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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Reported fighting on the Rapidan — the enemy said to be Crossing. By passengers who came down on the Fredericksburg train yesterday afternoon we learn that heavy firing was heard at Hamilton's Crossing, in the direction of the upper fords of the Rappahannock. Passengers by the Central train, which arrived at a late hour, state that a report reached Orange C. H. yesterday morning that the enemy had crossed the Rapidan at one or two fords during the night before, and that heavy skirmishing was going on all the morning. Whether the enemy had crossed in force, or whether they consisted of infantry or cavalry, or both, we could not learn. From movement of our own troops, we think it more than likely that a general advance of the enemy is contemplated. It will be seen that the correspondent of the Dispatch, writing from the army, announces an advance of Meade's pickets.
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Reported fighting on the Rapidan — the enemy said to be Crossing. By passengers who came down on the Fredericksburg train yesterday afternoon we learn that heavy firing was heard at Hamilton's Crossing, in the direction of the upper fords of the Rappahannock. Passengers by the Central train, which arrived at a late hour, state that a report reached Orange C. H. yesterday morning that the enemy had crossed the Rapidan at one or two fords during the night before, and that heavy skirmishing was going on all the morning. Whether the enemy had crossed in force, or whether they consisted of infantry or cavalry, or both, we could not learn. From movement of our own troops, we think it more than likely that a general advance of the enemy is contemplated. It will be seen that the correspondent of the Dispatch, writing from the army, announces an advance of Meade's pickets.
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Reported fighting on the Rapidan — the enemy said to be Crossing. By passengers who came down on the Fredericksburg train yesterday afternoon we learn that heavy firing was heard at Hamilton's Crossing, in the direction of the upper fords of the Rappahannock. Passengers by the Central train, which arrived at a late hour, state that a report reached Orange C. H. yesterday morning that the enemy had crossed the Rapidan at one or two fords during the night before, and that heavy skirmishing was going on all the morning. Whether the enemy had crossed in force, or whether they consisted of infantry or cavalry, or both, we could not learn. From movement of our own troops, we think it more than likely that a general advance of the enemy is contemplated. It will be seen that the correspondent of the Dispatch, writing from the army, announces an advance of Meade's pickets.
The reported surrender of Burnside. The reports from East Tennessee are very cheering, "if true," They state that Gen. Longstreet attacked Burnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday mBurnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday morning the attack was about to be renewed, when Burnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are coBurnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by reliable gentlemen. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten
Longstreet (search for this): article 2
The reported surrender of Burnside. The reports from East Tennessee are very cheering, "if true," They state that Gen. Longstreet attacked Burnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday morning the attack was about to be renewed, when Burnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally heir arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by reliable gentlemen. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten, losing largely in killed and wounded, besides 700 prisoners, 900 horses, 110 wagons, four
Station West (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
des, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by reliable gentlemen. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten, losing largely in killed and wounded, besides 700 prisoners, 900 horses, 110 wagons, four pieces of artillery, 3,700 blankets, and considerable amounts of commissary and quartermaster's stores, small arms, and ammunition. They fell back towards Knoxville, hotly pursued by our troops, and it was in the retreat that they lost the prisoners and property enumerated above. Our own loss the writer estimates at 150 killed and wou
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
The reported surrender of Burnside. The reports from East Tennessee are very cheering, "if true," They state that Gen. Longstreet attacked Burnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday morning the attack was about to be renewed, when Burnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by reliable gentlemen. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten, lo
Deaths at Johnson's Island. One of the returned Confederate surgeons has courteously handed us the following list of deaths of Confederate officers who have died in the Federal prison at Johnson's Island since July 20th: Lt Col. A P Hamilton, 1st Miss; Capts G W Fuller, (commander of gunboat,) S C; D C Webb, 1st Ala cavalry; J W Mullins, 1st Miss batt; C Gillespie, 65th N C; C M Tugle, 33d Ga; J M D King, 9th Ga; F M Ezell, 13th Tenn; A E Upchurch, 55th N C; J D Hardy, 18th Arkansas; S W Henry, 9th Tennessee cavalry; J C Peden, regiment unknown.--Lieutenants W J Hudson, 2d N C batt'n; W A Harvin, 51st Ga; Jno Hufsetter, 1st Ark batt'n; J M Musselman, 14th La; M Lyon, 45th N C; J M D Stevenson,15th Ark; S R Graham, 3d Texas cav; W P Harden, 5th N C; L B Williams, 63d N C; J M Dodson, 10th Tenn; E A M Orr, 62d N C; J B Gash, do; J Barnett, 9th La; J Smith Ray, 38th N C.--Privates Andrew Worthington, of Marshall, Ky; G M Cummings, Va; R D Copass, 60th Tenn; D C Jackson, 12th Va
Deaths at Johnson's Island. One of the returned Confederate surgeons has courteously handed us the following list of deaths of Confederate officers who have died in the Federal prison at Johnson's Island since July 20th: Lt Col. A P Hamilton, 1st Miss; Capts G W Fuller, (commander of gunboat,) S C; D C Webb, 1st Ala cavalry; J W Mullins, 1st Miss batt; C Gillespie, 65th N C; C M Tugle, 33d Ga; J M D King, 9th Ga; F M Ezell, 13th Tenn; A E Upchurch, 55th N C; J D Hardy, 18th Arkansas; S W Henry, 9th Tennessee cavalry; J C Peden, regiment unknown.--Lieutenants W J Hudson, 2d N C batt'n; W A Harvin, 51st Ga; Jno Hufsetter, 1st Ark batt'n; J M Musselman, 14th La; M Lyon, 45th N C; J M D Stevenson,15th Ark; S R Graham, 3d Texas cav; W P Harden, 5th N C; L B Williams, 63d N C; J M Dodson, 10th Tenn; E A M Orr, 62d N C; J B Gash, do; J Barnett, 9th La; J Smith Ray, 38th N C.--Privates Andrew Worthington, of Marshall, Ky; G M Cummings, Va; R D Copass, 60th Tenn; D C Jackson, 12th Va
st Ga; Jno Hufsetter, 1st Ark batt'n; J M Musselman, 14th La; M Lyon, 45th N C; J M D Stevenson,15th Ark; S R Graham, 3d Texas cav; W P Harden, 5th N C; L B Williams, 63d N C; J M Dodson, 10th Tenn; E A M Orr, 62d N C; J B Gash, do; J Barnett, 9th La; J Smith Ray, 38th N C.--Privates Andrew Worthington, of Marshall, Ky; G M Cummings, Va; R D Copass, 60th Tenn; D C Jackson, 12th Va; H D Talbert, Marshall, Ky; D D Kelley, 2d Tenn cav; Daniel Rockerham, 5th Ky; S H Everman, 7th Ky; Robert Holt, 16th Tenn; Hugh Goble, 5th Ky; A P Allen, 2d Ky; Jno Kenny, Va. Captain King and Lieutenant Graham died of wounds, the others of disease. Lieut. Ray died of smallpox, which disease had broken out on the island. J. Emmett Seruggs, of Warrenton, Va., and formerly editor of the Warrenton Whig, who was a citizen prisoner on the island, died on the 9th inst. of dysentery. He will be recollected as a prominent speaker on the Whig side in several of the Presidential campaigns of other days.
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