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Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
th his cavalry division and a detachment of infantry, remained to hold our lines south of the Rapidan; Gen. Stuart, with Hampton's division, moved on the right of the column. With a portion of his command he attacked the advance of the enemy near Jhe cavalry of the latter advanced on the following day, and some skirmishing occurred at Buckland. General Stuart, with Hampton's division, retired slowly towards Warrenton, in order to draw the enemy in that direction, thus exposing his flank and he advance of the enemy at this point yesterday, in accordance with the suggestions of Major-General Lee, I retired with Hampton's division slowly before the enemy, until within two miles and a half of Warrenton, in order that Major-General Lee, comnity to attack the enemy in flank and rear. The plan proved successful. The enemy followed slowly and cautiously after Hampton's division, when, on hearing Major-General Lee's guns on their flank, I pressed upon them vigorously in front. They at
Haymarket (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
Stuart heard the sound of Lee's guns he turned upon the enemy, who, after a stubborn resistance broke and fled in confusion, pursued by General Stuart nearly to Haymarket, and by General Lee to Gainesville. Here the Federal infantry was encountered, and after capturing a number of them during the night the cavalry slowly retired le I, with the few men of Gordon's and Rosser's brigades who could be collected after our unusually long chase, moved around to our left and pressed down towards Haymarket. Here I encountered, besides a large cavalry force, the first army corps, who retired a short distance beyond Haymarket on the Carolina road. I attacked their Haymarket on the Carolina road. I attacked their infantry pickets by moonlight, and scattered them over the fields, capturing many. General Lee pressed down to within a short distance of Cainsville, when he encountered their infantry, and captured prisoners from the first army corps on that road also. The pursuit was continued until after dark. The cavalry force was commanded
Broad Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
cept him. General Hill arrived first at Bristol Station, where his advance, consisting of two brigades, became engaged with a force largely superior in numbers, posted behind the railroad embankment. The particulars of the action have not been officially reported, but the brigades were repulsed with some loss, and five pieces of artillery, with a number of prisoners captured. Before the rest of the troops could be brought up, and the position of the enemy ascertained, he retreated across Broad Run. The next morning he was reported to be fortifying beyond Bull Run, extending his line towards the Little River Turnpike. The vicinity of the entrenchments around Washington and Alexandria rendered it useless to turn his new position, as it was apparent that he could readily retire to them, and would decline an engagement unless attacked in his fortifications. A further advance was therefore deemed unnecessary, and after destroying the railroad from Cub Run southwardly to the Rappah
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
e fields, capturing many. General Lee pressed down to within a short distance of Cainsville, when he encountered their infantry, and captured prisoners from the first army corps on that road also. The pursuit was continued until after dark. The cavalry force was commanded by Kilpatrick, and composed of ten regiments. Most respectfully, (Signed,) J F B Stuart, Major General. Official: John Withers, Asst. Adj Gen. Headq'rs Valley District,in the Fork of the Shenandoah, Near Front Royal, Oct. 19, 1863. Col. R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, A. N. V. Colonel: Yesterday (Sunday) morning, at 2 o'clock, I moved from Berryville to surprise and capture the garrison at Charlestown. The surprise was complete, the enemy having no suspicion of our approach until I had the town entirely surrounded. I found the enemy occupying the Court-House, jail, and some contiguous buildings, in the heart of the town, all loop-holed for musketry, and the Court-House yard enclosed by a heavy
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
n body arrived near that place on the 11th inst., and discovered that the enemy had retreated towards the Rappahannock, ruing or destroying his stores. We were compelled to halt during the rest of the day to provision the troops, but the cavalry, under Gen. Stuart, continued to press the enemy's rear guard towards the Rappahannock.--A large force of Federal cavalry, in the meantime, had crossed the Rapidan after our movement be gun, but was repulsed by Gen. Fitz Lee, and pursued towards Brandy Station. Near that place the commands of Stuart and Lee united, on the afternoon of the 11th, and after a severe engagement drove the enemy's cavalry across the Rappahannock, with heavy loss. On the morning of the 12th, the army marched in two columns, with the design for aching the Orange and Alexandria railroad, north of the river, and interrupting the retreat of the enemy. After a skirmish with some of the Federal cavalry at Jeffersontown, we reached the Rappahannock at Warren
