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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Eastport (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 5
ance. To confirm them in the opinion that we were coming by that way, Osterhaus's division was thrown forward to within a few miles of the place, and was suddenly withdrawn, leaving the impression with the enemy that their array of strength had frightened us back. But while they were securely and comfortably awaiting our approach, the time was occupied by Gen. Sherman in moving the bulk of his forces across the Tennessee river, which was accomplished easily and rapidly several days ago at Eastport, where two United States gunboats are lying, without opposition. A formidable army, commanded by one of our most energetic and accomplished Generals, is thus well on its ways towards its destination — Supplies for this army have not passed through Corinth for a week past, but have been obtained by the way of the Tennessee river, which is rapidly rising, and which will be our entire dependence for supplies for some time to come. It is thought the Memphis and Charleston Railroad will be
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
last night. The Gazette's special dispatch from Columbus says that a large force of infantry and two batteries of artillery were sent there yesterday. Gen. Cox left Columbus for Sandusky on a special train last night. The Fighting in Western Virginia. The following are the official telegrams received in Washington about the recent expedition of Averill and Scammell into Western Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forWestern Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forces at Mill Point, Pocahontas county, on the 5th inst., and drove him from his position with trifling loss.--Jackson fell back to the summit of Droop Mountain, when he was reinforced by Gen. Echols with Patten's brigade and one regiment from Jenkins's command. The position is naturally a strong one, and was strengthened by breastworks commanding the road. Gen. Averill turned the enemy's left with his infantry, and attacked him in front with cavalry, dismounted. The victory was decisive, a
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 5
he Mayor has taken measures to guard against incendiaries. He is also in communication with Gov. Seymour in relation to military affairs. Cincinnati, Nov. 13.--No additional intelligence relative to the Johnson's Island affair beyond that already telegraphed has been received. All was quiet in that vicinity last night. The Gazette's special dispatch from Columbus says that a large force of infantry and two batteries of artillery were sent there yesterday. Gen. Cox left Columbus for Sandusky on a special train last night. The Fighting in Western Virginia. The following are the official telegrams received in Washington about the recent expedition of Averill and Scammell into Western Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forces at Mill Point, Pocahontas county, on the 5th inst., and drove him from his position with trifling loss.--Jackson fell back to the summit of Droop Mountain, when he was reinforced b
Ogdensburg (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
r and upwards guarding our communications, to make an exchange which must result infinitely to our benefit. The river is much surer than railroad communications can be, besides being capable of transferring larger amounts of supplies. A plot to release the Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island--Lord Lyons Exposes it. The Yankee public has been startled by the exposure of a plot in Canada to release the 2,000 Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, and to burn Ogdensburg and Buffalo. --The conspiracy was exposed in a letter from Lord Lyons. The following dispatch has been received from the U. S. Secretary of War by the Mayor of Buffalo: Washington, Midnight, Nov. 11. To the Mayor of Buffalo: The British Minister, Lord Lyons, has to-night officially notified the Government that, from telegraphic information received from the Governor-General of Canada, there is reason to believe there is a plot on foot by persons who have found asylum in Cana
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): article 5
suspicion by the number or character of persons on board, shall be arrested. You will please acknowledge the receipt of this dispatch, and communicate to this Department any information you may now or hereafter have on this subject. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. The Baltimore American says that the number of rebel prisoners on Johnson's Island is over two thousand, nearly all of them officers, and that, in view of an apprehended attempt to escape, the gunboat Michigan not improbable that the transports were to be furnished by their sympathizing friends. The following dispatches show that measures have been taken to stop the matter: Buffalo, Nov. 13.--Mayor Fargo has received a second dispatch from Secretary Stanton stating that Major-Gen. Dix had been ordered to Buffalo to adopt measures for the security of the frontier against the plotting of the traitors who have taken refuge in the British provinces. The Mayor has taken measures to guard against i
