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Edenton (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
ounced life extinct. The body was then cut down and placed in the coffin, to be delivered to his family. Thus has Dr. David M. Wright paid the forfeit of his life for shooting, in cold blood, Lieut. Sanborn, of the United States colored troops, in the early part of July last. Since the commission of the deed he has endeavored to justify himself in it. He was a man of strong Southern feelings, and this, in a measure, may have prompted him to commit the act. He came to the city from Edenton, N. C., about twenty-five years ago, and commenced the practice of medicine, in which he was very successful until the occupation of this city by our troops. In appearance he may be described as being rather tall, slightly bent in the shoulders, with a large frame, though somewhat lean; his eyes dark, with heavy brows, long hair, which extended to the shoulders, of the same color as his moustache and goatee, which were iron gray, but evidently in his younger days very black. The family which
After viewing the procession, which was drawn up into line, he advanced towards the hearse and requested that the lid of his coffin might be removed, so that he could take a last view of his family, whose portraits were arranged all along the sides just above the head. He seemed to realize his awful position, though he seemed to be little dejected, and marched with a firm step. He entered his carriage in company with Capt. Sheppard. Assistant Provost Marshal, Rev. Messrs. Rodman and Overson. The procession, under command of Col. Keese, moved forwad in the following order: A small detachment of mounted men, martial corps and infantry guard, hearse, carriage containing Dr. Wright and clergymen, carriage containing other clergymen. The 118th New York, and 21st Connecticut regiments brought up the rear. There were few to be seen on the thoroughfares through which the procession passed, except negroes. But the solemn line was viewed from the houses by many. In a number of
David M. Wright (search for this): article 4
The execution of Dr. Wright at Norfolk — further particulars. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer furnishes that paper with a detailed account of the execution of Dr. D. M. Wright, of Norfolk, Va., on the 23d ult. It appears that at one time Dr. W. had nearly effected his escape from prison.--The letter says: On Wednesday Dr. Wright made a request that a light should be furnished him in his cell that evening. Strange as the request was, no one regarded it with any suspicionmined by Dr. Conover, the Medical Director, Dr. J. H. Lee, of the 21st Connecticut, and several other surgeons, who pronounced life extinct. The body was then cut down and placed in the coffin, to be delivered to his family. Thus has Dr. David M. Wright paid the forfeit of his life for shooting, in cold blood, Lieut. Sanborn, of the United States colored troops, in the early part of July last. Since the commission of the deed he has endeavored to justify himself in it. He was a man of st
onnecticut regiment, stepped from the platform and pulled the rope attached to the bar which supported the drop. All this time a breathless stillness prevailed, and as the doctor descended through the trap a shudder appeared to run through every one present.--He fell without a struggle. His death must have been instantaneous, as not a motion was perceived. It was a few minutes after 10 when the signal to lower the trap was given. The body after hanging a half hour, was examined by Dr. Conover, the Medical Director, Dr. J. H. Lee, of the 21st Connecticut, and several other surgeons, who pronounced life extinct. The body was then cut down and placed in the coffin, to be delivered to his family. Thus has Dr. David M. Wright paid the forfeit of his life for shooting, in cold blood, Lieut. Sanborn, of the United States colored troops, in the early part of July last. Since the commission of the deed he has endeavored to justify himself in it. He was a man of strong Southern f
John Armstrong (search for this): article 4
he order for execution was also read. The Doctor listened to them calmly, and without evincing any emotion. Dr. Rodman now offered up a prayer, at the conclusion of which Dr. Wright advanced a few steps forward, and in a tremulous voice said, "Gentlemen, the act which I committed was done without the slightest malice." His hands were now tied. Rending on his knees, he prayed most fervently for a few minutes. Upon arising, the cap was adjusted over his face, and the executioner, Mr. John Armstrong, of Co. B, 21st Connecticut regiment, stepped from the platform and pulled the rope attached to the bar which supported the drop. All this time a breathless stillness prevailed, and as the doctor descended through the trap a shudder appeared to run through every one present.--He fell without a struggle. His death must have been instantaneous, as not a motion was perceived. It was a few minutes after 10 when the signal to lower the trap was given. The body after hanging a half h
