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cements are coming to Thomas, and this we had learned from other sources. As the bold and unscrupulous leader of the bushwhackers in East Tennessee, he has been a terror to the Southern people in that quarter. Among the papers found upon his person was a general pass from Burnside to go in and out of his lines at pleasure, and the following precious document: Headq'rs in the Field,Oct. 3d, 1863. Special Orders, No. --. Col. Clift is hereby authorized to proceed to Rhea, Hamilton, and the adjoining counties, for the purpose of recruiting for the U. S. service. By command of Maj.-Gen. Burnside. R. H. J. Goddard, Capt. and A. D. C., A. A. A. G. Now what will the virtuous Burnside say If Gen. Bragg should hang the aforesaid Col. Clift by the neck until he be dead, in retaliation for his execution of Confederate officers caught recruiting within his lines? Will it make any difference, in his judgment, if the Federal ox should be gored by the Confederate
E. P. Alexander (search for this): article 1
all day. They destroyed the Half-way House (Mr. Craven's) last week, and have since driven our signal corps from Lookout Point. Their guns, though situated far below and on the other side of the Tennessee, carry to the very top of Lookout Mountain. They opened fire very unexpectedly at one o'clock night before last; but whether it was the man in the moon they were firing at, or a jack o'lantern seen bogging about the river banks, we have not yet been able to ascertain. To-day Major E. P. Alexander moved four of his splendid 24-pounder rifle guns to Lookout Point and put them in position to return the fire of the Moccasin batteries. To-morrow we shall probably enjoy a novel if not a profitable spectacle — that of a grand but harmless artillery duel between hostile batteries, situated on opposite sides of a wide river, the one on a high hill and the other on a mountain far above it. But it is dull in camp, and the army is in want of a sensation, so let the firing proceed. It h
Rosecrans (search for this): article 1
Federal Government has just committed its second greatest blunder. I allude to the removal of Rosecrans and the appointment of Thomas to succeed him. McClellan is the best organizer of forces among all the Federal officers; Rosecrans the ablest campaigner and the best fighter. A great blunder was committed when the former was removed; a second blunder, almost as great, has just been made ular with the Confederates, and even Gen. Bragg does not object to it. Officers who have known Rosecrans and Thomas both well for many years say we have made a gain by the exchange equivalent to 10,000 men; in other words, that Rosecrans is the better man of the two by 10,000 men. Thomas is a good fighter when he gets warmed up to the work; but ordinarily he is a slow man, and possesses neither berland, Chattanooga, Oct. 20th, 1863. General --I regret to have to inform you that Gen. Rosecrans was relieved from duty with this army yesterday, and that I have been placed in command. Th
McClellan (search for this): article 1
From Gen. Bragg's Army. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Tennessee Near Chattanooga, Oct. 26, 1863. The Federal Government has just committed its second greatest blunder. I allude to the removal of Rosecrans and the appointment of Thomas to succeed him. McClellan is the best organizer of forces among all the Federal officers; Rosecrans the ablest campaigner and the best fighter. A great blunder was committed when the former was removed; a second blunder, almost as great, has just been made in the removal of the latter. The change is very popular with the Confederates, and even Gen. Bragg does not object to it. Officers who have known Rosecrans and Thomas both well for many years say we have made a gain by the exchange equivalent to 10,000 men; in other words, that Rosecrans is the better man of the two by 10,000 men. Thomas is a good fighter when he gets warmed up to the work; but ordinarily he is a slow man, and possesses neither the gift to organize an army
sons guilty of pillaging will be severely punished, unless it be shown that they are receiving less than half rations. This is significant. Some of his pickets have offered to exchange an overcoat or a pair of shoes with our pickets for a gallon of meal. At other points on the lines, however, they say they have sufficient supplies. The reinforcements--two corps d'armes--sent out from Meade's army under Hooker are at Bridgeport. They number about 12,000 men. One corps is commanded by Slocum, the other by Williams. The river at Bridgeport is divided by an island of considerable length. Two pontoon bridges have been thrown across from the north bank to the island, and at last accounts preparations were being made to lay a third bridge from the island to the south bank. This latter work has probably been completed by this time. Hooker's pickets cover Sand Mountain to the distance of eight or ten miles this side of Bridgeport. Sherman, with other reinforcements, supposed
