their projectiles fell into our camps all along our line, and it must be the veriest tyro in war that will assert that by tripling their guns, which they have it, doubtless, in their power to, could not, by a cannonade of a week, annoy and damage us beyond endu
n't me. Every few moments a bullet would come whizzing by our ears, which made us run the faster. We threw everything away — guns, pistols, coats, and even our hats. I lost my shoes before I had gone ten rods, but it had been raining all night, and the ground was nice and soft. The rebels were hard after us. If one of their bullets had hit me it would have been in a place where my modesty would always have prevented me from showing the scar. It was there that the superiority of the Anglo-Saxon race over the long tailed inhabitants of this Celestial Empire was seen. In fifteen minutes the Chinese soldiers were half a mile astern. I got into Shanghai that night in about the same state that our father Adam was before his wife made him that first pair of pants.--Now, you needn't write and advise me to try it again, for I shan't do it. I shan't volunteer on any more Quixotic expeditions for the Emperor of China. I have had enough. But I don't count the time as lost. I gained consi
June 28th (search for this): article 2
A Chinese Bull Run. --We make the following extract, says the Bangor (Me.) Whig, from the letter of a young man in China, formerly residing here, to a relative in this city: Shanghai, Sunday, June 28. I must tell you about a second edition of Bull Run that we had here last spring. Shortly after I got back from Japan the commander of the Imperial army sent a force out to take a rebel city, about thirty miles from Shanghai, and I, like a fool, volunteered my services, expecting to see some fun and get some loot. We had about eight hundred Chinese soldiers, but the officers were all English and American. --It took us nearly two days to march thirty miles over ditches and canals, and it was the morning of the third day when we prepared to make the attack. We had four 32 pounders, which we planted within two hundred yards of the walls of the city. We could not see a soul, and were beginning to calculate how much loot we should be likely to get, when one of the Am
Americans (search for this): article 2
ird day when we prepared to make the attack. We had four 32 pounders, which we planted within two hundred yards of the walls of the city. We could not see a soul, and were beginning to calculate how much loot we should be likely to get, when one of the American officers sent a shell into the city to wake them up, and it did wake them up. Before the report died away five thousand rebels were on the walls. The first volley they gave us killed forty Chinese soldiers, one Englishman and two Americans, and we did not wait for another. The Chinese started first, and it was not long be fore we followed suit. I stopped to spike one of the guns, in hopes of seeing my name mentioned in the commanding officer's dispatches, but I saw the rebels coming out of the gates and travelled. Oh! how we ran! It was the devil take the hindmost, and that wasn't me. Every few moments a bullet would come whizzing by our ears, which made us run the faster. We threw everything away — guns, pistols, c
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