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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 1
" As soon as they shall have organized themselves into companies he promises to supply them with arms, which they can take home with them, for their own defence, until such time as they may be needed, when they will be called out and formed into regiments. You will probably hear further news from Louden, or its vicinity, before this reaches you. Sallust. Army of Tennessee, Chattanooga Valley, Oct. 27, 1863. Reference was made in a late letter to a sudden bend in the Tennessee river, a few miles below Chattanooga, where the enemy's wagons, passing to and from Bridgeport, were exposed to the fire of our sharpshooters posted on the Southern bank of the river, and the opinion was expressed that the enemy would not abandon this (the lower or river) road without making a strong effort to keep it open. Well, that effort has been made, and thus far successfully made. During last night Gen. Thomas threw a pontoon bridge across the river, two miles below Lookout point
Decatur (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
vancing along the Memphis and Charleston railroad from the west, rebuilding the bridges and repairing the track as he comes. At the last advices he was at Tuscumbia. Johnson's cavalry is in his front, tearing up the road, burning the stringers and cross-ties, heating and bending the iron rails, and destroying the bridges. At this rate it is not probable that he will reach Bridgeport before the first of February. It will require several weeks to replace the bridge across the Tennessee at Decatur. Meanwhile Burnside holds Knoxville with a force of 15,000 men. It is believed that be, too, is engaged in repairing the military bridges in East Tennessee, with a view of opening communications with the main army at Chattanooga. Thus we have the enemy's forces in this quarter distributed as follows: The main army at Chattanooga, under Thomas, exclusive of cavalry, 50,000 men; the left wing at Knoxville and vicinity, under Burnside, 15,000; the right wing, consisting of reinforcem
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
who, instead of accepting it, advised him to take a furlough and proceed to Richmond, and send in his resignation from that point, especially as it would enable him to travel that far free of expense. He acted upon the suggestion, went to Richmond, made a written application to Governor Letcher (which application is now on file in Richmond) for service in the Virginia State Guard, and then went North for his family. He had married in Troy, N. Y., and owned considerable property in the United States, which he desired to secure. He never returned, the presumption being that he was seduced by tempting offers from the Federal Government, or was dissuaded by his wife from entering the service of the Confederates. Thomas was an ardent Southern Rights man up to the time he left Richmond. The leopard must have changed his spots, or the Ethiopian his skin, if this Secessionist can find pleasure or honor in an association with negro soldiers and negro officers. But Cœsar said every
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
direction all day. They destroyed the Half-way House (Mr. Craven's) last week, and have since driven our signal corps from Lookout Point. Their guns, though situated far below and on the other side of the Tennessee, carry to the very top of Lookout Mountain. They opened fire very unexpectedly at one o'clock night before last; but whether it was the man in the moon they were firing at, or a jack o'lantern seen bogging about the river banks, we have not yet been able to ascertain. To-day Maon the ground may shoot a squirrel in the tree-top, but it remains to be shown whether a man in the tree can hit the squirrel on the ground. Hood's division, now commanded by Brig. Gen. Jenkins, occupies the left of our lines, including Lookout Mountain. Gen. Laws's brigade forms a part of the division. The question of supplies is giving the Federal commander much trouble. Gen. Thomas issued an order a few days ago, in which he declares that all persons guilty of pillaging will be sev
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
the person of Col. Clift, the chief of the tory bushwhackers in East Tennessee, who was captured by some of our scouts and brought into Gen. B placed in command. The Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee, have been thrown into one grand division, to be called the Divis Maj.-Gen. Burnsides, commanding Department Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Col. Clift, the bearer of this letter or dispatch, is an oles. As the bold and unscrupulous leader of the bushwhackers in East Tennessee, he has been a terror to the Southern people in that quarter. a printed address from Gen. Burnside to the "loyal citizens" of East Tennessee, in which he invites them to form themselves into companies, to be known as the "National Guard of East Tennessee." As soon as they shall have organized themselves into companies he promises to supply themd that be, too, is engaged in repairing the military bridges in East Tennessee, with a view of opening communications with the main army at Ch
