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Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
of slave soil, and not till then." Gen. Crittenden's farewell to his corps. The following is the farewell order of Maj.-Gen. Crittenden to his corps upon his removal from command: Headq'rs 21st Army corps, Chattanooga, Oct. 10, 1863. To the Officers and Soldiers of the Twenty-First Army Corps: The General commanding announces with sorrow that the name of this corps has been stricken from the army rolls, and that he has been relieved from duty and ordered to report to Indianapolis, that his conduct in the late battles at Chickamauga may be investigated. The General commanding regrets the separation from his command, not the investigation. Investigation, the closest scrutiny, however if may affect him, can only brighten your fame. Your deeds at Chickamauga, as at Stone river, will hand down to posterity your honored names. You have honored me! The mighty hand of the Twenty-First Army Corps has graven the name of its commander on famous pages of the past
Peninsula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 2
Administration will not take it because it was chosen by Gen. McClellan. It says: Now we were not aware that Gen. McClellan had taken out a patent for the Peninsula line of operations against Richmond, though we had supposed that the lamentable failure he made in his attempt to reach the Rebel capital by this route, would nois done there will be a very serious obstacle to our getting there by any route. On the face of the map there is certainly nothing in either the overland or the Peninsula line to Richmond that need much embarrass an advance. They are both good enough, and we do not know that there is much to choose between them. From the line of which, put into comparison with Rosecrans's great march from Murfreesboro' to Chattanooga, is but child's play. In the mere matter of the territorial march the Peninsula line is undoubtedly the shorter; but this route has the counterbalancing disadvantages which always attach to military operations dependent on a water line for a
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 2
. In the course of the conversation Mr. Benjamin asked Mr. Botts how long he thought the war would last. The latter replied that he could tell if he only knew how long the South could raise men. When they could no longer fill up their ranks the war would stop. In his turn Mr. Botts asked the Secretary if he still adhered to his opinion, expressed at the commencement of the rebellion, that the war should be continued till they had every part of slave soil, including Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, &c. Mr. Benjamin said that he did. Mr. Botts, who happened to have an apple in his hand, cutting off a slice, said: "That represents Kentucky, which you have lost." Another still represented Tennessee, and a third Louisiana. Vicksburg and the Mississippi were shown by a cut of the apple that penetrated to its very core. Finally, when Mr. Botts had cut away more than half the apple, he said: "Now, Mr. Benjamin, when you can put the severed pieces of that apple together again as nature fir
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
check and thus lessening the task of our army in Tennessee. Whether or not Gen. Meade should at present attempt a new campaign against Richmond, is, therefore, simply a question of the relative strength of the two armies, and the cant about the "road to Richmond," and the ascription of any special magical virtues to that by the Peninsula, is the dictate either of an unintelligible stupidity or of a very intelligible factiousness. Gen. Scott--his last words. The "veteran hero" of Bull Run, Gen. Winfield Scott, has returned to New York and taken rooms at Delmonico's. The New York papers say a great many of the personal admirers of the Venerable Humbug have called to "have a shake of the distinguished old soldier's hand." A "A "personal admirer," connected with the New York Times, called and prints the important results of the visit: He was cordially welcomed by the General, whom he found ing the society of two lads, his grandchildren. The veteran is pleased to see his
Greensburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
ved in safety, but the rest of the party have not yet appeared. Guerillas again at work in Kentucky. The Louisville Democrat announces that a force of guerillas are again at work in that State. They number from 200 to 700, and are commanded by the "notorious" Richardson. It says: They entered the town of Columbia, Adair county, on Tuesday night, robbed the stores of their contents and stole all the good horses in the neighborhood, when they left in the direction of Greensburg, Green county. On Wednesday morning they reached Greensburg and captured the place without any resistance. Here they also robbed the stores and carried off all the good horses in the neighborhood. They robbed the bank at this place of $16,000 in Kentucky money and $9,000 in greenbacks. After committing all manner of depredations they left, moving in the direction of Bardstown. At a late hour on Thursday night they reached Bardstown and entered the place without opposition, as no Federal
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
