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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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purpose. Knoxville, Oct. 30, (via Louisville, Nov. 1.)--Our forces which occupied London have retreated to the north side of the river, and now occupy the heights commanding London. The other dispositions of our troops remain unchanged. From the army of the Potomac. Furloughs for 15 days are being granted in the army of the Potomac. The cars on the railroad now run from Washington to the Three-Mile Station, and will soon go to Bealton. A dispatch from Washington, dated the 1st inst., says: We learn from the army of the Potomac that the principal movements of late have been changes of positions of the different corps. These changes have been the occasions of slight skirmishes, but without serious loss to either side. The guerillas continue their operations upon wagon trains and outposts with varied success. The impression prevailed at headquarters that Lee was disposed to fight and Meade's intentions was to accommodate him at the earliest opportunity.
Latest from the North. Through the courtesy of the officers of the Exchange Bureau we have received New York papers of Monday last, the 2d inst.: The capture of Lookout Mountain — Gallantry of the 11th and 12th corps--the rebels driven at the point of the bayonet. Under this heading the New York Tribune publishes the following official telegram from General Thomas: Chattanooga, Oct. 29, 1863. Maj-Gen. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: In the fight of last night the enemy attacked Gen. Geary's division, posted at Waxahachie, on three sides, and broke his camp at one point, but was driven back in most gallant style by part of his force, the remainder being held in reserve. Howard, while marching to Geary's relief, was attacked in the flank, the enemy occupying in force two commanding hills on the left of the road. He immediately threw forward two of his regiments and took both at the point of the bayonet, driving the enemy from his breastworks and across Loo
arle and Chesapeake Canal, had caused considerable uneasiness in Norfolk, and Gen. Potter, with a body-guard, had gone to the scene of the occurrence to inspect the ground. Business in the ship-yard at Portsmouth, Va., is very brisk, and there are five United States vessels there being repaired. The following is an extract from A letter from Norfolk. Col. Upham, of the 15th Connecticut regiment, with his own command and 500 cavalrymen in addition, left camp near Portsmouth on the 13th inst., and moved through the country in the direction of South Mills, raiding in fine style, but meeting with no force of the enemy en route. At the latter place a junction was made with a proportionate force from North Carolina, and thus strengthened the little army scouted and scoured the country far and near, with no mean success; for near Elizabeth City our men came unexpectedly upon a camp or lurking place of guerillas. The nest was broken up, several captures made, and those who escaped
Nearly all are wounded, and have lost either an arm or a leg. The propeller City of Richmond arrived here this morning from Washington, with F. A. Holbrook, the Commissioner of Vermont, who will take all the disabled Vermont soldiers from this place on the City of Richmond to New Haven, Conn., en route to the United States General Hospital at Brattleboro', Vermont. The intentions of the Confederates in Texas. The New Orleans correspondent of the New York Herald, writing on the 16th ult., gives the programme adopted by the "rebel" leaders in Texas and the trans-Mississippi districts. He says: The armies now commanded by Holmes, Price, and Parsons, in Arkansas; the forces of Smith, Hobart, and Taylor, in Northern and Central Louisiana; those of Greene, Straight, and Major, in the southern part of the State, and part of the troops of Magruder, in Texas, are to be concentrated at Niblett's Bluffs, on the Sabine river, which, together with the lake of the same name, form
The Iron rams. The Liverpool papers, of the 21st ult., contradict the report that a guard of marines had been put on board one of the rams in the Mersey to prevent her sailing. In the meantime the work on one of the rams, El Trousers, is being rapidly pushed forward, and no attempt is made to conceal the warlike character of the vessel. The Levant Herald, of Constantinople, confirms the report that the Turkish Government has offered to buy the rams. Two other members of the British Ministry, the Secretary of War and the Solicitor General, have made speeches on the American war. Both defended the course hitherto pursued by the Government and the continuance of strict neutrality.
