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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 6
rabands have been exchanged for cotton. A Massachusetts Republican paper relates, in the following language, an instance of the sale of a mulatto boy for a pig: "A few days ago we were at a place where a pretty colored lad, about fifteen years old and almost white, was busying himself. One man asked, 'Whose negro is that?' 'He belongs to such a man,' was the reply. 'Where did he come from? ''A member of — regiment gave him to — for a pig, that was worth five dollars.' Such talk in Massachusetts sounds badly, but we have reason to believe that it was literally true." Officers in the army, after having enticed negroes from their Southern homes, and kept them in camp until they have found them incident and worthless, have taken or sent them North, and turned them adrift to starve or beg. Abundant cases of this kind have occurred. Some of the Northern cities are overrun with "freedmen."--Many, perhaps, are disposed to work, but such are kept in the same menial condition as wh
Some curious Developments of how the Yankees Dispose of their contrabands. --The St. Louis Republican(Abolition) contains some rich exposures of what the Yankees do with the negroes who fall into their hands out West. The article must read well in Boston, where the man and brother elevateth his horn to the utmost. We make an extract from it: It is not true philanthropy which has inspired the Abolitionists in their course with regard to the Southern negroes. With them the question has been, not how many slaves would be benefited by abolition, but how much it would irritate and harass the slaveholders and contribute to the gratification of a sectional malice. During the present war thousands of negroes have been released from servitude to their masters, but we say unhesitatingly that in nine cases out of ten, if not in a far greater ratio, the change has been positively injurious to their condition, morally and physically. How many of the contrabands are better provided f
t white, was busying himself. One man asked, 'Whose negro is that?' 'He belongs to such a man,' was the reply. 'Where did he come from? ''A member of — regiment gave him to — for a pig, that was worth five dollars.' Such talk in Massachusetts sounds badly, but we have reason to believe that it was literally true." Officers in the army, after having enticed negroes from their Southern homes, and kept them in camp until they have found them incident and worthless, have taken or sent them North, and turned them adrift to starve or beg. Abundant cases of this kind have occurred. Some of the Northern cities are overrun with "freedmen."--Many, perhaps, are disposed to work, but such are kept in the same menial condition as when they were slaves, and few of them are so well treated, fed, or clothed. Few receive wages like other hired laborers. If they get sick they are shifted off upon the corporations. If they break the laws, to do which they are so tempted, jail doors fly open to