l up their ranks the war would stop. In his turn Mr. Botts asked the Secretary if he still adhered to his opinion, expressed at the commencement of the rebellion, that the war should be continued till they had every part of slave soil, including Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, &c. Mr. Benjamin said that he did. Mr. Botts, who happened to have an apple in his hand, cutting off a slice, said: "That represents Kentucky, which you have lost." Another still represented Tennessee, and a third Louisiana. Vicksburg and the Mississippi were shown by a cut of the apple that penetrated to its very core. Finally, when Mr. Botts had cut away more than half the apple, he said: "Now, Mr. Benjamin, when you can put the severed pieces of that apple together again as nature first joined them, you may hope to reconquer every foot of slave soil, and not till then." Gen. Crittenden's farewell to his corps. The following is the farewell order of Maj.-Gen. Crittenden to his corps upon his rem
Greensburg (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
appeared. Guerillas again at work in Kentucky. The Louisville Democrat announces that a force of guerillas are again at work in that State. They number from 200 to 700, and are commanded by the "notorious" Richardson. It says: They entered the town of Columbia, Adair county, on Tuesday night, robbed the stores of their contents and stole all the good horses in the neighborhood, when they left in the direction of Greensburg, Green county. On Wednesday morning they reached Greensburg and captured the place without any resistance. Here they also robbed the stores and carried off all the good horses in the neighborhood. They robbed the bank at this place of $16,000 in Kentucky money and $9,000 in greenbacks. After committing all manner of depredations they left, moving in the direction of Bardstown. At a late hour on Thursday night they reached Bardstown and entered the place without opposition, as no Federal troops were stationed there.--Here they burned (as our
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
the bank at this place of $16,000 in Kentucky money and $9,000 in greenbacks. After committing all manner of depredations they left, moving in the direction of Bardstown. At a late hour on Thursday night they reached Bardstown and entered the place without opposition, as no Federal troops were stationed there.--Here they burBardstown and entered the place without opposition, as no Federal troops were stationed there.--Here they burned (as our informant states) the depot, together with a locomotive, five or six cars, and some ten thousand bushels of wheat, besides a large quantity of produce and provisions. Here, as elsewhere, they entered the stores and robbed them of everything of value that they contained. They cut the telegraph wires, but did no damage to the train. Early yesterday morning they left Bardstown, but in what direction they moved we have not been informed. It is the general belief that they moved off towards the Lebanon branch of the Nashville road. More arrests in New York — Seward's Bell Ringing again. The Herald, of Thursday, says: United States
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
e will quickly seize. If he does not venture to make this subtraction, owing to the menace of Meade's presence, the Army of the Potomac will still be serving the purpose of keeping that force in check and thus lessening the task of our army in Tennessee. Whether or not Gen. Meade should at present attempt a new campaign against Richmond, is, therefore, simply a question of the relative strength of the two armies, and the cant about the "road to Richmond," and the ascription of any special magf slave soil, including Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, &c. Mr. Benjamin said that he did. Mr. Botts, who happened to have an apple in his hand, cutting off a slice, said: "That represents Kentucky, which you have lost." Another still represented Tennessee, and a third Louisiana. Vicksburg and the Mississippi were shown by a cut of the apple that penetrated to its very core. Finally, when Mr. Botts had cut away more than half the apple, he said: "Now, Mr. Benjamin, when you can put the severed
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
rps: The General commanding announces with sorrow that the name of this corps has been stricken from the army rolls, and that he has been relieved from duty and ordered to report to Indianapolis, that his conduct in the late battles at Chickamauga may be investigated. The General commanding regrets the separation from his command, not the investigation. Investigation, the closest scrutiny, however if may affect him, can only brighten your fame. Your deeds at Chickamauga, as at Stone river, will hand down to posterity your honored names. You have honored me! The mighty hand of the Twenty-First Army Corps has graven the name of its commander on famous pages of the past. And the slanderer's tongue cannot revoke the past. Future honors await you. May God's blessings attend you! (Official.) T. L. Crittenden, Major Gen'l U. S. Vols. P. P. Oldershand, Capt. and A. A. G. Arrest of blockade runners from Norfolk — arrival there of Boone, the Castle Thunder Mu
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