han by the casualties of battle or campaign. The enemy is resolutely determined to hold Texas, for the possession of that State by us will put an end to the existence, as an aggregate, of their armies on the west side of the river. What Gen. Lee's movements mean. The Yankees are very much puzzled to know what Gen. Lee's movements mean, though we should think that Meade discovered them pretty plainly in that race to Washington. An army correspondent of the Herald writes on the 26th ult.: General Lee, it is ascertained, came across the river early Saturday morning, and remained a short time inspecting the situation. He then returned, and a short time afterwards the rebels advanced in strong force, variously estimated. I learn from reliable sources that the rebels are strongly fortifying themselves all along the banks of the Rappahannock, and have made quite a strong position of a fortification thrown up by the Union troops to serve to protect the pontoon bridges fo
road. He immediately threw forward two of his regiments and took both at the point of the bayonet, driving the enemy from his breastworks and across Lookout creek. In this brilliant success over their old adversary, the conduct of the officers and men of the 11th and 12th corps is entitled to the highest praise. Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General. The following dispatches relating to the subject are published: The Cincinnati Gazette has a dispatch from Chattanooga, dated the 27th inst., which says: "A detachment under Col. Stanley, of the 11th Ohio regiment, floated fifty pontoons down the river in the face of the rebel sharpshooters, landed at Brown's ferry, and surprised and drove the rebels from the ridge on the south side, opening communication with Bridgeport. "The rebels are flanked, and must evacuate Lookout Mountain." A second dispatch says that Gen. Hazen, with two thousand of Gen. Palmer's division, attacked the enemy on Lookout Mountain, and d
er has been assigned to the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. Iowa has given a majority of 25,000 for the Republican ticket. Of eighty two counties only fourteen give Democratic majorities. From Arkansas we learn that Gen. Marmaduke was at Arkadelphia with the cavalry of General Holmes's command. Dobbs, a notorious guerilla, had been captured. Col. Chas. R. Ellett, commanding the Mississippi marine brigade, died suddenly at Bunker Hill, Ill., on the 29th ult. D. K. Abel, editor of the St. Joseph's (Mo.) Tribune, has been arrested for publishing articles "defamatory" of the Abolition militia of that State. Major Mosby, the famous guerilla, dined in the Marshall House, at Alexandria, on September 30th, and then had the impudence to inform the public of the fact by placarding it in chalk on a dead wall in town over his own signature. The Chicago Tribune says: "We have an intimation that Gen. Halleck is shortly to be removed from the
September 30th (search for this): article 4
ajority of 25,000 for the Republican ticket. Of eighty two counties only fourteen give Democratic majorities. From Arkansas we learn that Gen. Marmaduke was at Arkadelphia with the cavalry of General Holmes's command. Dobbs, a notorious guerilla, had been captured. Col. Chas. R. Ellett, commanding the Mississippi marine brigade, died suddenly at Bunker Hill, Ill., on the 29th ult. D. K. Abel, editor of the St. Joseph's (Mo.) Tribune, has been arrested for publishing articles "defamatory" of the Abolition militia of that State. Major Mosby, the famous guerilla, dined in the Marshall House, at Alexandria, on September 30th, and then had the impudence to inform the public of the fact by placarding it in chalk on a dead wall in town over his own signature. The Chicago Tribune says: "We have an intimation that Gen. Halleck is shortly to be removed from the chief command of the armies of the United States. " Gold was quoted in New York on Saturday at 146½.
October 13th (search for this): article 6
dy had gone through and sent south. Among the Yankees passing here last Sunday were a number of the notorious Kansas jayhawker, who scruple not at the commission of any crime, however hideous. They came in town in advance of the main force, yelling like so many fiends. Galloping up to a squad of old men and boys assembled on the corner of the square, they with drawn pistols, curses and threats, sought to intimidate and frighten them; but failing to do so, went forward. Friday, October 13.--One of our cavalry arrived last night from the Tallahatchie, from whom I learned that no general engagement occurred at Byhalia, but simply an artillery running fight, as our forces were falling back. They reached the Tallahatchie river and crossed, dismounted, and formed a line of battle. The Yankees coming up, our troops engaged them, and finally drove them back, with a Yankee loss of twelve killed, left on the field, and one captain (a Kansas jayhawker) wounded and captured. Of the
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