hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Thomas 22 2 Browse Search
Kate Chase 19 5 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 14 0 Browse Search
Rosecrans 14 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 13 1 Browse Search
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
John K. Berry 10 0 Browse Search
Goldman Bryson 8 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 8 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 511 total hits in 245 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
the troops of that corps, supported by Doubleday's division and Stannard's brigade, of the 1st corps. During this assault both Major-General Hancock, commanding the left centre, and Brigadier-General Gibson, commanding the 2d corps, were severely wounded. This terminated the battle, the enemy retching to his lines, leaving the field strewed with his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburg, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the 29th, 30th, and 1st, had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was on the 3d sent on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburg road, where good service was rendered in assaulting the enemy's line and occupying his attention. The result of the campaign may be briefly stated, in the defeat of the enemy at Gettysburg, their compulsory evacuation of Pennsylvanian and Maryland, and
all corps to concentrate at Gettysburg, directing all trains to be sent to the rear at Westminster, at 11 P. M. first. Broke up my headquarters, which till then had been at Taneytown, and proceeded to the field, arriving there at 1 A. M. of the second. So soon as it was light I proceeded to inspect the position and to make arrangements for posting several corps as they should reach the ground. By 7 A. M. the Second and Fifth corps, with the rest of the Third, had reached the ground, and wereis terminated the battle, the enemy retching to his lines, leaving the field strewed with his dead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburg, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the 29th, 30th, and 1st, had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was on the 3d sent on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburg road, where good service wa
ir absence the line on the extreme right was held by a very much reduced force. This was taken advantage of by the enemy, who, during the absence of Geary's division of the 12th corps, advanced and occupied part of the line. On the morning of the 3d, Gen. Geary, having returned during the night, attacked at early dawn the enemy, and succeeded in driving him back and reoccupying his former position. A spirited contest was maintained all the morning along this part of the line. Gen. Geary, reinforced by Wheaton's brigade, of the 6th corps, maintained his position and inflicted very severe losses on the enemy. With this exception our lines remained undisturbed till 1 P.M. on the 3d, when the enemy opened from 125 guns, playing upon our centre and left. This cannonade continued for over two hour., when, our guns failing to make any reply, the enemy ceased firing, and soon his masses of infantry became visible, forming for an assault on our left and left centre. An assault was ma
Latest from the North. The Baltimore Gazette, of the 14th instant, has been received. It contains very little of interest. A telegram from Washington states that a considerable body of Confederates shelled Gen. Kilpatrick's camp, near Stevensburg, on Thursday last, from which fact it is argued that at least some rebels remained on the north side of the Rapidan. The New Orleans Era, of the 4th, states that the Confederates attacked Washburn's advance on the 3d inst, driving it towards the main body. The Confederates were soon checked, it is said, and in turn were driven back, with the loss of 200 prisoners. The Federal loss was forty killed. The New Orleans correspondent of the New York Express says that the Federal forces had fallen back to New Iberia. Gold in New York at the second board on Friday was quoted at 147 3-8--an advance.
Assault and battery. --Ash Levy and M. A. Levy were brought before the Mayor yesterday, charged with assaulting and beating John K. Berry, on the 14th inst. In the course of this examination the two Levys made a counter charge against Berry and another man named R. M. Harvey, who, they alleged, had assaulted them, (the Levys,) and fired a pistol at them. The testimony in this case proved that Berry had rented from Ash Levy a certain tenement, about which some dissatisfaction had occurred, causing the owner of the house to be very annoying to Berry, which resulted in a difficulty between them. The Mayor, after a patient hearing of the witnesses, deemed both Ash Levy and J. K. Berry to blame, and required of them security in the sum of $500 to keep the peace for twelve months. Against Harvey there was not a particle of evidence, and he was therefore discharged.
From Kentucky. Abingdon, Nov. 16. --Persons from Kentucky report the execution of Lieut. Harvey C. Conner, of Col. Adam Johnson's regiment, by the Yankees, at Mount Sterling, on the 25th ult. Ten Kentucky cavalry regiments have been mustered out of service, and a draft made on each county for a company by Gov. Bramlette.
The London times on Confederate military movements. --The London Times, of the 26th ult., has an editorial on the late military operations of the Confederate commanders, resulting in the defeat of Rosecrans and the retreat of Meade. It says: In these last operations in Tennessee and Virginia the Confederate commanders have displayed a degree of military skill and a power of combining their force that the Federals have never been able to attain. The armies of General Lee and General Bragg, in Georgia and Northern Virginia, were more than four hundred miles apart in a straight line. Yet they cooperated with and supported each other with as much celeray as if they were engaged in one operation. A whole corps has been taken from one and added to the other with facility as great as if the main bodies had only been separated by the distance of a day's march. The immense advantage of railroads for the purposes of war has never yet been so signally proved as by the transfer o
t Harper's Ferry, to move with seven thousand men to occupy Frederick and the line of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, with the balance of his forces, estimated at four thou-thousand, to remove and escort public property to Washington. On the 29th the army was put in motion, and on the evening of that day it was in position, the left at Emmetsburg, and the right at New Windsor. Buford's division of cavalry was on the left flank, with his advance at Gettysburg. Kilpatrick's division was indead and wounded, and numerous prisoners in our hands. Buford's division of cavalry, after its arduous service at Gettysburg, on the first, was, on the second, sent to Westminster to refit and guard our trains. Kilpatrick's division, that on the 29th, 30th, and 1st, had been successfully engaging the enemy's cavalry, was on the 3d sent on our extreme left, on the Emmetsburg road, where good service was rendered in assaulting the enemy's line and occupying his attention. The result of the
rg, and the right at New Windsor. Buford's division of cavalry was on the left flank, with his advance at Gettysburg. Kilpatrick's division was in the front at Hanover, where he encountered Gen. Stuart's Confederate cavalry, which had crossed the Potomac at Seneca Creek, and passing our right flank, was making its way towards Carlisle, having escaped Gregg's division, which was delayed in taking position on the right flank, by the occupation of the reads by a column of infantry. On the 30th the right flank of the army was moved up to Manchester, the left still being at Emmetsburg, or in that vicinity, at which place three corps, First, Eleventh, and Third, were collected under the orders of Major-General Reynolds. General Butord having reported from Gettysburg the appearance of the enemy on the Cashtown road in some force, General Reynolds was directed to occupy Gettysburg. On reaching that place, on the 1st day of July, General Reynolds found Buford's cavalry warmly engaged wi
June 28th (search for this): article 4
, and to-day publish, as a very interesting matter of history, his report. He says: The Confederate army, which was commanded by Gen. R. E. Lee. was estimated at over one hundred thousand strong. All that army had crossed the Potomac river and advanced up the Cumberland Valley. Reliable intelligence placed his advance thus:--Ewell's corps on the Susquehanna, Harrisburg, and Columbia. Longstreet's corps at Chambersburg, and Hill's corps between that place and Cashtown. The 28th of June was spent in ascertaining the positions and strength of the different corps of the army, but principally in bringing up the cavalry which had been covering the rear of the army in its passage over the Potomac, and to which a large increase had just been made from the force previously attached to the defences of Washington. --Orders were given on this day to Major-General French, commanding at Harper's Ferry, to move with seven thousand men to occupy Frederick and the line of the Baltimore
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...