le — that of a grand but harmless artillery duel between hostile batteries, situated on opposite sides of a wide river, the one on a high hill and the other on a mountain far above it. But it is dull in camp, and the army is in want of a sensation, so let the firing proceed. It has long been known that a man on the ground may shoot a squirrel in the tree-top, but it remains to be shown whether a man in the tree can hit the squirrel on the ground. Hood's division, now commanded by Brig. Gen. Jenkins, occupies the left of our lines, including Lookout Mountain. Gen. Laws's brigade forms a part of the division. The question of supplies is giving the Federal commander much trouble. Gen. Thomas issued an order a few days ago, in which he declares that all persons guilty of pillaging will be severely punished, unless it be shown that they are receiving less than half rations. This is significant. Some of his pickets have offered to exchange an overcoat or a pair of shoes with ou
commander much trouble. Gen. Thomas issued an order a few days ago, in which he declares that all persons guilty of pillaging will be severely punished, unless it be shown that they are receiving less than half rations. This is significant. Some of his pickets have offered to exchange an overcoat or a pair of shoes with our pickets for a gallon of meal. At other points on the lines, however, they say they have sufficient supplies. The reinforcements--two corps d'armes--sent out from Meade's army under Hooker are at Bridgeport. They number about 12,000 men. One corps is commanded by Slocum, the other by Williams. The river at Bridgeport is divided by an island of considerable length. Two pontoon bridges have been thrown across from the north bank to the island, and at last accounts preparations were being made to lay a third bridge from the island to the south bank. This latter work has probably been completed by this time. Hooker's pickets cover Sand Mountain to the dist
George H. Thomas (search for this): article 1
he removal of Rosecrans and the appointment of Thomas to succeed him. McClellan is the best orgt to it. Officers who have known Rosecrans and Thomas both well for many years say we have made a gans is the better man of the two by 10,000 men. Thomas is a good fighter when he gets warmed up to thentering the service of the Confederates. Thomas was an ardent Southern Rights man up to the tievery man had his price, and it may be Gen. George H. Thomas had his. The following letter fro, wounded and prisoners. Yours truly, George H. Thomas, Major Gen'l Com'dg. Maj.-Genexcept that heavy reinforcements are coming to Thomas, and this we had learned from other sources. r successfully made. During last night Gen. Thomas threw a pontoon bridge across the river, twgiving the Federal commander much trouble. Gen. Thomas issued an order a few days ago, in which hes follows: The main army at Chattanooga, under Thomas, exclusive of cavalry, 50,000 men; the left wi[2 more...]
en. George H. Thomas had his. The following letter from Gen. Thomas to Gen. Burnside, notifying the latter of the change in the command of the Army of the Cumbe that quarter. Among the papers found upon his person was a general pass from Burnside to go in and out of his lines at pleasure, and the following precious documenties, for the purpose of recruiting for the U. S. service. By command of Maj.-Gen. Burnside. R. H. J. Goddard, Capt. and A. D. C., A. A. A. G. Now whatte bull? Another paper found upon Col. Clift is a printed address from Gen. Burnside to the "loyal citizens" of East Tennessee, in which he invites them to formal weeks to replace the bridge across the Tennessee at Decatur. Meanwhile Burnside holds Knoxville with a force of 15,000 men. It is believed that be, too, is enclusive of cavalry, 50,000 men; the left wing at Knoxville and vicinity, under Burnside, 15,000; the right wing, consisting of reinforcements sent from the Potomac, u
.--The ground is unfavorable to military operations, consisting of muddy flats and mountain spurs, covered with rocks and timber. There are but two ways by which we can send reinforcements to the scene of action--one by a tedious and circuitous route to the left; the other around the north end of Lookout, where they would be exposed to the fire of the Moccasin batteries. These batteries have been shelling Lookout and our lines in that direction all day. They destroyed the Half-way House (Mr. Craven's) last week, and have since driven our signal corps from Lookout Point. Their guns, though situated far below and on the other side of the Tennessee, carry to the very top of Lookout Mountain. They opened fire very unexpectedly at one o'clock night before last; but whether it was the man in the moon they were firing at, or a jack o'lantern seen bogging about the river banks, we have not yet been able to ascertain. To-day Major E. P. Alexander moved four of his splendid 24-pounder r
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