n the British provinces. The Mayor has taken measures to guard against incendiaries. He is also in communication with Gov. Seymour in relation to military affairs. Cincinnati, Nov. 13.--No additional intelligence relative to the Johnson's Island affair beyond that already telegraphed has been received. All was quiet in that vicinity last night. The Gazette's special dispatch from Columbus says that a large force of infantry and two batteries of artillery were sent there yesterday. Gen. Cox left Columbus for Sandusky on a special train last night. The Fighting in Western Virginia. The following are the official telegrams received in Washington about the recent expedition of Averill and Scammell into Western Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forces at Mill Point, Pocahontas county, on the 5th inst., and drove him from his position with trifling loss.--Jackson fell back to the summit of Droop Mountai
Lyons Exposes (search for this): article 5
allowed to take the field. The Tennessee river forming a sure avenue of supplies, and requiring only a few gunboats to keep it open, will thus allow our troops, who have been for a year and upwards guarding our communications, to make an exchange which must result infinitely to our benefit. The river is much surer than railroad communications can be, besides being capable of transferring larger amounts of supplies. A plot to release the Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island--Lord Lyons Exposes it. The Yankee public has been startled by the exposure of a plot in Canada to release the 2,000 Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, and to burn Ogdensburg and Buffalo. --The conspiracy was exposed in a letter from Lord Lyons. The following dispatch has been received from the U. S. Secretary of War by the Mayor of Buffalo: Washington, Midnight, Nov. 11. To the Mayor of Buffalo: The British Minister, Lord Lyons, has to-night officially notified the
roops in response to the last call of the President, and a bill was introduced proposing to pay all recruits twenty dollars per month from the State Treasury in lieu of bounties. Gen. Meade's official report of the Gettysburg battle sums up the result of the Pennsylvania campaign as follows: "Union losses in the engagements of July 1st, 2d, and 3d--killed, 2834; wounded, 13,709; missing. 6,643; total, 23, 186. Three guns, 41 standards, and 13,621 prisoners fell into our hands." Judge Lowrie, of Philadelphia, has given a decision against the constitutionality of the draft. It won't do any good, however, as there is not any habeas corpus now. Bogus Union meetings are being held in Little Rock, Ask. The Evening Transcript, a paper started in Baltimore two weeks ago, by Wm. H. Wilson, one of the former proprietors of the Gazette, has been suppressed by Gen. Schenck. The fight at Rappahannock Station seems to have been considered by the Yankees as a regular battle
B. F. Kelley (search for this): article 5
ng in every direction. The cavalry pursued till dark, capturing many prisoners and a large quantity of arms, ammunition, &c. The enemy's wounded have all fallen into our hands. Our loss in killed and wounded is about one hundred. B. F. Kelley, Brig. Gen'l. Clarksburg, Nov. 8, 1863. To Governor Boreman: A telegram has just been received from Gen. Scammon, in which he says: "Gen. Duffie entered Lewisburg at half-past 10 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, the enemy having passedm a severe whipping at Droop Mountain on the 6th." Duffie captured the enemy's camp, tents, knapsacks, provisions, &c, one caisson, and upwards of one hundred head of cattle. The cavalry have gone in pursuit. Averill has arrived. B F Kelley, Brig. Gen. The affair at Rogersville — Richardson in Tennessee. The Baltimore American, of the 13th, referring to the Federal disaster at Rogersville, Tennessee, says: It was reported a few days since that two of General Burnside'
ce relative to the Johnson's Island affair beyond that already telegraphed has been received. All was quiet in that vicinity last night. The Gazette's special dispatch from Columbus says that a large force of infantry and two batteries of artillery were sent there yesterday. Gen. Cox left Columbus for Sandusky on a special train last night. The Fighting in Western Virginia. The following are the official telegrams received in Washington about the recent expedition of Averill and Scammell into Western Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forces at Mill Point, Pocahontas county, on the 5th inst., and drove him from his position with trifling loss.--Jackson fell back to the summit of Droop Mountain, when he was reinforced by Gen. Echols with Patten's brigade and one regiment from Jenkins's command. The position is naturally a strong one, and was strengthened by breastworks commanding the road. Gen. Averill t
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