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Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
in Gen. Bragg or Gen. Lee. Upon his arrival before Chattanooga, Gen. Bragg proceeded to invest the place on the south side of the Tennessee. He covered Lookout Mountain with his forces, and threw his pickets well down the river below the mountain. The opinion prevailed for some days that Rosecrans would attempt to evacuate earing. A demonstration in such great force and at so vital a point, looked as if it were the prelude to a battle for the possession of Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. It was foreseen at the time, as was stated in my letter of that date, that it was the policy of the Federal commander by threatening our right wing and our depot at Chickamauga to force Gen. Bragg to withdraw a portion of his forces from Lookout Mountain on the extreme left, and thus render it more easy to carry that position by assault. Accordingly, no reflecting man in the army was surprised next morning, Tuesday, the 24th November, when Hooker's guns opened on Lookout.--Gen.
Shellmound (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
bridge, and rushed over a column of infantry and artillery, which began immediately to entrench and fortify itself. On the 29th, Gen. Longstreet, who commanded on the left, was directed to reconnoitre the enemy's position in the valley, ascertain his strength, and make the necessary arrangements to dislodge him. Nothing was done, however, that day or the next, which gave Hooker — who had reached Bridgeport with two corps d'arme, of 12,000 men, from the Potomac — time to march up from Shellmound and take position in the valley late in the afternoon of the 30th. During the following night Gen. Jenkins was ordered by Gen. Longstreet to make a night attack, not upon the forces at the ferry, but upon the reinforcements that had come up from below and gone into camp two miles from the ferry.--Jenkins's command consisted of Hood's division, except Anderson's brigade. Three brigades — Benning's, Lane's, and Robertson's — were ordered to hold the forces at the ferry in check, whilst Je
Moccasin Point (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 7
ommand on Lookout his own division and Cheatham's. These , it was believed, if property be sufficient to hold the position in Lookout Valley, understood corps of 12,000 men, under Hooker on of Stevenson's command was posted mountain; the remainder along the west and north face next the river. A line of breastworks had been thrown up on the north fact, running from the river up towards Lookout Point, and passing near Craven's house. The enemy's batteries in the valley and on Moccasin Point opened at 11 o'clock, and kept up a heavy fire until half-past 12, when his infantry advanced in double lines. The crest of the mountain was enveloped in a thick fog, which prevented our batteries from responding. This fog extended down the mountain side as far as the left of Walthall's brigade, which was posted in front, and was the first, and indeed almost the only, brigade to receive the shock of the enemy's assault.--Under cover of this fog, it is stated, the enemy gained his left
Chickamauga Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
ordingly on the next day the troops were moved by the right flank towards Graysville, and Chickamauga station, in pursuance of the resolution come to at the council of war; but that night the whole pside, and this led Gen. Bragg to order Cleburne's and Buckner's corps to take the cars at Chickamauga Station and proceed with all possible dispatch to Lenoir Station, on the Chattanooga and East Tenn the entire army.--Reynolds's brigade, of Buckner's division, having been turned back at Chickamauga Station, was temporarily attached to Anderson's division. As it was only a few days ago that arms. Of guns we lost thirty-four in the battle, two siege pieces which we destroyed at Chickamauga Station, and four on the retreat. These last-mentioned guns (Fingerson's battery,) have been rec right and Bate's division the ground was blue with their slain. The army retired to Chickamauga Station the night after the battle, and next day marched to Ringgold, and on the succeeding day,
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
the retreat. These last-mentioned guns (Fingerson's battery,) have been recovered, the enemy being unable to get them off after his bloody repulse by Cleburne at Ringgold Gap. Our loss in stores was inconsiderable, and in wagons about one hundred. The Federal loss in killed and wounded was far heavier than ours. In front of our right and Bate's division the ground was blue with their slain. The army retired to Chickamauga Station the night after the battle, and next day marched to Ringgold, and on the succeeding day, the 27th, reached Dalton, where it is still encamped. The pursuit of the enemy was vigorous until the 27th, when it was repulsed by Cleburne with a loss of 300 prisoners, 2,000 killed and wounded, and three flags. On the 29th Gen. Bragg, at his own request, was relieved of the command of the army, and Gen. Hardee appointed to succeed him. In conclusion, it may be permitted me to add that in this and my last preceding letter I have sought to tell the truth,