Buckland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
The cavalry of the latter advanced on the following day, and some skirmishing occurred at Buckland. General Stuart, with Hampton's division, retired slowly towards Warrenton, in order to draw tn, thus exposing his flank and rear to General Lee, who moved from Auburn and attacked him near Buckland. As soon as General Stuart heard the sound of Lee's guns he turned upon the enemy, who, after ly, your ob't serv't, R. E. Lee, General. Official: John Withers, A. A. General. Buckland, Va. Oct. 20th, 1863. General: After offering some considerable resistance to the advance oemy retreating in great confusion. Major-General Lee had attacked them in flank just below Buckland. We captured about 200 prisoners, 8 wagons and ambulances, arms, horses and equipments. The rout was the most complete that any cavalry has ever suffered during the war. Crossing at Buckland, General Fitz Lee pushed down the pike towards Gainesville, while I, with the few men of Gordon's
Auburn, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
he following day, and some skirmishing occurred at Buckland. General Stuart, with Hampton's division, retired slowly towards Warrenton, in order to draw the enemy in that direction, thus exposing his flank and rear to General Lee, who moved from Auburn and attacked him near Buckland. As soon as General Stuart heard the sound of Lee's guns he turned upon the enemy, who, after a stubborn resistance broke and fled in confusion, pursued by General Stuart nearly to Haymarket, and by General Lee to of the enemy at this point yesterday, in accordance with the suggestions of Major-General Lee, I retired with Hampton's division slowly before the enemy, until within two miles and a half of Warrenton, in order that Major-General Lee, coming from Auburn, might have an opportunity to attack the enemy in flank and rear. The plan proved successful. The enemy followed slowly and cautiously after Hampton's division, when, on hearing Major-General Lee's guns on their flank, I pressed upon them vigor
Greenwich (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
of infantry and a battery. Early next morning, 13th, the march was resumed, and the columns re-united at Warrenton in the afternoon, when another halt was made to supply the troops with provisions. The enemy fell back rapidly along the line of the railroad, and early on the 14th the pursuit was continued, a portion of the army moving by way of New Baltimore towards Bristol Station, and the rest, accompanied by the main body of the cavalry, proceeding to the same point by Auburn Mills and Greenwich. Near the former place a skirmish took place between Gen. Ewell's advance and the rear guard of the enemy, which was forced back and rapidly pursued. The retreat of the enemy was conducted by several direct parallel roads, while our troops were compelled to march by different and circuitous routes. We were consequently unable to intercept him. General Hill arrived first at Bristol Station, where his advance, consisting of two brigades, became engaged with a force largely superior in
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
dvance, consisting of two brigades, became engaged with a force largely superior in numbers, posted behind the railroad embankment. The particulars of the action have not been officially reported, but the brigades were repulsed with some loss, and five pieces of artillery, with a number of prisoners captured. Before the rest of the troops could be brought up, and the position of the enemy ascertained, he retreated across Broad Run. The next morning he was reported to be fortifying beyond Bull Run, extending his line towards the Little River Turnpike. The vicinity of the entrenchments around Washington and Alexandria rendered it useless to turn his new position, as it was apparent that he could readily retire to them, and would decline an engagement unless attacked in his fortifications. A further advance was therefore deemed unnecessary, and after destroying the railroad from Cub Run southwardly to the Rappahannock, the army returned on the 18th to the line of that river, leav
Jeffersontown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 8
by Gen. Fitz Lee, and pursued towards Brandy Station. Near that place the commands of Stuart and Lee united, on the afternoon of the 11th, and after a severe engagement drove the enemy's cavalry across the Rappahannock, with heavy loss. On the morning of the 12th, the army marched in two columns, with the design for aching the Orange and Alexandria railroad, north of the river, and interrupting the retreat of the enemy. After a skirmish with some of the Federal cavalry at Jeffersontown, we reached the Rappahannock at Warrenton Springs, in the afternoon where the passage of the river was disputed by cavalry and artillery. The enemy was quickly driven off by a detachment of our cavalry, aided by a small force of infantry and a battery. Early next morning, 13th, the march was resumed, and the columns re-united at Warrenton in the afternoon, when another halt was made to supply the troops with provisions. The enemy fell back rapidly along the line of the railroad, and e
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