D. M. Wright (search for this): article 4
The execution of Dr. Wright at Norfolk — further particulars. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirfrom prison.--The letter says: On Wednesday Dr. Wright made a request that a light should be furnished hd the street, exclaimed, "By--,I believe that was Dr. Wright in disguise." Lieut. Cook, who was sitting among hem he exclaimed, "That's played out; I know you, Dr. Wright," at the same time lifting up two heavy veils thaved to be as the Lieutenant had asserted. It was Dr. Wright, and he appeared to be but little surprised or emring everything for the execution. At 9 o'clock, Dr. Wright was taken from his cell and conducted through thes and infantry guard, hearse, carriage containing Dr. Wright and clergymen, carriage containing other clergymehe gallows. The procession passing inside of it, Dr. Wright's carriage was halted before the scaffold, which w offered up a prayer, at the conclusion of which Dr. Wright advanced a few steps forward, and in a tremulous
ave been instantaneous, as not a motion was perceived. It was a few minutes after 10 when the signal to lower the trap was given. The body after hanging a half hour, was examined by Dr. Conover, the Medical Director, Dr. J. H. Lee, of the 21st Connecticut, and several other surgeons, who pronounced life extinct. The body was then cut down and placed in the coffin, to be delivered to his family. Thus has Dr. David M. Wright paid the forfeit of his life for shooting, in cold blood, Lieut. Sanborn, of the United States colored troops, in the early part of July last. Since the commission of the deed he has endeavored to justify himself in it. He was a man of strong Southern feelings, and this, in a measure, may have prompted him to commit the act. He came to the city from Edenton, N. C., about twenty-five years ago, and commenced the practice of medicine, in which he was very successful until the occupation of this city by our troops. In appearance he may be described as being ra
here were few to be seen on the thoroughfares through which the procession passed, except negroes. But the solemn line was viewed from the houses by many. In a number of instances women were observed crying. The spot selected for the site of execution was the old Fair Grounds. In the centre of them the gallows was erected. At a few minutes before ten o'clock the procession reached here. Already the Eighth and Fifteenth Connecticut regiments, the Fourth Rhode Island regiment and Regan's battery, were drawn up in a hollow square around the gallows. The procession passing inside of it, Dr. Wright's carriage was halted before the scaffold, which he mounted without any apparent nervousness, assisted by Dr. Rodman and another clergyman.--From the scaffold Captain Sheppard now read the charges, finding and sentence of the court by which the condemned was tried. The order for execution was also read. The Doctor listened to them calmly, and without evincing any emotion. D
d small son. They all entered their father's cell, and after remaining a short time, the whole party, apparently, retired. To gain the street they had to pass through a little anteroom in the prison, which is occupied by its officers for the transaction of business. Here, one of the party, entering through a door, slightly stumbled. This was noticed by one of the turnkeys, who, after they had just cleverly reached the street, exclaimed, "By--,I believe that was Dr. Wright in disguise." Lieut. Cook, who was sitting among those present in the room, rushed out and intercepted the party before they had gotten many steps. Walking up to one of them he exclaimed, "That's played out; I know you, Dr. Wright," at the same time lifting up two heavy veils that concealed the face. It proved to be as the Lieutenant had asserted. It was Dr. Wright, and he appeared to be but little surprised or embarrassed at the detection, and on being conducted inside the jail remarked that "desperate mea
of his family, whose portraits were arranged all along the sides just above the head. He seemed to realize his awful position, though he seemed to be little dejected, and marched with a firm step. He entered his carriage in company with Capt. Sheppard. Assistant Provost Marshal, Rev. Messrs. Rodman and Overson. The procession, under command of Col. Keese, moved forwad in the following order: A small detachment of mounted men, martial corps and infantry guard, hearse, carriage containing Dhollow square around the gallows. The procession passing inside of it, Dr. Wright's carriage was halted before the scaffold, which he mounted without any apparent nervousness, assisted by Dr. Rodman and another clergyman.--From the scaffold Captain Sheppard now read the charges, finding and sentence of the court by which the condemned was tried. The order for execution was also read. The Doctor listened to them calmly, and without evincing any emotion. Dr. Rodman now offered up a prayer,
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