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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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For sale. --A No. 1 Cook, and a Washer, Ironer, and Nurse.--We have for sale privately a No. 1 cook; she is about 50 years of age, and as good as any in the State. Also, a woman about 20 years of age, with a young child, who is a good house servant, washer, Ironer, and nurse Hill, Dickinson & Co, oc 31--ts
Dickinson (search for this): article 1
For sale. --A No. 1 Cook, and a Washer, Ironer, and Nurse.--We have for sale privately a No. 1 cook; she is about 50 years of age, and as good as any in the State. Also, a woman about 20 years of age, with a young child, who is a good house servant, washer, Ironer, and nurse Hill, Dickinson & Co, oc 31--ts
For sale. --A No. 1 Cook, and a Washer, Ironer, and Nurse.--We have for sale privately a No. 1 cook; she is about 50 years of age, and as good as any in the State. Also, a woman about 20 years of age, with a young child, who is a good house servant, washer, Ironer, and nurse Hill, Dickinson & Co, oc 31--ts
t the line of communication between Louisville and Rosecrans are about to be renewed. Refugees from Glasgow informed us that the rebels stated that Bragg had passed around tire left of Rosecrans, and had succeeded in flanking him. This intelligence is further shown to be truthful from information from other sources. If this be so, we shall soon have a repetition of the Bragg and Buell campaign, whose character is still fresh in the mind of every person in the North. One year ago last February, I visited Nashville, while the bridge which the retreating rebels had fired was still smoking. I then succeeded in finding but one Union citizen. Truth compels me to add, that after a lapse of nearly two years, during which the people have enjoyed all the rights and blessings of Federal occupation, there is not quite as much resident Union sentiment as there was during my first visit. "Your Administration has done Jeff Davis good service since that time," said a citizen this morning
Rosecrans (search for this): article 1
as hurt, and as I was the only one who saw the guerillas there was nobody except myself scared. These daring movements on the part of the rebels show that operations with a view to interrupt the line of communication between Louisville and Rosecrans are about to be renewed. Refugees from Glasgow informed us that the rebels stated that Bragg had passed around tire left of Rosecrans, and had succeeded in flanking him. This intelligence is further shown to be truthful from information from oRosecrans, and had succeeded in flanking him. This intelligence is further shown to be truthful from information from other sources. If this be so, we shall soon have a repetition of the Bragg and Buell campaign, whose character is still fresh in the mind of every person in the North. One year ago last February, I visited Nashville, while the bridge which the retreating rebels had fired was still smoking. I then succeeded in finding but one Union citizen. Truth compels me to add, that after a lapse of nearly two years, during which the people have enjoyed all the rights and blessings of Federal occupati
hree bullets passed through the car. Several others struck into the wood work, and glanced off without penetrating to the interior. Fortunately, nobody was hurt, and as I was the only one who saw the guerillas there was nobody except myself scared. These daring movements on the part of the rebels show that operations with a view to interrupt the line of communication between Louisville and Rosecrans are about to be renewed. Refugees from Glasgow informed us that the rebels stated that Bragg had passed around tire left of Rosecrans, and had succeeded in flanking him. This intelligence is further shown to be truthful from information from other sources. If this be so, we shall soon have a repetition of the Bragg and Buell campaign, whose character is still fresh in the mind of every person in the North. One year ago last February, I visited Nashville, while the bridge which the retreating rebels had fired was still smoking. I then succeeded in finding but one Union citizen
us that a force of rebels had that morning attacked and taken Glasgow — an important point, only seven miles from the railroad — and ordered us to proceed very cautionary, as it was expected that they would attempt to capture our train. We felt our way along slowly till we reached Cave City, at which point we found a lot of fugitives just in from Glasgow. The whole affair is a most shameful one. Glasgow was garrisoned by 220 twelve months men of the 37th Kentucky volunteers, under Col. Martin. They had fortifications, two pieces of artillery, and sufficient supplies to have held this place a mouth against 5,000 men. The rebels were mounted, numbered eighty-two, and were commanded by a Col. Hughes. At daybreak yesterday morning they dashed into the town, completely surprised the garrison, and captured it without half a dozen shots being fired. They remained an hour or two, took $40,000 from the bank, sacked the town, took what good horses they could find, and then left south
ttempt to capture our train. We felt our way along slowly till we reached Cave City, at which point we found a lot of fugitives just in from Glasgow. The whole affair is a most shameful one. Glasgow was garrisoned by 220 twelve months men of the 37th Kentucky volunteers, under Col. Martin. They had fortifications, two pieces of artillery, and sufficient supplies to have held this place a mouth against 5,000 men. The rebels were mounted, numbered eighty-two, and were commanded by a Col. Hughes. At daybreak yesterday morning they dashed into the town, completely surprised the garrison, and captured it without half a dozen shots being fired. They remained an hour or two, took $40,000 from the bank, sacked the town, took what good horses they could find, and then left southwards. Our train reached Bowling Green and came on without being disturbed. Just before dark we passed a small station called Franklin, at which there are some Federal troops. We had passed if not more
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Affairs in Tennessee--the capture of Glasgow. A letter from Nashville to a Yankee journal given the following particulars of the recent rebel said on Glasgow, Tennessee: When we reached Munfordsville, a dispatch from Bowling Green informed us that a force of rebels had that morning attacked and taken Glasgow — an important point, only seven miles from the railroad — and ordered us to proceed very cautionary, as it was expected that they would attempt to capture our train. We felt our way along slowly till we reached Cave City, at which point we found a lot of fugitives just in from Glasgow. The whole affair is a most shameful one. Glasgow was garrisoned by 220 twelve months men of the 37th Kentucky volunteers, under Col. Martin. They had fortifications, two pieces of artillery, and sufficient supplies to have held this place a mouth against 5,000 men. The rebels were mounted, numbered eighty-two, and were commanded by a Col. Hughes. At daybreak yesterday morning
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
Affairs in Tennessee--the capture of Glasgow. A letter from Nashville to a Yankee journal given the following particulars of the recent rebel said on Glasgow, Tennessee: When we reached Munfordsville, a dispatch from Bowling Green informed us that a force of rebels had that morning attacked and taken Glasgow — an important point, only seven miles from the railroad — and ordered us to proceed very cautionary, as it was expected that they would attempt to capture our train. We felt ourprised the garrison, and captured it without half a dozen shots being fired. They remained an hour or two, took $40,000 from the bank, sacked the town, took what good horses they could find, and then left southwards. Our train reached Bowling Green and came on without being disturbed. Just before dark we passed a small station called Franklin, at which there are some Federal troops. We had passed if not more than a quarter of a mile when we reached an open field, in which, and not mor
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