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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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Matters in Northern Virginia. There was no news received yesterday from Northern Virginia. A report was circulated during the day that a fleet of Yankee transports were in the Potomac, and that Gen. Meade had gone to Washington to consult with reference to the transfer of the Yankee army of the Potomac from the line of the Rappahannock to the Peninsula or South side. This report doubtless has its origin in the appearance of the Russian fleet, which was recently at New York, in the waters of the Potomac. This fleet is understood to be moving up that stream with a view of paying a visit to the capital of the Abolition Government.
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Matters in Northern Virginia. There was no news received yesterday from Northern Virginia. A report was circulated during the day that a fleet of Yankee transports were in the Potomac, and that Gen. Meade had gone to Washington to consult with reference to the transfer of the Yankee army of the Potomac from the line of the Rappahannock to the Peninsula or South side. This report doubtless has its origin in the appearance of the Russian fleet, which was recently at New York, in the waters of the Potomac. This fleet is understood to be moving up that stream with a view of paying a visit to the capital of the Abolition Government.
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Matters in Northern Virginia. There was no news received yesterday from Northern Virginia. A report was circulated during the day that a fleet of Yankee transports were in the Potomac, and that Gen. Meade had gone to Washington to consult with reference to the transfer of the Yankee army of the Potomac from the line of the Rappahannock to the Peninsula or South side. This report doubtless has its origin in the appearance of the Russian fleet, which was recently at New York, in the waterNorthern Virginia. A report was circulated during the day that a fleet of Yankee transports were in the Potomac, and that Gen. Meade had gone to Washington to consult with reference to the transfer of the Yankee army of the Potomac from the line of the Rappahannock to the Peninsula or South side. This report doubtless has its origin in the appearance of the Russian fleet, which was recently at New York, in the waters of the Potomac. This fleet is understood to be moving up that stream with a view of paying a visit to the capital of the Abolition Government.
es, leaving their helpless families without provisions or servants. Most of the negroes within the Yankee lines went off with them. Major Lacy's were saved by his overseer's activity in moving them off before the Yankees reached the Wilderness. Kilpatrick's cavalry distinguished themselves in robbing the negro houses as clean a their masters', not a vestige of clothing was left anywhere. Their courage was shown in knocking down the lame and aged Capt. Green, who told them they were such brave men that if he had a thousand such he could storm Gibraltar. Let our cavalry remember the gallant Kilpatrick and his men, and their conduct in Gloucester, Middlesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he will get a fight out of them before next May, when their term of service expires.
Kilpatrick (search for this): article 2
hing and bed linen from every house. The feather beds were emptied out in the yard, and the venerable Capt. Green and his children were reduced to sleeping between two mattresses Mr. John Spottswood and Capt. Beale were taken off by the Yankees, leaving their helpless families without provisions or servants. Most of the negroes within the Yankee lines went off with them. Major Lacy's were saved by his overseer's activity in moving them off before the Yankees reached the Wilderness. Kilpatrick's cavalry distinguished themselves in robbing the negro houses as clean a their masters', not a vestige of clothing was left anywhere. Their courage was shown in knocking down the lame and aged Capt. Green, who told them they were such brave men that if he had a thousand such he could storm Gibraltar. Let our cavalry remember the gallant Kilpatrick and his men, and their conduct in Gloucester, Middlesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade ga
Ravages of the enemy when last this side of the Rapidan. After Meade's army had crossed at Germanns and Ely's fords they subjected the unfortunate farmers within their lines to the most inhuman treatment. They burned the house of Mr. Reuben Gordon, son of Ger. Wm. F. Gordon, because, as they said, he was an original Secessioemember the gallant Kilpatrick and his men, and their conduct in Gloucester, Middlesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he wilesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he will get a fight out of them before next May, when their term of service expires.
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 2
es, leaving their helpless families without provisions or servants. Most of the negroes within the Yankee lines went off with them. Major Lacy's were saved by his overseer's activity in moving them off before the Yankees reached the Wilderness. Kilpatrick's cavalry distinguished themselves in robbing the negro houses as clean a their masters', not a vestige of clothing was left anywhere. Their courage was shown in knocking down the lame and aged Capt. Green, who told them they were such brave men that if he had a thousand such he could storm Gibraltar. Let our cavalry remember the gallant Kilpatrick and his men, and their conduct in Gloucester, Middlesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he will get a fight out of them before next May, when their term of service expires.
burned the house of Mr. Reuben Gordon, son of Ger. Wm. F. Gordon, because, as they said, he was an original Secessionist, and did not leave a thing of any value whatever on the place.--The farms of Miss Sally Grymes, Mr. Skinker, Mrs. Willis, Captain Beale, Capt. Strother Green, Mr. John Spottswood, Major J. H. lacy, and others, were desolated to that extent that not a meal's victuals was left on any of them. They broke up the furniture of the houses and took off all the clothing and bed linen from every house. The feather beds were emptied out in the yard, and the venerable Capt. Green and his children were reduced to sleeping between two mattresses Mr. John Spottswood and Capt. Beale were taken off by the Yankees, leaving their helpless families without provisions or servants. Most of the negroes within the Yankee lines went off with them. Major Lacy's were saved by his overseer's activity in moving them off before the Yankees reached the Wilderness. Kilpatrick's cavalry d
William F. Gordon (search for this): article 2
Ravages of the enemy when last this side of the Rapidan. After Meade's army had crossed at Germanns and Ely's fords they subjected the unfortunate farmers within their lines to the most inhuman treatment. They burned the house of Mr. Reuben Gordon, son of Ger. Wm. F. Gordon, because, as they said, he was an original Secessionist, and did not leave a thing of any value whatever on the place.--The farms of Miss Sally Grymes, Mr. Skinker, Mrs. Willis, Captain Beale, Capt. Strother Green, Mr. John Spottswood, Major J. H. lacy, and others, were desolated to that extent that not a meal's victuals was left on any of them. They broke up the furniture of the houses and took off all the clothing and bed linen from every house. The feather beds were emptied out in the yard, and the venerable Capt. Green and his children were reduced to sleeping between two mattresses Mr. John Spottswood and Capt. Beale were taken off by the Yankees, leaving their helpless families without provisions or
Ravages of the enemy when last this side of the Rapidan. After Meade's army had crossed at Germanns and Ely's fords they subjected the unfortunate farmers within their lines to the most inhuman treatment. They burned the house of Mr. Reuben Gordon, son of Ger. Wm. F. Gordon, because, as they said, he was an original Secessionist, and did not leave a thing of any value whatever on the place.--The farms of Miss Sally Grymes, Mr. Skinker, Mrs. Willis, Captain Beale, Capt. Strother Green, Mr. John Spottswood, Major J. H. lacy, and others, were desolated to that extent that not a meal's victuals was left on any of them. They broke up the furniture of the houses and took off all the clothing and bed linen from every house. The feather beds were emptied out in the yard, and the venerable Capt. Green and his children were reduced to sleeping between two mattresses Mr. John Spottswood and Capt. Beale were taken off by the Yankees, leaving their helpless families without provisions or
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