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Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
to learn the supposed amount. No damage is reported to have been done to private property. The eastward-bound freight train of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad made a narrow escape from capture, passing Salem only about half an hour before the Yankees reached it. A train sent from Lynchburg with the Provost Guard, Capt. Otey, also narrowly escaped being taken. It was fired into when within a short distance of the town; but the engineer promptly reversed his engine and escaped safely. No person on the train was hurt. It is reported that there was fighting near Salem Wednesday evening. It is thought that this is the Yankee raid which has been so long threatened in the Yankee papers, which they promised should come in at the Valley of Virginia and go out at Weldon, N. C. We learn that the authorities have made arrangements to prevent the consummation of this scheme.--Very little damage can be done to the railroad at Salem, as there are no important bridges near there.
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
verill's raid. We have some further particulars of the arrival of Averill and his raiders at Salem. They numbered about 2,800, and were composed of cavalry and mounted infantry.--They reached SaSalem Wednesday morning about 10½ o'clock, without any show of opposition, as far as we could learn, and immediately proceeded to burn the depot and commissary buildings, and to tear up the track of th freight train of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad made a narrow escape from capture, passing Salem only about half an hour before the Yankees reached it. A train sent from Lynchburg with the Provd escaped safely. No person on the train was hurt. It is reported that there was fighting near Salem Wednesday evening. It is thought that this is the Yankee raid which has been so long threatlearn that the authorities have made arrangements to prevent the consummation of this scheme.--Very little damage can be done to the railroad at Salem, as there are no important bridges near there.
lding was stored a large quantity of bacon and corn, all of which, of course, fell a prey to the flames. The loss to the Government is very heavy, though we were unable to learn the supposed amount. No damage is reported to have been done to private property. The eastward-bound freight train of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad made a narrow escape from capture, passing Salem only about half an hour before the Yankees reached it. A train sent from Lynchburg with the Provost Guard, Capt. Otey, also narrowly escaped being taken. It was fired into when within a short distance of the town; but the engineer promptly reversed his engine and escaped safely. No person on the train was hurt. It is reported that there was fighting near Salem Wednesday evening. It is thought that this is the Yankee raid which has been so long threatened in the Yankee papers, which they promised should come in at the Valley of Virginia and go out at Weldon, N. C. We learn that the authorities have
Averill's raid. We have some further particulars of the arrival of Averill and his raiders at Salem. They numbered about 2,800, and were composed of cavalry and mounted infantry.--They reached Salem Wednesday morning about 10½ o'clock, without any show of opposition, as far as we could learn, and immediately proceeded to burn the depot and commissary buildings, and to tear up the track of the railroad, which work they are said to have effectually accomplished. --is the commissary buildinAverill and his raiders at Salem. They numbered about 2,800, and were composed of cavalry and mounted infantry.--They reached Salem Wednesday morning about 10½ o'clock, without any show of opposition, as far as we could learn, and immediately proceeded to burn the depot and commissary buildings, and to tear up the track of the railroad, which work they are said to have effectually accomplished. --is the commissary building was stored a large quantity of bacon and corn, all of which, of course, fell a prey to the flames. The loss to the Government is very heavy, though we were unable to learn the supposed amount. No damage is reported to have been done to private property. The eastward-bound freight train of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad made a narrow escape from capture, passing Salem only about half an hour before the Yankees reached it. A train sent from Lynchburg with the Provost Guard, Capt. Ot