Moccasin (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
th rocks and timber. There are but two ways by which we can send reinforcements to the scene of action--one by a tedious and circuitous route to the left; the other around the north end of Lookout, where they would be exposed to the fire of the Moccasin batteries. These batteries have been shelling Lookout and our lines in that direction all day. They destroyed the Half-way House (Mr. Craven's) last week, and have since driven our signal corps from Lookout Point. Their guns, though situated fr a jack o'lantern seen bogging about the river banks, we have not yet been able to ascertain. To-day Major E. P. Alexander moved four of his splendid 24-pounder rifle guns to Lookout Point and put them in position to return the fire of the Moccasin batteries. To-morrow we shall probably enjoy a novel if not a profitable spectacle — that of a grand but harmless artillery duel between hostile batteries, situated on opposite sides of a wide river, the one on a high hill and the other on a mo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
, under Hooker, 12,000; other reinforcements from Grant's army, advancing from the west under Sherman, to form a junction with the right wing, 15,000. Total, 92,000. Add to this 15,000 cavalry, and we have an army gathering for the invasion of Georgia under the supreme guidance of Grant of 107,000 men. To meet this army, to defeat and overcome it, will require the best skill, the highest courage, and the most persevering and united efforts of the Confederates. This doubtful whether anotmen. To meet this army, to defeat and overcome it, will require the best skill, the highest courage, and the most persevering and united efforts of the Confederates. This doubtful whether another invasion will be attempted before the early spring, by which time the enemy hopes to be able to reopen the railway line from Memphis to Knoxville, and concentrate his vast army for one fell swoop upon Georgia. Whether he will be allowed to concentrate that army is another question. Sallust.
Troy, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
Twiggs, the officer then in command in the Southwest, who, instead of accepting it, advised him to take a furlough and proceed to Richmond, and send in his resignation from that point, especially as it would enable him to travel that far free of expense. He acted upon the suggestion, went to Richmond, made a written application to Governor Letcher (which application is now on file in Richmond) for service in the Virginia State Guard, and then went North for his family. He had married in Troy, N. Y., and owned considerable property in the United States, which he desired to secure. He never returned, the presumption being that he was seduced by tempting offers from the Federal Government, or was dissuaded by his wife from entering the service of the Confederates. Thomas was an ardent Southern Rights man up to the time he left Richmond. The leopard must have changed his spots, or the Ethiopian his skin, if this Secessionist can find pleasure or honor in an association with neg
Chattanooga Valley (United States) (search for this): article 1
nvites them to form themselves into companies, to be known as the "National Guard of East Tennessee." As soon as they shall have organized themselves into companies he promises to supply them with arms, which they can take home with them, for their own defence, until such time as they may be needed, when they will be called out and formed into regiments. You will probably hear further news from Louden, or its vicinity, before this reaches you. Sallust. Army of Tennessee, Chattanooga Valley, Oct. 27, 1863. Reference was made in a late letter to a sudden bend in the Tennessee river, a few miles below Chattanooga, where the enemy's wagons, passing to and from Bridgeport, were exposed to the fire of our sharpshooters posted on the Southern bank of the river, and the opinion was expressed that the enemy would not abandon this (the lower or river) road without making a strong effort to keep it open. Well, that effort has been made, and thus far successfully made. D
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
wn into one grand division, to be called the Division of the Mississippi, and placed under the command of Gen. Grant, we commanding our armies under him. Gen. Grant will be here in a few days. Cannot you come down to meet him? Col. Clift will explain to you my situation and prospects, and thanking you for sending him down, I hope you will send him again, until we can get more rapid communication by telegraph. If not molested within a week I will try to have a telegraph line put up to Kingston. Our cavalry have gained considerable advantage over the enemies cavalry during their late raids against the railroads. The enemies loss five pieces artillery, over two thousand killed, wounded and prisoners. Yours truly, George H. Thomas, Major Gen'l Com'dg. Maj.-Gen. Burnsides, commanding Department Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Col. Clift, the bearer of this letter or dispatch, is an old man, very shrewd and self- possessed.--Nothing could be got out of him exc
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