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rs and theatrical managers are making money: They say that "the St. Nicholas actually clears one hundred thousand dollars a year. The Metropolitan is reported to clear one thousand eight hundred dollars a week; the Fifth Avenue, two thousand dollars; the La Farge, one thousand two hundred dollars; the La Farge, one thousand two hundred dollars; the Astor House, nine hundred dollars, and so on. The theatres, at the same time, are "gathering the soap" quite as handsomely in proportion. Wallack is said to have netted thirty thousand dollars the past season, and will do still better the coming one. Wheatley has made, and is making, I should judge, one thousand dollars net every week out of Niblo's Garden, despite his rent and gas bill of 25,000 a year. Jackson, of the Winter Garden, does not do so well, because that theatre has a peculiar policy of its own, and is subject at times to various parties — to stars, to debutantes,"c. Yet Jackson, gossip avers, confesses to a profit of
sand dollars a year. The Metropolitan is reported to clear one thousand eight hundred dollars a week; the Fifth Avenue, two thousand dollars; the La Farge, one thousand two hundred dollars; the La Farge, one thousand two hundred dollars; the Astor House, nine hundred dollars, and so on. The theatres, at the same time, are "gathering the soap" quite as handsomely in proportion. Wallack is said to have netted thirty thousand dollars the past season, and will do still better the coming one. Wheatley has made, and is making, I should judge, one thousand dollars net every week out of Niblo's Garden, despite his rent and gas bill of 25,000 a year. Jackson, of the Winter Garden, does not do so well, because that theatre has a peculiar policy of its own, and is subject at times to various parties — to stars, to debutantes,"c. Yet Jackson, gossip avers, confesses to a profit of $10,000 per annum. Lingard, of the New Bowery, was on the verge of financial ruin a year ago. He had to desperate
d thirty thousand dollars the past season, and will do still better the coming one. Wheatley has made, and is making, I should judge, one thousand dollars net every week out of Niblo's Garden, despite his rent and gas bill of 25,000 a year. Jackson, of the Winter Garden, does not do so well, because that theatre has a peculiar policy of its own, and is subject at times to various parties — to stars, to debutantes,"c. Yet Jackson, gossip avers, confesses to a profit of $10,000 per annum. Lingard, of the New Bowery, was on the verge of financial ruin a year ago. He had to desperately struggle to keep his head above water. Now he is ahead of the world, but a notable bank account can give his check for thousands, and is clearing $30,000 a year. Fox, of the Old Bowery, was in just as awkward a dilemma last year. He, too, bravely buffeted the waves of misfortune, and, voila! he is now what the politicians here call "hunk, and is investing at least $50,000 a year; and so of the rest.
tted thirty thousand dollars the past season, and will do still better the coming one. Wheatley has made, and is making, I should judge, one thousand dollars net every week out of Niblo's Garden, despite his rent and gas bill of 25,000 a year. Jackson, of the Winter Garden, does not do so well, because that theatre has a peculiar policy of its own, and is subject at times to various parties — to stars, to debutantes,"c. Yet Jackson, gossip avers, confesses to a profit of $10,000 per annum. LJackson, gossip avers, confesses to a profit of $10,000 per annum. Lingard, of the New Bowery, was on the verge of financial ruin a year ago. He had to desperately struggle to keep his head above water. Now he is ahead of the world, but a notable bank account can give his check for thousands, and is clearing $30,000 a year. Fox, of the Old Bowery, was in just as awkward a dilemma last year. He, too, bravely buffeted the waves of misfortune, and, voila! he is now what the politicians here call "hunk, and is investing at least $50,000 a year; and so of the res