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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 4 results.

Frederick Gibson (search for this): article 4
Release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore. --The imprisonment and subsequent release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore, by the Federal authorities there, has been noticed. The following is a copy of the letter which caused his arrest: Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1863. Gen. G. C. Thomas, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir --YourRev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore, by the Federal authorities there, has been noticed. The following is a copy of the letter which caused his arrest: Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1863. Gen. G. C. Thomas, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir --Your favor of the 21st instant reached me last evening. I should be most happy to receive your son, but think it only proper to inform you that in the unhappy differences which now distract the country all my pupils this year, without exception, advocate the Southern side. In view of this, I fear your son would not find it pleasant hshould be most happy to receive your son, but think it only proper to inform you that in the unhappy differences which now distract the country all my pupils this year, without exception, advocate the Southern side. In view of this, I fear your son would not find it pleasant here. Yours, very respectfully, Frederick Gibson,
G. C. Thomas (search for this): article 4
Release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore. --The imprisonment and subsequent release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore, by the Federal authorities there, has been noticed. The following is a copy of the letter which caused his arrest: Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1863. Gen. G. C. Thomas, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir --Your favor of the 21st instant reached me last evening. I should be most happy to receive your son, but think it only proper to inform you that in the unhappy differences which now distract the country all my pupils this year, without exception, advocate the Southern side. In view of this, I fear your son would not find it pleasant here. Yours, very respectfully, Frederick Gibson,
Release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore. --The imprisonment and subsequent release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore, by the Federal authorities there, has been noticed. The following is a copy of the letter which caused his arrest: Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1863. Gen. G. C. Thomas, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir --Your favor of the 21st instant reached me last evening. I should be most happy to receive your son, but think it only proper to inform you that in the unhappy differences which now distract the country all my pupils this year, without exception, advocate the Southern side. In view of this, I fear your son would not find it pleasant here. Yours, very respectfully, Frederick Gibson,
September 24th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 4
Release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore. --The imprisonment and subsequent release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore, by the Federal authorities there, has been noticed. The following is a copy of the letter which caused his arrest: Baltimore, Sept. 24, 1863. Gen. G. C. Thomas, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir --Your favor of the 21st instant reached me last evening. I should be most happy to receive your son, but think it only proper to inform you that in the unhappy differences which now distract the country all my pupils this year, without exception, advocate the Southern side. In view of this, I fear your son would not find it pleasant here. Yours, very respectfully, Frederick Gibson,