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h, dated the 9th says Blunt is in a bad way. It adds: "Advices from Fort Scott say that a courier arrived there on Friday night from General Blunt, bringing information that the rebels, under Cooper and Shelby, eluded our forces, crossed the Arkansas river with 9,000 men, and were marching on Blunt, who has 1,800 cavalry as an escort to an immense supply train for Fort Smith. Gen Blunt had curtailed his train and made preparations for defences." Lehigh coal sold in Philadelphia on Monday last at $11.20 per ton of 2,240 pounds--a figure never before attained in that city. Gold was quoted in New York Thursday at 146½. Secretary Seward, in a speech at Auburn, N. Y., last week, said that "it is injustice, and downright robbery of Abraham Lincoln to refuse him the full enjoyment of the authority conferred upon him" in the election of 1860, and that "there can be no peace and quiet until Abraham Lincoln is President, under that election, of the whole United States."
Later from the North. We have received New York papers of Friday, the 13th inst., through the courtesy of the officers of the Exchange Bureau, and make up the following brief summary of the news they contain, which is not important: Operations of Meade's army. There is no news from Meade's army, which, it is said, is confronting Lee's army, which is said to be this side of the Rapidan. Only a few of Stuart's cavalry are beyond the Rapidan. The Philadelphia Inquirer says: On Monday Kilpatrick's cavalry was at Pony Mountain, only a mile or two southeast of Culpeper, and on Monday night he saw no fires there, but large and extended fires sent up their lurid glare south of the Rapidan, from Raccoon Ford, which is east of the railroad, to Rapidan Station, on the railroad. Meade's duty, of which he is fully aware, is to keep close to him, never letting him get fairly away, but always manœuvring for a good battle-field. This, we are glad to know, is Meade's forte, as h
e contending forces now that any reconnaissance of a positive character may lead to it at a moment's notice. The situation at Chattanooga and the Southwest--a Big blow to be struck. The Yankees have news from Chattanooga as late as the 12th inst. An artillery duel between the batteries on Lookout Mountain and Moccasin Point is the only thing like news. They say that Gen. Lee has taken Bragg's army; that Gen. Hardee has been assigned to Gen. Polk's corps, and relieved General Longstreet and pastor of a negro church in Washington, has been appointed Chaplain of the 1st South Carolina United States colored troops. Gen. Butler has arrived at Fortress Monroe with his staff. The balloting in the Missouri Legislature, on the 12th, for U. S. Senator, stood: Brown 62, Phelps 30, Brodhead 39--no choice. An exchange of surgeons has been agreed upon between the United States and Confederate Commissioners. The Massachusetts Legislature met in extra session on the 11th
November 8th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 5
Sandusky on a special train last night. The Fighting in Western Virginia. The following are the official telegrams received in Washington about the recent expedition of Averill and Scammell into Western Virginia: Clarksburg, November 8, 1863 To Governor Boreman: Gen. Averill attacked Jackson's forces at Mill Point, Pocahontas county, on the 5th inst., and drove him from his position with trifling loss.--Jackson fell back to the summit of Droop Mountain, when he was reinfor till dark, capturing many prisoners and a large quantity of arms, ammunition, &c. The enemy's wounded have all fallen into our hands. Our loss in killed and wounded is about one hundred. B. F. Kelley, Brig. Gen'l. Clarksburg, Nov. 8, 1863. To Governor Boreman: A telegram has just been received from Gen. Scammon, in which he says: "Gen. Duffie entered Lewisburg at half-past 10 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, the enemy having passed through in retreat from Averill, who gave him a
November 11th (search for this): article 5
arger amounts of supplies. A plot to release the Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island--Lord Lyons Exposes it. The Yankee public has been startled by the exposure of a plot in Canada to release the 2,000 Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, and to burn Ogdensburg and Buffalo. --The conspiracy was exposed in a letter from Lord Lyons. The following dispatch has been received from the U. S. Secretary of War by the Mayor of Buffalo: Washington, Midnight, Nov. 11. To the Mayor of Buffalo: The British Minister, Lord Lyons, has to-night officially notified the Government that, from telegraphic information received from the Governor-General of Canada, there is reason to believe there is a plot on foot by persons who have found asylum in Canada, to invade the United States and destroy the city of Buffalo; that they propose to take possession of some steamboats on Lake Erie, to surprise Johnson's Island, free the prisoners of war confined there, a
way their arms and scattering in every direction. The cavalry pursued till dark, capturing many prisoners and a large quantity of arms, ammunition, &c. The enemy's wounded have all fallen into our hands. Our loss in killed and wounded is about one hundred. B. F. Kelley, Brig. Gen'l. Clarksburg, Nov. 8, 1863. To Governor Boreman: A telegram has just been received from Gen. Scammon, in which he says: "Gen. Duffie entered Lewisburg at half-past 10 o'clock A. M. on the 7th, the enemy having passed through in retreat from Averill, who gave him a severe whipping at Droop Mountain on the 6th." Duffie captured the enemy's camp, tents, knapsacks, provisions, &c, one caisson, and upwards of one hundred head of cattle. The cavalry have gone in pursuit. Averill has arrived. B F Kelley, Brig. Gen. The affair at Rogersville — Richardson in Tennessee. The Baltimore American, of the 13th, referring to the Federal disaster at Rogersville, Tennessee, sa
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