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ondent.][Concluded.] Dalton, December 8, 1863. Returning to the campaign in this quarter, I would remark that the battle of Chickamauga, if not as decisive as could have been desired, was nevertheless one of the most important and hotly contested engagements of the whole war. It was important not merely in its immediate results, which were of great consequence, but in what it saved us from; for if the Confederates had lost the day, the enemy in all probability would have wintered in Atlanta. As it is, we have gained six months in which to prepare for the great conflict in this quarter next spring, when a struggle will probably ensue along the line of the Georgia State road which is without a parallel on the Western continent. Let us lose no time, therefore, in preparing for the approaching struggle. Time in which to make all needful preparation has been secured to us by Gen. Bragg and his brave army, and it will be our own fault if we do not avail ourselves of the opportuni
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
s would have followed, together with the enforced evacuation of East Tennessee by Burnside. If, therefore, Gens. Polk and Hindman failed to chis transportation was insufficient for a march into the heart of Tennessee, and that time was necessary to prepare his commissariat for so irevious to the events here related Stevenson had been sent into East Tennessee to observe the movements of Burnside, and preventin junctaccompanying and commanding his troopers. Of the operations in East Tennessee I shall not here speak, not being sufficiently informed of whatall possible dispatch to Lenoir Station, on the Chattanooga and East Tennessee road, and head off Sherman, or at all events to joint Longstreein front of Chattanooga, except to give our forces operating in East Tennessee time to accomplish the object of their expedition. The bat equally successful. Bate's brigade, commanded by Col. Tyler, of Tennessee, until he was wounded, then by Col. Rudler, of the 37th Georgia,
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
n may be summed up in round numbers at 1,200 prisoners captured, and about 1,000 wagons with their contents, and immense commissary and quartermaster stores, destroyed, together with a large number of mules, which were killed. Wheeler brought away a considerable number of horses and mules, and all the supplies his men could well carry on horseback.--His own loss was heavy in men and horses, though nothing like that of the enemy. He returned to the south side of the Tennessee not far from Huntsville, and thence proceeded to join the army in front of Chattanooga. The difficulty of subsisting the Federal army increased as the fall months advanced and the wet season set in. The bridges at Bridgeport and Running-water, on the Nashville and Chattanooga railroad, had been destroyed, and this fact, together with our position in Lookout Valley, made it necessary for Rosecrans to rely upon his wagon trains alone for the transportation of his supplies. The distance and the mountainous cou
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Review of Bragg's last campaign. Beginning with the evacuation of Chattanooga in September, and Ending with the retreat upon Dalton in November. [from our own correspondent.][Concluded.] Dalton, December 8, 1863. Returning to the campaign in this quarter, I would remark that the battle of Chickamauga, if notDalton, December 8, 1863. Returning to the campaign in this quarter, I would remark that the battle of Chickamauga, if not as decisive as could have been desired, was nevertheless one of the most important and hotly contested engagements of the whole war. It was important not merely in its immediate results, which were of great consequence, but in what it saved us from; for if the Confederates had lost the day, the enemy in all probability would haveeir slain. The army retired to Chickamauga Station the night after the battle, and next day marched to Ringgold, and on the succeeding day, the 27th, reached Dalton, where it is still encamped. The pursuit of the enemy was vigorous until the 27th, when it was repulsed by Cleburne with a loss of 300 prisoners, 2,000 killed an
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 7
by Gen. Bragg and his brave army, and it will be our own fault if we do not avail ourselves of the opportunity. Monday, the 21st of September, (the day after the battle,) was spent in caring for the wounded and burying the dead, in gathering up the spoils of our brilliant victory, and in reconnoitering the position of the enemy. A council of war was called that night by the General commanding, at which it was determined, as I am credibly informed, to put the army in motion up the Tennessee river the following day, with the intention of crossing that stream, turning the enemy's left flank, and pushing on across the mountains towards Nashville. Accordingly on the next day the troops were moved by the right flank towards Graysville, and Chickamauga station, in pursuance of the resolution come to at the council of war; but that night the whole programme was changed by the Commander-in-Chief, and the head of the column turned back to Chattanooga. It has been said, and I think
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